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09-09-2012, 11:31 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ole Quote
I keep the second one in a camerabag (that holds two cameras with lens nose down) and just swap them as needed. I haven't found a working solution to the 'banging against each other' problem.

Same here. When I do have 2 bodies out, I use one on a harness and the second on a wrist strap, but I only do this for a short period.

09-09-2012, 12:47 PM   #17
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I use OP-TECH pro straps on both bodys and have had them slung off each shoulder to switch between them on a couple of occasions, but normally the secondary (usually the GX10) is lens down in a Lowepro Toploader pro though ready to grab as needed
09-10-2012, 09:03 AM   #18
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I often carry two bodies, sometimes with very large lenses, and the Cotton Carrier system is easily the best way to do this IMO. My very long birding kit is a K-7 with an FA* 300 f2.8 +TCs and a K-5 with an FA* 300 f4.5 with TCs or a Sigma EX 180 Macro with TCs (which is essentially the same as far as carry weight). I carry the big lens on the chest carrier and the smaller lens on the holster carrier, either attached to the vest or the Cotton Carrier belt system. The Cotton Carrier system keeps the cameras close to the body and they don't bang against other, but the best part is they don't bang against me when I'm walking, which has always been a problem with other straps. The cameras are very secure and quick to deploy, and I can bend over and move around without anything swinging.

May not be for everyone, but I've tried just about everything, and this really works for me. It's pricey, and the vest unit looks pretty geeky, but I've gotten over that -- this is the most comfortable carry for any camera/lens combo that I've tried -- by far.

Here's a link to the Imaging Resource Review -- it explains the system a lot better than the company's website, IMO.
Digital Imaging Accessory Review: Cotton Carrier Camera Systems

Scott
09-10-2012, 09:54 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aegon Quote
The mule is cheaper and probably better.
Without a doubt! You might also consider hiring native bearers to carry those
steamer trunks through deepest darkest... Where did you say you were going?

Seriously though, two cameras around your neck at one time can be quite a drag.
A good, easy to work from shoulder bag can be a godsend in such situations.
Domke bags are my favorite. I'd suggest a Domke model F6 or larger.

Chris


Last edited by ChrisPlatt; 09-10-2012 at 10:01 AM.
09-10-2012, 11:58 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by snostorm Quote
I often carry two bodies, sometimes with very large lenses, and the Cotton Carrier system is easily the best way to do this IMO. My very long birding kit is a K-7 with an FA* 300 f2.8 +TCs and a K-5 with an FA* 300 f4.5 with TCs or a Sigma EX 180 Macro with TCs (which is essentially the same as far as carry weight). I carry the big lens on the chest carrier and the smaller lens on the holster carrier, either attached to the vest or the Cotton Carrier belt system. The Cotton Carrier system keeps the cameras close to the body and they don't bang against other, but the best part is they don't bang against me when I'm walking, which has always been a problem with other straps. The cameras are very secure and quick to deploy, and I can bend over and move around without anything swinging.

May not be for everyone, but I've tried just about everything, and this really works for me. It's pricey, and the vest unit looks pretty geeky, but I've gotten over that -- this is the most comfortable carry for any camera/lens combo that I've tried -- by far.

Here's a link to the Imaging Resource Review -- it explains the system a lot better than the company's website, IMO.
Digital Imaging Accessory Review: Cotton Carrier Camera Systems

Scott
I agree. I have a similar situation. When shooting sports, I sometimes like to have 2 bodies available, one usually with the Sigma 100-300 f4. With that one, most easily carryable bags don't fit it, so it's very difficult to put down. I started looking for a way to be able to carry and quickly access two bodies. I saw that Cotton Carrier system in a camera store, and was very impressed by it. The problem is, it's $190. It does seem very well designed, but that's just too much for me to justify right now. I am contemplating purchasing what looks to be a knock-off of it.
Amazon.com: Opteka MCH-25 Multi Camera Carrier Harness Holster System for DSLR Cameras: Camera & Photo. It's only $40.

No question the geek factor is high for either of these. But I guess carrying two bodies at once makes looking geeky unavailable. I can't see wearing one for most regular casual shooting. Looking for feedback anyone has on systems to keep two bodies and lenses easily at hand.
09-10-2012, 12:23 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
Without a doubt! You might also consider hiring native bearers to carry those
steamer trunks through deepest darkest... Where did you say you were going?

Seriously though, two cameras around your neck at one time can be quite a drag.
A good, easy to work from shoulder bag can be a godsend in such situations.
Domke bags are my favorite. I'd suggest a Domke model F6 or larger.

Chris
Don't worry about the mule, just load the wagon!
09-10-2012, 12:42 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
A good, easy to work from shoulder bag can be a godsend in such situations.
Domke bags are my favorite. I'd suggest a Domke model F6 or larger.
I have an old old shoulder bag that my in-laws let me have. Looks pretty similar to the Domke F6, but there is absolutely no insert so items are going to be flying around in there. If I could figure out a cheap way to make my own DIY insert, it'd be much better than the Tamrac SLR backpack that I have now, which is light and compact, but impossible to access while I have it on.
09-17-2012, 03:49 AM   #23
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I'm planning on using two Spider Holsters (Black Widow versions are enough for me as I don't have any heavy/large lenses).

09-17-2012, 04:15 AM   #24
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I wear a steel reinforced strap across my body with one camera ready to go, usually worn under a coat for safety reasons. The other one is in my bag, also ready to go and it is similarly reinforced. I don't like cameras just hanging from straps out in the open. Might as well be asking someone to come by and rip them off you.
09-17-2012, 01:27 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ole Quote
I keep the second one in a camerabag (that holds two cameras with lens nose down) and just swap them as needed. I haven't found a working solution to the 'banging against each other' problem.
The classic solution, there, Ole: you can juggle three bodies that way, make a triangle between shoulder, neck, bag. (One body may ride on top of the bag from your shoulder: heavier rig stays usually on neck.)

Stock straps are too thin if you have this concern. I swear by a combination of Op-Tech neoprene 'Boomerangs,') (I think they call them 'pro straps' ) and Lowepro 'Speedster' straps or the Domke equivalent. Everything's lens-down in a bag until it's in play, and then you've got the same shoulder, your neck, and your hand to manage the gear. Pretty much how it's always been done. There's fancy new straps that let you hang even more cameras low on your shooting-hand side, if you like, but it really depends what you're doing.
09-17-2012, 01:29 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChooseAName Quote
I have an old old shoulder bag that my in-laws let me have. Looks pretty similar to the Domke F6, but there is absolutely no insert so items are going to be flying around in there. If I could figure out a cheap way to make my own DIY insert, it'd be much better than the Tamrac SLR backpack that I have now, which is light and compact, but impossible to access while I have it on.
Last I looked, you could find all manner of inserts quite reasonably priced on Ebay. Or Mags here might even sew you one. It's not that hard.
09-18-2012, 01:48 AM   #27
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It's really easy. It's almost like sewing pillows or a quilt actually. It's all simple squares and batting between. Or if you want to go the really easy route you can just use 2-3 layers of heavy fleece and skip the batting. You just make 4 sides worth of squares, plus a big one for the bottom. You can use fabric glue to put in velcro and sew another square or two for dividers. The other thing you can do is just use thermal socks. They're nicely padded and they'll keep things from moving around and getting damaged.

There's a pattern pdf here that's decent if anyone wants to try it for themselves. It's a little different from how I do mine but it works.

http://sewing.craftgossip.com/tutorial-diy-padded-camera-bag-insert/2010/10/28/

Last edited by magkelly; 09-18-2012 at 02:01 AM.
09-18-2012, 03:46 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by magkelly Quote
There's a pattern pdf here that's decent if anyone wants to try it for themselves. It's a little different from how I do mine but it works.

Tutorial: DIY padded camera bag insert
Thanks Mag. My wife is the seamstress of the family so I just passed that on to her to see if it would be worth the effort for her to make a couple of the velcro dividers (don't need the big main insert). Otherwise I think it would be hard to beat $7 for a couple of neoprene lens pouches from the Oft-Maligned(?) Auction Site:
Matin Neoprene Soft Waterproof Camera Lens Pouch bag Case Size M G002 | eBay
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