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02-07-2022, 04:34 PM - 6 Likes   #1
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Brownie Hawkeye

Weíve seen the Kodak Hawkeye that isnít a Brownie. This is the Brownie Hawkeye.

Made from 1950 to 1961 this camera has one aperture, no focusing, and one non-bulb shutter setting (between 1/30th-1/60th is typical for measured performance). This version uses 620 film.

The lens was really dirty but the camera itself is quite clean. I cleaned it up and plan to run some film through it later. The film shown here was stored with the camera. Not stored in the fridge. I will get more film but Iíll probably shoot this also.

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

Brownie Hawkeye by -vanya_42nd-

02-07-2022, 04:41 PM   #2
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Nice!

That camera has quite a following among film shooters. Looking forward to see pictures taken with it!

Thanks,
Ismael
02-07-2022, 05:43 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
one aperture, [...] and one non-bulb shutter setting
How would this work in practice, if there's no control over settings? Is it designed to be used outdoors in mostly bright light and anything else in bulb, presumably not what most users would pick?
02-07-2022, 05:51 PM - 2 Likes   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by aaacb Quote
How would this work in practice, if there's no control over settings? Is it designed to be used outdoors in mostly bright light and anything else in bulb, presumably not what most users would pick?
Negative film has huge latitude. Also you pick the film to suit the situation. 620 film only has 12 exposures per roll in a Brownie Hawkeye (2.25 x 2.25Ē negatives).

02-07-2022, 07:09 PM - 1 Like   #5
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What film should I use? I have a trip to photograph old barns with my dad. I plan to take my Sony A7R3 and heís bringing his A7R2. I think some nice Brownie shots will be worthwhile as well. Black and white is a given, but maybe not all. B&H has a few choices (film photography project basic film - 100 ISO $14, Kodak portra 160 $21, Kodak Tri-X 400 - $20, Arista EDU Ultra 100 Black and White - $14, Arista EDU Ultra 400 Black and White - $14, Ilford FP4+ Black and White - ISO 125 - $20, Kodak Professional Portra 400 Color - $26, Kodak Professional T-Max 400 Black and White - $21, Ilford HP5+ Black and White - ISO 400 - $20, Kodak Professional T-Max 100 Black and White - $20)

It is also possible to respool 120 film. This is considerably cheaper but annoying for just a couple of rolls.
02-07-2022, 07:29 PM   #6
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Hello,

From what I've seen, these cameras are set to EV values of ~12-14 which would put it in the ballpark of Sunny 11 for ISO 60 film. ISO 125 would be 1 or 2 stops over depending on the shutter speed, well within latitude's range. ISO 400 may be too much for bright sunny scenes as it could be as much as 5 stops over. But of course this is all in my lousy quick calculations.
I would try ISO 100 - 125. I think 400 may be too much for bright sunny scenes.
I'm about to respool Portra 160 and Ilford FP4+ 125 from 120 to 620. Far less expensive.

Thanks,
Ismael
02-07-2022, 07:48 PM - 1 Like   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
Hello,

From what I've seen, these cameras are set to EV values of ~12-14 which would put it in the ballpark of Sunny 11 for ISO 60 film. ISO 125 would be 1 or 2 stops over depending on the shutter speed, well within latitude's range. ISO 400 may be too much for bright sunny scenes as it could be as much as 5 stops over. But of course this is all in my lousy quick calculations.
I would try ISO 100 - 125. I think 400 may be too much for bright sunny scenes.
I'm about to respool Portra 160 and Ilford FP4+ 125 from 120 to 620. Far less expensive.

Thanks,
Ismael
My back of the envelope calc was f16@1/125th for sunny 16 suggests that roughly f16@1/30th is two stops over exposed. This means that I can shoot from sunny hard shadows to sunset with iso 125. (+/- 2 stops is nothing to b&w negative film) so unless Iím going to shoot later at night Iím in total agreement that iso 100-125 is a rational option. The iso 200 old film I have is likely degraded to at least that slow or slower. So I figure Iíll treat it as iso 100 and hope.

Respooling seems well worth it if you have multiple uses for 120 film. I do have a Diana clone (Arrow) that mimics my camera that I had at 5 that got me into this hobby. So I might shoot a roll through that camera as well - it takes 120. But thatís it. I certainly donít need loads of rolls. HummmÖ

---------- Post added 02-07-22 at 10:09 PM ----------

Fp4 says ďup to two stops under and six stops over exposedĒ!

This manual is for the flash model but all the rest applies.

https://www.brownie-camera.com/manuals/bhawkeyeflashmod.pdf

02-07-2022, 10:17 PM   #8
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My dad had one of these Hawkeyes but we think he left it on the side of a stream somewhere. We were never sure where it went. But it was a great camera that took excellent photos.
02-08-2022, 12:13 AM   #9
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Thatís a weirdly interesting camera. Color Negative has a lot of tolerance. Canít wait to see some shots!
02-08-2022, 12:41 AM   #10
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You might put a bit of black tape over the red window in between shots. K.
02-08-2022, 07:17 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by womble Quote
You might put a bit of black tape over the red window in between shots. K.
Why? I have looked at it and the red seems intact and I faded - I remember some degrading can occur but I thought that was mostly for cameras exposed to the sun. This one has been largely unused from what I can see. I suspect it spent a lot of time in the box. Also 620/120 is paper backed, whatís the level of the problem typically with slower film like 125 iso?
02-08-2022, 01:59 PM   #12
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Modern panchromatic films are generally more sensitive to the whole light spectrum than they were 60 years ago. In general, if you use the film fairly quickly there are rarely problems, but some of my older cameras will have a problem if you take a little while to use it, or if the camera is out in the sun. For the sake of a little bit of black electric tape that you can peel back when you wind on, it is worth just being a little cautious.
02-08-2022, 02:02 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by womble Quote
Modern panchromatic films are generally more sensitive to the whole light spectrum than they were 60 years ago. In general, if you use the film fairly quickly there are rarely problems, but some of my older cameras will have a problem if you take a little while to use it, or if the camera is out in the sun. For the sake of a little bit of black electric tape that you can peel back when you wind on, it is worth just being a little cautious.
thatís helpful. Thanks for explaining.
02-09-2022, 06:26 AM - 1 Like   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Weíve seen the Kodak Hawkeye that isnít a Brownie. This is the Brownie Hawkeye.

Made from 1950 to 1961 this camera has one aperture, no focusing, and one non-bulb shutter setting (between 1/30th-1/60th is typical for measured performance). This version uses 620 film.

The lens was really dirty but the camera itself is quite clean. I cleaned it up and plan to run some film through it later. The film shown here was stored with the camera. Not stored in the fridge. I will get more film but Iíll probably shoot this also.
About the time I entered high school {so we're talking the early 1960's}, my Dad gave me the Kodak "Duaflex" he had been using when I was young. I used it through high school and college, and only rarely after I used college graduation money to purchase a rangefinder camera. We accidentally left it behind when we moved in 2003, so my words come purely from memory.

Like your "Hawkeye" this "Duaflex" had a fixed aperture {probably around f/16} and fixed shutter speed {probably around 1/100}, and used "620" film. In the early days, Kodak sold "VP" {"ASA" 125} B&W negative, "CX" {"ASA" 64} color negative, and "EX" {"ASA" 64} color slide film for it. Over time, "C" {"ASA 80} film replaced the "CX" film; I remember last using "CL" {"ASA" 200} film with it; the same emulsions were available in Instamatic cartridges. If I still had that camera {recently I considered purchasing another one via eBay, but my wife reminded that it might look the same, but I would know it didn't have the same sentimental past}, I would look for a ISO 100 film.
02-09-2022, 06:41 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by aaacb Quote
How would this work in practice, if there's no control over settings? Is it designed to be used outdoors in mostly bright light and anything else in bulb, presumably not what most users would pick?
I believe it is permanently-set to use the "f/16 rule".
By sun or flash.
Kodak cameras were the original "point and shoot".
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