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06-20-2022, 04:30 PM - 1 Like   #16
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So does the top lever set instant/time, the middle lever trip the shutter, and the bottom one change the aperture?

Where's the button to upload automatically upload to Meta?

And you just may need to get yourself a 3D printer so you can fab your own weird camera parts...

-Eric

06-20-2022, 09:44 PM   #17
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Good work; you are preserving history. Here is a picture from 1910, a few years later than the one on the previous page. They managed with simple equipment, yet we today are upset because our auto focus is a split second too slow.

[IMG][/IMG]
06-20-2022, 09:55 PM   #18
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Another awesome find Ismael!
06-22-2022, 06:07 AM   #19
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Great find. A real piece of history there. Eastman took photography to the masses. He wound up buying Boston Camera Manufacturing so he could get their top camera designer on his payroll. He had a knack for bringing in the best people and the even better knack of trusting them to do their job.


For the record, Kodak started manufacturing this camera in 1892 and the patent was not granted to Boston Camera Manufacturing until 1895. Both Kodak and Boston Camera were racing to see whose patent came first. Eastman learned a lesson here and the company became a patent generating machine for the next 100 years. Most patents never used, but all unique things discovered were patented.


The book "George Eastman: A Biography" by Elizabeth Brayer is an excellent read on his life.


The 1/4"-20 1nd 3/8"-20 camera tripod socket have a long history and it's kind of funny that all cameras today use metric in every area same one.

06-23-2022, 04:48 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by gaweidert Quote
Great find. A real piece of history there. Eastman took photography to the masses. He wound up buying Boston Camera Manufacturing so he could get their top camera designer on his payroll. He had a knack for bringing in the best people and the even better knack of trusting them to do their job.


For the record, Kodak started manufacturing this camera in 1892 and the patent was not granted to Boston Camera Manufacturing until 1895. Both Kodak and Boston Camera were racing to see whose patent came first. Eastman learned a lesson here and the company became a patent generating machine for the next 100 years. Most patents never used, but all unique things discovered were patented.


The book "George Eastman: A Biography" by Elizabeth Brayer is an excellent read on his life.


The 1/4"-20 1nd 3/8"-20 camera tripod socket have a long history and it's kind of funny that all cameras today use metric in every area same one.
gaweidert:
Thanks for the lead to Brayer’s Biography of Geo. Eastman. I’m researching these camera histories, and need all the references I can get, and would appreciate knowing what you use. My principal references are “Images and Enterprise” by Reese Jenkins 1975, and “Kodak Cameras, the First Hundred Years”, by Brain Coe, 1988.

About your prior post: I’m curious that the manufacture date for the No. 2 Bulls-Eye Kodak is cited as 1892 and curious about the “race” for a patent. Could you provide a source please?

The references I’ve seen, including Brayer, cite 1895 as the year Kodak introduced the Bullet, their first copy of Boston’s Bulls-Eye. The references also cite 1896 (not 1892) for introduction of the Kodak No. 2 Bulls-Eye. This was after Kodak bought the Boston company in 1895 and obtained the Bulls-Eye name copyright. It appears that the only Bulls-Eye being manufactured between 1892 and mid-1895 was Boston’s.

Brayer describes the sequence regarding the Bulls-Eye starting with Boston’s patent application in 1892, and it’s granting in 1896. Other references note that for years Eastman had been erecting substantial patent barriers to protect his business even before the issue with the Boston patent. To this end, Brayer notes that Eastman had a habit of perusing the daily published list of new patents. If there was a patent race, Eastman was not running very fast: The Boston patent was submitted in 1892, but Kodak (under Frank Brownell’s name) applied several years later.

Thanks for posting!
06-24-2022, 01:38 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Prekodcam Quote
gaweidert:
Thanks for the lead to Brayer’s Biography of Geo. Eastman. I’m researching these camera histories, and need all the references I can get, and would appreciate knowing what you use. My principal references are “Images and Enterprise” by Reese Jenkins 1975, and “Kodak Cameras, the First Hundred Years”, by Brain Coe, 1988.

About your prior post: I’m curious that the manufacture date for the No. 2 Bulls-Eye Kodak is cited as 1892 and curious about the “race” for a patent. Could you provide a source please?

The references I’ve seen, including Brayer, cite 1895 as the year Kodak introduced the Bullet, their first copy of Boston’s Bulls-Eye. The references also cite 1896 (not 1892) for introduction of the Kodak No. 2 Bulls-Eye. This was after Kodak bought the Boston company in 1895 and obtained the Bulls-Eye name copyright. It appears that the only Bulls-Eye being manufactured between 1892 and mid-1895 was Boston’s.

Brayer describes the sequence regarding the Bulls-Eye starting with Boston’s patent application in 1892, and it’s granting in 1896. Other references note that for years Eastman had been erecting substantial patent barriers to protect his business even before the issue with the Boston patent. To this end, Brayer notes that Eastman had a habit of perusing the daily published list of new patents. If there was a patent race, Eastman was not running very fast: The Boston patent was submitted in 1892, but Kodak (under Frank Brownell’s name) applied several years later.

Thanks for posting!
I guess that "race" for a patent was a poor choice of words. The same sort of thing happened when Kodak lost it's suit to Polaroid. Even the judge wrote in his ruling in that case that he had never seen a company work so hard so as to not infringe on a patent. The aftermath of Kodak losing that case was pretty stunning to see. Whole floors of a building just left as is. It was like the people simply vanished in mid stride. Pretty eerie. Even coffee cups were left sitting there.


In any event George did what he always did back then. If you can't beat them buy them.
08-17-2022, 04:45 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
Hello,

A major milestone in my camera collection! I've finally crossed 2 century boundaries and have reached into the 19th Century!
I'm really excited!

George Eastman introduced the "Kodak" camera in 1888, helping to start a revolution and create a whole new industry: Amateur photography! Photography was no longer reserved to the top social elite. It was now becoming available to regular people.
But he was not the only one in this race. The Boston Camera Company was founded in 1884. They launched the Hawk-Eye Detective camera in 1888 (same year as the Kodak) with good success. By 1892 they introduced the Bulls-Eye camera: The first camera to have an exposure number indicator window. This little red window, which gave the name Bulls-Eye, allowed to safely see the back of the paper backing of roll film, which was marked for exposure counting. George Eastman liked the idea and quickly licensed the patent to make his own version, the "Bullet". But in 1895 George Eastman bought the Boston Camera Company altogether and continued producing the Bulls-Eye camera as a Kodak product line. Variations include model designations 1896, 1897, 1898, Model C and Model D, which was made until 1913.

My specimen:
I've been blessed with the opportunity to find this after a long hunt. It is in excellent condition. My brain exploded when I realized it is over 125 years old!

No.2 BULLS-EYE Model of 1896




Tripod socket!





To open de camera, you release a latch with this lever:



There are some pencil markings inside but I think I'll leave those alone. Otherwise pristine!




A wooden 101 spool!


The take up side:


You remove the advancing key and insert it thru the take up spool.




The shutter with time and instantaneous exposures plus 3 aperture settings. Brass was replaced with nickel in 1897.


Three aperture settings:
Smallest aperture


Middle aperture


Larger aperture


The view from the back.


This is getting serious. I'll carefully clean it but will not do anything crazy like further disassembly. Of course the intention is to eventually shoot at least a roll of 120 thru it. It is over 125 years old!!!

Thanks,
Ismael
Hi Ismael

Have you managed to shoot some images with this camera yet?

Kind regards,
Mark

08-22-2022, 10:00 PM   #23
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Kodak & their oddball roll films, in this case 101 film falls into the "Square large format" aka 3.5"x3.5"
08-23-2022, 05:13 AM - 1 Like   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
Hi Ismael

Have you managed to shoot some images with this camera yet?

Kind regards,
Mark
Hello,

Not yet. I've been very busy with work, life in general and out of town recently. This one is quite special and I don't want to rush it. Some pre-work is still needed. I hope I can get back to it soon.

Thanks,
Ismael
08-23-2022, 03:04 PM - 1 Like   #25
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No rush! I was worried I missed a post of yours somewhere!
Kind regards,
Mark
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