Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-01-2014, 10:50 AM   #31
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: N.E. Ohio
Posts: 535
QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
There are any number of sites on eBay that carry Hammond Generator Oil. I have never owned a Leslie, so I don't know what the oil is for the bearings. Once you take the back cover off the Hammond, the lube points are easily located on the generator. It's been 45 years since I had anything to do with them, so I cannot give you an oil drop count, but I am sure you can find that on the web as well.

You are very smart not to try to fire the old girl up until you have lubed it. Many a generator has died with bad bearings from lack of service. Even if you lube it after it has been used for several years without servicing it, often you find transients from the shaft motion in the bearings are contaminating the sound.

PS: If you have never used an older Hammond, it is 8 seconds on the start switch before you turn on the run switch. Then I usually held for an additional 8 seconds or so, making sure it settled into the run speed. You can hear the start coil whining after you hit the run switch, and it should be stable before you let go of the start switch.

PPS: Use a vacuum cleaner and get all the dust off the electronics in the back. Some dust bunnies are flammable.
Yeah, I could be making too much of the job (not having researched this; though I do know the tube electronics cold). Moving these "iron-packed" pieces away from walls is no small task on carpet, without brawny help; so, being guitar-centric now, I've let it go. They look nearly new after half a century, as they've never been moved about. Dad was thrifty, but when it was important, he did it right: Graflex, Rollei, Leica M3, Hammond... The start-up ritual must sound like something from the Model-T era to Gen.s X, Y, et.al. who aren't musicians.


Last edited by Kayaker-J; 03-01-2014 at 10:56 AM.
03-01-2014, 11:40 AM   #32
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Canada_Rockies's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sparwood, BC, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,200
QuoteOriginally posted by Kayaker-J Quote
Yeah, I could be making too much of the job (not having researched this; though I do know the tube electronics cold). Moving these "iron-packed" pieces away from walls is no small task on carpet, without brawny help; so, being guitar-centric now, I've let it go. They look nearly new after half a century, as they've never been moved about. Dad was thrifty, but when it was important, he did it right: Graflex, Rollei, Leica M3, Hammond... The start-up ritual must sound like something from the Model-T era to Gen.s X, Y, et.al. who aren't musicians.
Later Hammonds went to the automatic start for the generator, but the old ones were fine as long as you followed the start routine every time. It could be bad news if you did not let the generator get up to speed before turning on the run switch and letting the speed settle in to the 60 Hz synchronous motor. I think I recall some heating problems if you didn't let it settle down properly, but I might be imagining that. I think Hammond generators run at 3,600 rpm using 60 Hz alternating current to keep the pitch. I am also pretty sure that there are generators that synchronize to 50 Hz as well. The electronics have just old electronics problems. I don't think Hammond used any really exotic tubes (valves) like the JC Hallman I owned for 25 years. A failed LS-1 killed it.
03-01-2014, 03:43 PM   #33
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: N.E. Ohio
Posts: 535
Interesting. I have a fairly recent book on the Hammonds (yet to be read) called something like "Beauty in the B's" -- it's buried somewhere here. Probably pretty useful, if I can find it. ...LS-1? A UTC "Linear Series" transformer? As for tubes, there are few I'd call "really exotic", among those still useful today, which can't be dug up on evilBay. Hence, not THAT exotic. What audio people classified as "unobtainium" back in the dark days, circa 1985, can be found listed most weeks; or obtained from the regular tube sellers. It's all a matter of market price. PM me anytime if you'd like to talk (tube) audio/guitar-MI amps -- 'audiophile' since childhood, circa 1964.
03-01-2014, 04:41 PM   #34
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Canada_Rockies's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sparwood, BC, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,200
LS-1 (my memory of the letters might be false!) was a high voltage constant output tube about 5" tall, with a takeoff for the high voltage at the top of the tube. I have lost the circuit diagrams for the old girl. It was used to feed high voltage to the capacitance pickups on the reeds. The Hallman organs used a suction reed chest, and used a high voltage capacitance circuit (not exactly like an electric guitar) to pick up the vibrations. Unlike the Wurlitzer "amplified reed" organs in the USA where all the reeds ran all the time, the reeds were keyed in JC Hallman organs. For a 1952 design, they had presence, but of course were unit organs. In the late 1980's the tube went South, and it took weeks to get a used, unwarranted replacement. Luckily it worked long enough for me to be able to go digital.

03-03-2014, 05:52 AM   #35
Pentaxian
TaoMaas's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oklahoma City
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,461
A bunch of us were cleaning out the prop room at the tv station where I used to work, when we came across an old Leslie stashed away in a corner. My boss was just going to throw it out, so I said, "I'll give you $50 for it." I probably should have just waited and dug it out of the trash later because he said, "Why...what is it?" I told him that I didn't know and just thought it was a cool piece of furniture. He wasn't buying it, so I had to fess up. Luckily, they had it serviced , got it back into working condition, and paired it back up with the Hammond organ it was supposed to go with.

I love the gear cabinet the OP created. Especially the way he organized things. I keep my gear in an old armoire and a chest of drawers. They work okay, but I need to take a lesson from the OP and make them more gear-friendly.

Last edited by TaoMaas; 03-03-2014 at 11:20 AM.
03-03-2014, 09:21 AM   #36
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
Canada_Rockies's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Sparwood, BC, Canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,200
I have a cabinet I built into a spare room in the basement, and I leave the gear loose on it. I really should add doors, but the cabinet I built with doors is full of slides and negatives that need dust protection more than cameras and lenses. And neither of them looks like that super piece of furniture the OP made. No where near.
03-03-2014, 02:20 PM   #37
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: N.E. Ohio
Posts: 535
QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
LS-1 (my memory of the letters might be false!) was a high voltage constant output tube about 5" tall, with a takeoff for the high voltage at the top of the tube. I have lost the circuit diagrams for the old girl. It was used to feed high voltage to the capacitance pickups on the reeds. The Hallman organs used a suction reed chest, and used a high voltage capacitance circuit (not exactly like an electric guitar) to pick up the vibrations. Unlike the Wurlitzer "amplified reed" organs in the USA where all the reeds ran all the time, the reeds were keyed in JC Hallman organs. For a 1952 design, they had presence, but of course were unit organs. In the late 1980's the tube went South, and it took weeks to get a used, unwarranted replacement. Luckily it worked long enough for me to be able to go digital.
Wow. I'm starting to get the picture of quite a mash-up (if that's not too impolite a way to say it) between old tech -- as in, really old! -- and, er, old "new" tech.

03-03-2014, 03:09 PM   #38
Veteran Member
magkelly's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,900
QuoteOriginally posted by Canada_Rockies Quote
I believe that desiccant is the best choice. If it is truly air tight the desiccant won't soak up very much at all, and you won't need to "cook" it dry very often.
Actually that depends upon where you live. I live in the tropics. Even with O sealed ammo boxes and supposedly decent desiccant I still ended up renewing or replacing my desiccant every month last Spring and Summer. It's very humid here most of the year. The color changing stuff was just useless. I found it just couldn't keep up with the wide temperature changes and the oppressing humidity here. I'm going to this silica cat litter that someone from my local gun range suggested. All the guys there swear by it, pack their ammo boxes with it. I figure it works for them, likely it will be great for my lenses too and goodness knows it's a lot cheaper. $4 for like 4lbs, vs $20 a quart.

This stuff...

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Mimi-Litter-Cat-Litter-4-lb-Cats/12018928

They use coffee filters to make the pouches...
03-03-2014, 09:49 PM   #39
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: N.E. Ohio
Posts: 535
QuoteOriginally posted by magkelly Quote
Actually that depends upon where you live. I live in the tropics. Even with O sealed ammo boxes and supposedly decent desiccant I still ended up renewing or replacing my desiccant every month last Spring and Summer. It's very humid here most of the year. The color changing stuff was just useless. I found it just couldn't keep up with the wide temperature changes and the oppressing humidity here. I'm going to this silica cat litter that someone from my local gun range suggested. All the guys there swear by it, pack their ammo boxes with it. I figure it works for them, likely it will be great for my lenses too and goodness knows it's a lot cheaper. $4 for like 4lbs, vs $20 a quart.

This stuff...

Get Mimi Litter: Cat Litter at an always low price from Walmart.com. Save money. Live better.

They use coffee filters to make the pouches...
Good! Thanks for the tip.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
accessories, bottom, cellulose, color, drawer, foam, gear, hammond, idea, stain, tripod
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ski holiday, lens choice, camera storage? Thor Gunderson Photographic Technique 15 02-11-2014 11:17 AM
Camera Storage and Lithium Batteries RockvilleBob Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 4 11-23-2013 07:05 AM
Storage & Protection For All My Gear RobN. Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 18 08-03-2013 01:49 PM
Camera/lens storage in a mail sorter? jesssss Photographic Industry and Professionals 7 04-11-2013 12:32 AM
Vintage camera storage Pentastic Pentax Film SLR Discussion 16 03-18-2013 09:16 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:15 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top