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10-02-2015, 01:12 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by grhazelton Quote
i've been pleased with manfrotto's products. Mine is a 3001, iirc; it doesn't seem to have a model number on it. 3 sections, twist locks on the legs, center column. I have a 3030 pan tilt head with quick release fitting. I heartily recommend a qr of some sort. Just make sure that you can buy additional plates! This combo is happy with my medium format gear, a pentax 645n, a yashicamat, and the bronica s2a, a weighty stainless steel beast.

Many of us go through the c**p tripod phase. I did. You might look into used tripods; they are easy to evaluate, and any scratches they may have won't hurt their use. If you buy new you'll scratch it up anyway.
3001 = 190

---------- Post added 10-02-15 at 01:36 PM ----------

I have had an aluminum manfrotto 190/3001 with three sectioned legs for years and years and years. I have been very happy with its durability, ease of use, and strength.

I also have a carbon fiber and magnesium manfrotto 055 with three sectioned legs. It is bigger, stiffer, stronger, and lighter than my 190/3001. My 190/3001 now is mostly unused.

I am extraordinarily happy with my Manfrotto tripods. They are the amongst the best photographic buys I have made. They have lasted thru multiple systems and formats. Good tripods and heads lead to better photos. I also went thru the cr** tripod phase. That phase was just money down the drain.

My research, at the time, showed me that the manfrotto tripods were the best in terms of value, durability, and features. I would buy the same again in a heartbeat.

10-03-2015, 04:55 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Markovo Quote
In need for a new tripod
QuoteOriginally posted by Markovo Quote
and a rarеly use tripod
A bit of a contradiction going on there.

I would suggest you spending a little more than you planning and getting a sturdy secondhand beasty that will last you a lifetime, otherwise I fear your going down the same route again... albeit slightly better than before.

Last edited by Kerrowdown; 10-03-2015 at 09:57 AM.
10-03-2015, 09:03 AM   #18
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I rarely use my tripod, but when I need it, I'm very happy that I have an extremely heavy duty one, with an equally HD head on it. During the eclipse, it was a joy not to see the camera jiggle on it, and I was confident enough to leave the camera for trips into the house.

I have a TeleVue tripod that is also used for scopes for astronomy. The head is a Manfrotto #3126. Both were purchased used, and have had many years of great service for me.
10-03-2015, 09:59 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Markovo Quote
I was thinking something around 60-70$ for the tripod and the head. I have 100mm f2.8 D FA, Tamron 17-50 and Auto Chinon 50mm 1.4, not very heavy lenses and a rarеly use tripod, but it happens and it's good to have one in the bag.
Just my personal opinion: good, sturdy tripods are 1-big and heavy load; 2-quite expensive. They involve some other equipment like backpacks or bags or a specific bag to take them around safely and "comfortably". So, check the bag or backpack you already have to be sure you can store the tripod in it . My experience: my Manfrotto 055 is too tall to be secured on the front of my Tamrac Exp. 7x so I have to keep that secured filling two legs in the side of the b.pack. and the combo (p.pack, camera, lenses, tripod, water, jacket or raincoat...) Is HEAVY!!! Surely you can walk many hours with that on your shoulders but it's a matter of will. Otherwise, as you wrote that you rarely use a tripod, perhaps you'll never want to take around so much load. just search the market for a product that's suitable for your purposes and your photography.

Matteo

10-05-2015, 08:30 AM - 2 Likes   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by bm75 Quote
carbon ones are much more sensible to hurts.
thin wall graphite/carbon fiber is easily damaged.
small dings when stressed can end badly.

if you notice a ding try forcing epoxy into the fracture. let it dry...completely. then you can work the patch flush with the surface of the tube.

with a dent...disassemble the leg...work the protruding fiber to the surface (a hardwood dowel with a rounded end works great) .
if the fiber is not torn use the above technique.
otherwise lay an epoxy film over the dent/hole, wrap white thread or polyester monofilament over the damaged area. you can find pictures of the wrapping technique by searching for fishing rod wrapping.
wipe the excess glue off.
let it dry.
work a very thin coat of epoxy over the patch.
to avoid lumps you will need to rotate the tube until the glue dries.
the thread will disappear more or less.
you will have a tube with almost original strength.

I've used this technique to fix arrows, fishing rods and even tripod legs.
regular epoxy works fine, rod wrapping epoxy works much better..it seems to retain some flex and does not yellow.
10-05-2015, 11:04 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by ccc_ Quote
thin wall graphite/carbon fiber is easily damaged.
small dings when stressed can end badly.

if you notice a ding try forcing epoxy into the fracture. let it dry...completely. then you can work the patch flush with the surface of the tube.

with a dent...disassemble the leg...work the protruding fiber to the surface (a hardwood dowel with a rounded end works great) .
if the fiber is not torn use the above technique.
otherwise lay an epoxy film over the dent/hole, wrap white thread or polyester monofilament over the damaged area. you can find pictures of the wrapping technique by searching for fishing rod wrapping.
wipe the excess glue off.
let it dry.
work a very thin coat of epoxy over the patch.
to avoid lumps you will need to rotate the tube until the glue dries.
the thread will disappear more or less.
you will have a tube with almost original strength.

I've used this technique to fix arrows, fishing rods and even tripod legs.
regular epoxy works fine, rod wrapping epoxy works much better..it seems to retain some flex and does not yellow.
thanks so much for the info. As said in my post, I use metal tripods but at work there could be some CF ones. Good news to know they could be repaired. Thanks for the post! Best regards. Matteo
10-12-2015, 07:04 AM   #22
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So i've went for the chinese tripod from Aliexpress (Q666 Professional Aluminum Alloy Tripod Monopod Kit For DSLR Camera / Portable Traveling Tripod Max Load 15kg / Free Shipping-in Tripods from Consumer Electronics on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group) and it came today via DHL Free Shipping. First of all, it is massive. The ball head is huge and the whole tripod is very stiff. The build quality is good and it is about 2 kilograms in weight. I'm verry happy with the price too!

10-12-2015, 01:20 PM   #23
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I purchased one of those ebay special no-name-brand tripods that turned into a Mono-pod about 15 years ago and I still use it on occasion. This tripod could also be broken down into a very compact portable package. Even came with a tripod carrying case. The bad thing about this tripod was the head. The head could not hold more than 2 pounds max. Other than that and for the money it served it's purpose.
10-13-2015, 09:19 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by goldenarrow Quote
Been looking at the model one step up from this one. Sirui any good??? They use forged aluminum in many of their tripods. This one is a little too short for my needs.
Sirui T-1005X 5-Section Aluminum Tripod BSRT1005 B&H Photo Video
I have a Sirui for when I need to travel light but I purchased a slightly bigger and sturdier travel tripod when we went to Scotland as did not trust the Sirui with the Hasselblad and the winds. I forget the brand though.

For when I am not travelling by air I have Manfrottos 190 and 055 however I also use the 055 for large format cameras. A good sturdy tripod for most times and a good folding tripod for when you need to travel light are a great combo. I also need more tripods than others may need as my wife also shoots LF, MF and pinhole cameras as well both of us shoot Pentax film and digitals.
10-13-2015, 05:58 PM   #25
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I am also in the market for a tripod. I've been watching eBay on Manfrotto 3011, 3021, and 3221 models (used)...

Anybody with experience with any of these models?
10-13-2015, 07:21 PM   #26
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The 3021 and 3221 are bogen distribution numbers for the manfrotto 055 family. I think the x2xx indicates black color legs, with x0xx for bright. The 055 model is highly thought of here. I have the "Pro" model with carbon fiber three section legs. I would buy it again in a heartbeat.

The 190/3001 series postpends a "B" to the 3001 to indicate black. Why bogen did not just use the manfrotto model numbers, I don't know. Maybe they think us Americans need a different set of model numbers than the rest of the world.
10-13-2015, 07:59 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by lmd91343 Quote
The 3021 and 3221 are bogen distribution numbers for the manfrotto 055 family. I think the x2xx indicates black color legs, with x0xx for bright. The 055 model is highly thought of here. I have the "Pro" model with carbon fiber three section legs. I would buy it again in a heartbeat.

The 190/3001 series postpends a "B" to the 3001 to indicate black. Why bogen did not just use the manfrotto model numbers, I don't know. Maybe they think us Americans need a different set of model numbers than the rest of the world.
gotcha - I've seen both numbers and didn't realize that one set was for Bogen and the other Manfrotto; I'm also considering the 074/3033 model as well...
10-13-2015, 09:55 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by pepperberry farm Quote
gotcha - I've seen both numbers and didn't realize that one set was for Bogen and the other Manfrotto; I'm also considering the 074/3033 model as well...
I have shared with you about 90% of my manfrotto and bogen model number cross reference knowledge. I do not know the model numbers you have mentioned.
10-14-2015, 10:47 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by lmd91343 Quote
The 3021 and 3221 are bogen distribution numbers for the manfrotto 055 family. I think the x2xx indicates black color legs, with x0xx for bright. The 055 model is highly thought of here. I have the "Pro" model with carbon fiber three section legs. I would buy it again in a heartbeat.

The 190/3001 series postpends a "B" to the 3001 to indicate black. Why bogen did not just use the manfrotto model numbers, I don't know. Maybe they think us Americans need a different set of model numbers than the rest of the world.
Converted from metric to Imperial serial numbers, perhaps?
10-14-2015, 11:43 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by mattb123 Quote
Converted from metric to Imperial serial numbers, perhaps?
Probably
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