Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
07-28-2022, 05:09 PM - 4 Likes   #1
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
ismaelg's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Puerto Rico
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,576
Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B: Quite a long name!

Hello,

What a long name! Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B
Quoting Brian Coe's book, : "The Hawk-Eye trademark was originally owned by the Boston Camera Company, and passed to the Blair Camera Company when they bought the Boston firm in 1890. In 1907 The Eastman Kodak Company bought Blair outright and moved the plant to Rochester to form the Blair Camera Division. The production of Hawk-Eye cameras continued, but after World War One the majority of cameras bearing this name were made for premium sales only, and are not always listed in regular catalogues." KODAK CAMERAS THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS / Brian Coe / Page 295

I have personally found that Kodak Hawk-Eye cameras can be hard to research. There is little information out there. As mentioned, they don't show in catalogs which is a big help in research. In many cases Hawk-Eyes are rebadged models of other lines. There is a book on Hawk-Eye cameras from the 1980's that has eluded me for years. Never been able to find it.

The Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B was made from 1926 until 1934. The 2A designation means it uses 116 format roll film which was discontinued decades ago. I have done some online research and there seems to be 2 different variations of this camera: One with a meniscus Achromatic lens and one with a Rapid Rectilinear lens design (two lens groups, one in front and one behind the aperture diaphragm). I haven't found any information regarding if they were both made concurrently or otherwise during all the production years. I have only seen them with Kodex shutters so I believe no other shutters were offered.
From my own research this camera is very similar to the No. 2A Folding Autographic Brownie camera that was made from 1915 until 1926. Sure enough, part of the offerings of this Brownie camera were availability with a meniscus Achromatic lens or Rapid Rectilinear lens, both with Kodex shutter. Other lens/shutter combinations were available in the Brownie. The Hawk-Eye does not have the autographic feature.

The Kodex shutter on the Hawk-Eye had settings for Time exposures, Bulb, 1/25s and 1/50s. It also features a cable release socket. Aperture with the meniscus Achromatic lens is marked 1 to 4, while with the Rapid Rectiliniear is marked f8 to f64. Curiously, I found the lens is mechanically limited to f8 as the widest aperture, but it can open up to what I think is at least f6.3 when disassembled. More on that later.
The folding mechanism clicks in 3 focusing positions identified in both feet and meters: 8ft - 2.5m, 25ft - 8m and 100ft - 30m

My specimen:

I received this from a friend:





Some loose parts of the viewfinder and what seems to be an original cable release.




The bellows are in remarkably good shape. But the shutter is jammed.
Cut the chase. You know where this is going.


This No 1 Kodex shutters were very well built. Most of the time they are just only dirty.
After considerable time cleaning and a HUGE scare after a spring flew out (spent long minutes on my knees combing the floor until found)
Actually took several cleaning rounds to have it work properly.


Long story short:


Everything went back together




There is a small chip on the rear glass. If this camera could talk!




Not pictured here but there is a patent number engraved in the back of the shutter that corresponds to a Feb 1927 shutter housing patent. So we know this camera is from 1927-1934, not the first year or so of production.

The viewfinder was serviced as well


Everything else inside and out; bellows, bed, rails, knobs, struts, strap, etc. was meticulously cleaned and polished. Retouched the paint in some worn areas like around tripod socket and distance scale.


What is most likely the original cable release was serviced as well


A gorgeous number 2 is engraved on the button. Not surprisingly, slightly worn.


1910 and 1919 patents







May I present for your approval my "new" Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B

The serial number is 559xxx. The lowest I've seen in my research is 385xxx and the highest 656xxx. So I would say maybe around 1930? Who knows. More research is needed for an accurate estimate.

























Compared to the international standard unit of photographic measurement:




Stay tuned for a field test. Some day. Eventually. Don't rush me!
While beautiful and in perfect working order, this camera may not very practical for frequent use because it is designed for 116 film. Adapting 120 film will only yield 5 pictures to a roll, 6 with lots of practice. However, the HUGE negatives are just gorgeous!

Really enjoyed working on this one. What do you think?

Thanks,
Ismael

07-28-2022, 09:00 PM - 1 Like   #2
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Toledo, OR
Posts: 776
Absolutely beautiful. These old cameras were such a work of art. The perfect balance between beauty and function.
07-28-2022, 09:18 PM - 1 Like   #3
Moderator
Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
MarkJerling's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Wairarapa, New Zealand
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 19,147
QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
Hello,

What a long name! Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B
Quoting Brian Coe's book, : "The Hawk-Eye trademark was originally owned by the Boston Camera Company, and passed to the Blair Camera Company when they bought the Boston firm in 1890. In 1907 The Eastman Kodak Company bought Blair outright and moved the plant to Rochester to form the Blair Camera Division. The production of Hawk-Eye cameras continued, but after World War One the majority of cameras bearing this name were made for premium sales only, and are not always listed in regular catalogues." KODAK CAMERAS THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS / Brian Coe / Page 295

I have personally found that Kodak Hawk-Eye cameras can be hard to research. There is little information out there. As mentioned, they don't show in catalogs which is a big help in research. In many cases Hawk-Eyes are rebadged models of other lines. There is a book on Hawk-Eye cameras from the 1980's that has eluded me for years. Never been able to find it.

The Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B was made from 1926 until 1934. The 2A designation means it uses 116 format roll film which was discontinued decades ago. I have done some online research and there seems to be 2 different variations of this camera: One with a meniscus Achromatic lens and one with a Rapid Rectilinear lens design (two lens groups, one in front and one behind the aperture diaphragm). I haven't found any information regarding if they were both made concurrently or otherwise during all the production years. I have only seen them with Kodex shutters so I believe no other shutters were offered.
From my own research this camera is very similar to the No. 2A Folding Autographic Brownie camera that was made from 1915 until 1926. Sure enough, part of the offerings of this Brownie camera were availability with a meniscus Achromatic lens or Rapid Rectilinear lens, both with Kodex shutter. Other lens/shutter combinations were available in the Brownie. The Hawk-Eye does not have the autographic feature.

The Kodex shutter on the Hawk-Eye had settings for Time exposures, Bulb, 1/25s and 1/50s. It also features a cable release socket. Aperture with the meniscus Achromatic lens is marked 1 to 4, while with the Rapid Rectiliniear is marked f8 to f64. Curiously, I found the lens is mechanically limited to f8 as the widest aperture, but it can open up to what I think is at least f6.3 when disassembled. More on that later.
The folding mechanism clicks in 3 focusing positions identified in both feet and meters: 8ft - 2.5m, 25ft - 8m and 100ft - 30m

My specimen:

I received this from a friend:





Some loose parts of the viewfinder and what seems to be an original cable release.




The bellows are in remarkably good shape. But the shutter is jammed.
Cut the chase. You know where this is going.


This No 1 Kodex shutters were very well built. Most of the time they are just only dirty.
After considerable time cleaning and a HUGE scare after a spring flew out (spent long minutes on my knees combing the floor until found)
Actually took several cleaning rounds to have it work properly.


Long story short:
https://youtu.be/mhUqUvEohuw


Everything went back together




There is a small chip on the rear glass. If this camera could talk!




Not pictured here but there is a patent number engraved in the back of the shutter that corresponds to a Feb 1927 shutter housing patent. So we know this camera is from 1927-1934, not the first year or so of production.

The viewfinder was serviced as well


Everything else inside and out; bellows, bed, rails, knobs, struts, strap, etc. was meticulously cleaned and polished. Retouched the paint in some worn areas like around tripod socket and distance scale.


What is most likely the original cable release was serviced as well


A gorgeous number 2 is engraved on the button. Not surprisingly, slightly worn.


1910 and 1919 patents







May I present for your approval my "new" Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B

The serial number is 559xxx. The lowest I've seen in my research is 385xxx and the highest 656xxx. So I would say maybe around 1930? Who knows. More research is needed for an accurate estimate.

























Compared to the international standard unit of photographic measurement:




Stay tuned for a field test. Some day. Eventually. Don't rush me!
While beautiful and in perfect working order, this camera may not very practical for frequent use because it is designed for 116 film. Adapting 120 film will only yield 5 pictures to a roll, 6 with lots of practice. However, the HUGE negatives are just gorgeous!

Really enjoyed working on this one. What do you think?

Thanks,
Ismael
You're the master! Beautifully done Ismael.
07-29-2022, 04:09 AM - 1 Like   #4
amateur dirt farmer
Loyal Site Supporter
pepperberry farm's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: probably out in a field somewhere...
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 34,888
amazing work - bravo!

07-30-2022, 05:40 PM - 1 Like   #5
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
arnold's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Queensland
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 4,165
QuoteOriginally posted by ismaelg Quote
Hello,

What a long name! Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B
Quoting Brian Coe's book, : "The Hawk-Eye trademark was originally owned by the Boston Camera Company, and passed to the Blair Camera Company when they bought the Boston firm in 1890. In 1907 The Eastman Kodak Company bought Blair outright and moved the plant to Rochester to form the Blair Camera Division. The production of Hawk-Eye cameras continued, but after World War One the majority of cameras bearing this name were made for premium sales only, and are not always listed in regular catalogues." KODAK CAMERAS THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS / Brian Coe / Page 295

I have personally found that Kodak Hawk-Eye cameras can be hard to research. There is little information out there. As mentioned, they don't show in catalogs which is a big help in research. In many cases Hawk-Eyes are rebadged models of other lines. There is a book on Hawk-Eye cameras from the 1980's that has eluded me for years. Never been able to find it.

The Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B was made from 1926 until 1934. The 2A designation means it uses 116 format roll film which was discontinued decades ago. I have done some online research and there seems to be 2 different variations of this camera: One with a meniscus Achromatic lens and one with a Rapid Rectilinear lens design (two lens groups, one in front and one behind the aperture diaphragm). I haven't found any information regarding if they were both made concurrently or otherwise during all the production years. I have only seen them with Kodex shutters so I believe no other shutters were offered.
From my own research this camera is very similar to the No. 2A Folding Autographic Brownie camera that was made from 1915 until 1926. Sure enough, part of the offerings of this Brownie camera were availability with a meniscus Achromatic lens or Rapid Rectilinear lens, both with Kodex shutter. Other lens/shutter combinations were available in the Brownie. The Hawk-Eye does not have the autographic feature.

The Kodex shutter on the Hawk-Eye had settings for Time exposures, Bulb, 1/25s and 1/50s. It also features a cable release socket. Aperture with the meniscus Achromatic lens is marked 1 to 4, while with the Rapid Rectiliniear is marked f8 to f64. Curiously, I found the lens is mechanically limited to f8 as the widest aperture, but it can open up to what I think is at least f6.3 when disassembled. More on that later.
The folding mechanism clicks in 3 focusing positions identified in both feet and meters: 8ft - 2.5m, 25ft - 8m and 100ft - 30m

My specimen:

I received this from a friend:





Some loose parts of the viewfinder and what seems to be an original cable release.




The bellows are in remarkably good shape. But the shutter is jammed.
Cut the chase. You know where this is going.


This No 1 Kodex shutters were very well built. Most of the time they are just only dirty.
After considerable time cleaning and a HUGE scare after a spring flew out (spent long minutes on my knees combing the floor until found)
Actually took several cleaning rounds to have it work properly.


Long story short:
https://youtu.be/mhUqUvEohuw


Everything went back together




There is a small chip on the rear glass. If this camera could talk!




Not pictured here but there is a patent number engraved in the back of the shutter that corresponds to a Feb 1927 shutter housing patent. So we know this camera is from 1927-1934, not the first year or so of production.

The viewfinder was serviced as well


Everything else inside and out; bellows, bed, rails, knobs, struts, strap, etc. was meticulously cleaned and polished. Retouched the paint in some worn areas like around tripod socket and distance scale.


What is most likely the original cable release was serviced as well


A gorgeous number 2 is engraved on the button. Not surprisingly, slightly worn.


1910 and 1919 patents







May I present for your approval my "new" Eastman Kodak No. 2A Folding Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B

The serial number is 559xxx. The lowest I've seen in my research is 385xxx and the highest 656xxx. So I would say maybe around 1930? Who knows. More research is needed for an accurate estimate.

























Compared to the international standard unit of photographic measurement:




Stay tuned for a field test. Some day. Eventually. Don't rush me!
While beautiful and in perfect working order, this camera may not very practical for frequent use because it is designed for 116 film. Adapting 120 film will only yield 5 pictures to a roll, 6 with lots of practice. However, the HUGE negatives are just gorgeous!

Really enjoyed working on this one. What do you think?

Thanks,
Ismael
Wonderful work, so much so, that it would be a service to posterity if all this were available in a reference book. So little of this information remains, that what you have done over the years should be preserved in a more permanent manner, for all to share. I wonder if it is possible to find a sponsor in some photographic society.
08-07-2022, 10:51 AM   #6
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Toledo, OR
Posts: 776
QuoteOriginally posted by arnold Quote
Wonderful work, so much so, that it would be a service to posterity if all this were available in a reference book. So little of this information remains, that what you have done over the years should be preserved in a more permanent manner, for all to share. I wonder if it is possible to find a sponsor in some photographic society.
I agree, Ismael should publish a book that includes the history as well as his restoration of these cameras.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, cameras, eastman, kodak, lens, model, research, shutter, vintage
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kodak Folding Cameras disconnekt Vintage Cameras and Equipment 5 04-07-2022 04:41 AM
c1927 Kodak No. 2 Cartridge Hawk-Eye Model B, UK version ismaelg Vintage Cameras and Equipment 7 02-11-2022 12:28 PM
Restoration: Kodak No.2 Model F circa 1927-1930 The ultimate vintage box camera? ismaelg Vintage Cameras and Equipment 12 02-02-2022 11:08 AM
Difference between Pentax '67ii' folding focus hood and '67' folding focus hood? rustyair Pentax Medium Format 3 10-02-2013 08:10 AM
Kodak 1A JR autographic folding camera - my proof sheet 247nino General Talk 3 05-02-2008 09:26 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:00 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top