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07-28-2014, 06:06 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote
It is great for swapping between the DA*50-135 and DA*300.

I think that a swap between these two would always involve a bit of pressure...
Thanks for your reply--I think if I'm working out of a camera bag, then your procedure would be idea.

07-29-2014, 04:06 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by CreationBear Quote
Lens swap under field conditions
Err... a lot less scientific with me... take one off and put the other on.

Where time is of the essence, which happens when I didn't read the situation correctly and don't have the right lens on either body.

It's just a case of leave the caps off and into the Crumpler, as is and I'll sort it out later. The replacement lens with permanently mounted hood (saves time) goes straight onto the body to start shooting.
07-29-2014, 04:34 AM   #18
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I basically have a sling bag that I use to hold the lenses. I am not too fussy with putting the front lens cap on provided the hood is still on - I'll leave the front lens cap off for the photo session, but each lens has a slot in the velvet lined bag and is highly unlikely to touch anything.

Another question, though. Do you switch the camera off when you change lenses? I used to switch my camera on and off all the time (especially with my 18-135). I am now leaving it on all the time, the whole day even. It goes to sleep and I have not seen any difference in the battery life. I leave it on while I change the lens, but part of me thinks that it might not be the best. AFAIK the manual is silent on this. I'd be happy to hear other's experience.
07-29-2014, 08:43 AM   #19
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i change lenses very often while shooting, and often at the beach with blowing sand and ocean spray. On a typical sunset shoot on the beach, i may change lenses 10-20 times easily (i am using only primes). I do not worry much about sand/water intrusion as my technique is quick and effective. I never let any gear touch the ground or it can be swept away in a second. One I took off my shoes and sat them down for a moment to open my camera bag and I never saw them again.

I do have a Lowepro sling type bag which works great if i need to shelter the camera from wind. I turned the dividers sideways to allow access to all the slots from a partially opened flap.
I can complete the change inside the bag in most cases.

I do have photog friends who won't change lenses or they'll bring multiple bodies because they are paranoid of soiling their sensor/mirror, but in all the times I've exposed my mirror box to wind and elements, the debris has been easy to blow off later, knock on wood. I say, just be careful and don't worry about it.

I also use a technique where I hold both lenses in the same hand (the lens being removed and the lens being mounted). This expedites the swap and keeps my right hand free to secure the camera and press the lens release button.

07-29-2014, 09:35 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by mikeSF Quote
I also use a technique where I hold both lenses in the same hand (the lens being removed and the lens being mounted). This expedites the swap and keeps my right hand free to secure the camera and press the lens release button.

Now that's interesting, though I might not try it unless I were swapping a "pancake" like the DA21 with a DA40! At any rate, this conversation has been really valuable in helping me assess risk--I will try not to baby my gear, but I also don't want to be "that guy" in somebody else's cautionary tale (the recent "Loctite" thread on the board comes to mind...
). If you're running cameras in salt spray and rip tides, though, I don't think I have much to worry about here on high ground.
07-29-2014, 09:53 AM   #21
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Like BrianR I also use a Flipside bag. It's been great when hiking on exposed trails and near water.
07-29-2014, 10:13 AM - 2 Likes   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by CreationBear Quote
Now that's interesting, though I might not try it unless I were swapping a "pancake" like the DA21 with a DA40! At any rate, this conversation has been really valuable in helping me assess risk--I will try not to baby my gear, but I also don't want to be "that guy" in somebody else's cautionary tale (the recent "Loctite" thread on the board comes to mind...
). If you're running cameras in salt spray and rip tides, though, I don't think I have much to worry about here on high ground.
i made this video several years ago, but it is still the technique i use in the field (lenses in the sling bag) and it works with my 645 lenses (except the two biggest ones)



07-29-2014, 10:54 AM   #23
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MikeSF--


Ha, "Youtube" or it didn't happen, right? That's a great video--one take-away I got immediately was that you can rotate the camera body instead of the lens...a much better "handle" (not to mention mechanical advantage) all around.


MD Optofonik-- Thanks for the slingpack testimonial...I'm a big believer in slingpacks for a lot of applications (my "city" bag is a Arc'teryx Mistral that I usually run with my K5 in a small Crumpler inside.) While dayhiking, I'll actually throw that combo in my ruck, but on longer journeys the weight and cubes it takes up starts to tell.
07-29-2014, 08:53 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by CreationBear Quote
MikeSF--

MD Optofonik-- Thanks for the slingpack testimonial...I'm a big believer in slingpacks for a lot of applications (my "city" bag is a Arc'teryx Mistral that I usually run with my K5 in a small Crumpler inside.) While dayhiking, I'll actually throw that combo in my ruck, but on longer journeys the weight and cubes it takes up starts to tell.
Mine isn't the Slingpack, it's the Flipside. Timd and Mike SF offered the Slingpack suggestion. The Flipside allows you to drop the shoulder harness, twist the pack around your waist, open the back of the pack (the part next to your back when being worn), and use it as a work surface. Propping a leg up so it rests on your thigh offers a better sense of confidence but if it's not necessary as long as you have it adjusted correctly from the outset. It really is genius.
07-30-2014, 09:28 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by MD Optofonik Quote
It really is genius.

Very cool--I know some flyfishermen who might benefit from it in a dual-use capacity as well.
07-31-2014, 07:28 AM   #26
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I often use lenses for which the "two lenses in one hand" technique isn't usable. No matter which bag I am using, when I load out I always leave one lens holding slot open with a lens cap in the bottom. I also always have a strap on the camera any time I'll be switching lenses. That way I have both hands free and a lens cap ready to go at all times. I make sure the camera body is pointed downward and the sensor is off (no live view) to avoid static dust attraction. I swing the bag forward to minimize the distance between lenses and camera, and then switch.
07-31-2014, 08:47 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by mikeSF Quote
i made this video several years ago, but it is still the technique i use in the field (lenses in the sling bag) and it works with my 645 lenses (except the two biggest ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0YUJgwwsAA
I didn't realise that was your video Mike, I saw that a couple of years ago.

Your technique is generally what I use for all the Ltd's which are small enough to grasp firmly like that.
I'm left handed too so prefer retrieving and handling lenses in my left hand.
Have never dropped a lens yet, but I wouldn't be game to try this technique with a DA*300.


The lenses I usually carry & store facing down in a Thinktank skin pouch on a belt (have 3 different ones of those) or a shoulder bag.
Rear caps stay on but i spin these off just before retrieving the lens and replace them straight after putting back in the bag.
07-31-2014, 10:35 AM   #28
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I had never really thought about it until your question. It really depends on what I am wearing, what bag I am using and which lenses are involved. With smaller lenses and using a belt lens case I have the camera on my shoulder , twist off one lens and put the other one on after I had taken off the rear cap which then goes onto the lens that came off. I then put the front lens cap onto the removed lens and put it away and then take off the lens cap off the mounted lens. I normally put my body between the gear and the wind. I have changed lenses in crowds, at sporting events, rodeos and military expercises and the only time I thought of never changing lenses is when I was dressed in a chemical suit due ot lack of ability to carry a second lens plus the need to decon more gear.

Large lenses require more care in changing. I think the best solution to making the process as easy as possible is to not have your bag or pockets crammed full. The exchange bags look interesting however when I bought my last lens bag I decided that I did not need it as most of my lenses are small. If you use a tripod of course changing lenses is very easy
07-31-2014, 12:54 PM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by redrockcoulee Quote
I think the best solution to making the process as easy as possible is to not have your bag or pockets crammed full.

Thanks for all the replies, gents--since photography is by choice a rather solitary pursuit for me, this has been a great opportunity to look behind the scenes. (BTW, I think your observation applies to just about every bag, pouch, or ruck that I've carried--easier said than done, though.
)
08-06-2014, 08:54 AM   #30
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I follow jatrax's method pretty well exactly, but I still find I get some dust on the sensor occassionally.
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