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05-14-2016, 07:12 AM   #16
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Get the kit of three filters (one, two, and three stops) to fit the largest lens in your bag. Get step-down rings to adapt to the smaller lenses.
I use a two-stop or three-stop more often than a one-stop. I recommend B+W for threaded filters.

05-15-2016, 04:35 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by FantasticMrFox Quote
Yes, that's for landscapes. But many use weak NDs for portraiture. If you want to get a shallow DOF portrait at f/1.4 in bright sunlight, your camera's fastest shutter speed might not cut it, so you can use an ND2 or ND4 to bring it down a notch.

Another thing is timelapse, where you might want to achieve a shutter speed anywhere between 0.5 sec. and 2 sec. An ND1000 might already be overkill for that except for on the brightest, cloudless days.
I'm liking 15 seconds to 30 seconds for landscapes with water and especially for night time shots so that traffic becomes nothing but a set of light trails. During the day you can also make moving objects (like other tourists) vanish completely with such long exposure times. Of course it does depend what you're trying to achieve as a previous poster has already said, if you only want 0.5 to 2 seconds then the 6 stop would be better. I still intend to get the ND1000 for the full 10 stops so I can get longer exposures even in sunny conditions.

Last edited by Fire Angel; 05-15-2016 at 04:40 PM.
05-15-2016, 06:04 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Fire Angel Quote
I'm liking 15 seconds to 30 seconds for landscapes with water and especially for night time shots so that traffic becomes nothing but a set of light trails. During the day you can also make moving objects (like other tourists) vanish completely with such long exposure times. Of course it does depend what you're trying to achieve as a previous poster has already said, if you only want 0.5 to 2 seconds then the 6 stop would be better. I still intend to get the ND1000 for the full 10 stops so I can get longer exposures even in sunny conditions.
10 stops isn't enough in sunny conditions. I'm considering another 10 stop (20 stops total) to mount on the front of my 10 stop NDF.

In full sun, a 10 stop is probably going to net you around 1/25s at best at ISO 80 and f/16 or so.. many lenses on digital tend to do better around f/8 to f/11 so I'll be looking into more stoppage than just a plain 10 stopper.

One other thing, you'll want to fashion some sort of plug for the viewfinder because it WILL throw off the exposure with a large stop NDF.
05-16-2016, 11:20 AM   #19
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An 8x is the strongest ND I have ever owned and very rarely need it. 4x is much more useful to me. It is plenty to allow a larger aperture for portraits in bright conditions especially with modern cameras that have shutter speeds of 1/8000 (or faster). Even so, a full sun exposure at f/1.4 and ISO 100 would be just fine at 1/8000 shutter speed without a ND. The best filter of all time is a polarizer and it can act very nicely as a ND as well.

ND 8x, 10x or higher filters are most useful in allowing slow shutter speeds to show movement in water, wind etc.

05-16-2016, 11:30 AM   #20
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The game has changed a bit with digital - the lighter ones are not much use as the digital filters on LR or whatever or the dynamic range of the camera can do the job perfectly well with RAW files. On the other hand, the difference between sky and land is seldom more than 3 stops - so if you're using a graduated filter I'd say 3 stops, if you're not, you'll want a bigger effect so 4.5 or 7 maybe. !0 is quite extreme, though it has its uses, you can't see anything through the camera with it on, so it's quite fiddly to use. If you use a grad to hold back the shy, it's worth using one like Lee which is rectangular so you can use the top as a straight ND filter if you want.
05-16-2016, 05:58 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by ffking Quote
!0 is quite extreme, though it has its uses, you can't see anything through the camera with it on, so it's quite fiddly to use.
You can use Liveview with a 10 stop ND. Both the k-3II and the k-1 will also auto-focus using Liveview with a 10 stop ND. And the subject is quite visible for composition. Through the viewfinder though is as you say not usable.
05-17-2016, 12:01 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
You can use Liveview with a 10 stop ND. Both the k-3II and the k-1 will also auto-focus using Liveview with a 10 stop ND. And the subject is quite visible for composition. Through the viewfinder though is as you say not usable.
mmm - that's something I suppose - presumably only if the filter doesn't take the light below -2 to -3 EV? The other thing if you're leaving the filter on is exposure times -I suppose if it's longer than 30s you'd have to up the ISO to get a reading then calculate the time for a lower ISO then use bulb for the exposure?

05-17-2016, 09:28 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by ffking Quote
The other thing if you're leaving the filter on is exposure times -I suppose if it's longer than 30s you'd have to up the ISO to get a reading then calculate the time for a lower ISO then use bulb for the exposure?
I just put the camera on the tripod, turn on Liveview, adjust aperture and ISO to get the indicated speed I want, press the AF button and take the image. But those are for shots of less than 30 seconds. For longer, yes your method works or use an intervalometer to time the shot once you have calculated the exposure.

You do need to cover the view finder as stray light entering through it will affect the exposure calculation. I made a small plastic cover that slides under the eye cup to prevent light entering.

Check this thread: https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/172-pentax-k-3/318435-k-3-underexposes-nd-filter.html
06-08-2016, 07:38 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by mee Quote
10 stops isn't enough in sunny conditions. I'm considering another 10 stop (20 stops total) to mount on the front of my 10 stop NDF.

In full sun, a 10 stop is probably going to net you around 1/25s at best at ISO 80 and f/16 or so.. many lenses on digital tend to do better around f/8 to f/11 so I'll be looking into more stoppage than just a plain 10 stopper.

One other thing, you'll want to fashion some sort of plug for the viewfinder because it WILL throw off the exposure with a large stop NDF.
Yeah, I bought some black Plasticard and cut it to fit the eyecup opening. It slots in firmly and stays put reasonably well until it wears, then I cut another. I am looking into buying a sheet of black High Density ABS instead as it is much more durable.
06-10-2016, 10:01 AM   #25
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5-10 steps, because aperture, ISO or shutter speed accounts for quite some steps of adjustment depending on how I prioritize. To make a real impact I would have at least 5 stops, but not overdoing it by having more then 10 stops of ND.
06-10-2016, 05:07 PM   #26
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Avoid variable ND filters . . .

https://jonasraskphotography.com/2014/05/12/nd-filter-dont-go-variable/

I use B&W and Singh-Ray. I do have a B&W ND Vario 1-5 stop but must admit I've not used it much. I use the B&W 10-stop now and again. Might pick-up a 6-stop. Of all the filters, I use the B&W CPL Nano Kasemann and Singh-Ray Gold 'n Blue the most.
06-15-2016, 09:05 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by dhodgeh Quote
How many stops of light reduction would you select?

Going to be in the SW US and I know some of our destinations will be visited during the middle of the day. So I'm thinking a good ND filter will be needed in the kit.

Just not sure where to start as far as density is concerned.

TIA
What are you shooting and what what do you hope to accomplish with the ND filter?
06-15-2016, 09:16 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by HopelessTogger Quote
Avoid variable ND filters . . .

https://jonasraskphotography.com/2014/05/12/nd-filter-dont-go-variable/

I use B&W and Singh-Ray. I do have a B&W ND Vario 1-5 stop but must admit I've not used it much. I use the B&W 10-stop now and again. Might pick-up a 6-stop. Of all the filters, I use the B&W CPL Nano Kasemann and Singh-Ray Gold 'n Blue the most.
So don't go variable if you are using a ND filter for wide open daylight shots with bokeh. I use a decent variable for landscapes to slow the shutter speeds and have had good results because I always shoot those kinds of shots stopped down.
Good info but it may not apply to landscape shooters.
06-15-2016, 09:22 AM   #29
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I use a breakthrough photography nd6 stopper. By far the best in the market. Tack sharp and soooo neutral.
06-15-2016, 10:53 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by mattb123 Quote
So don't go variable if you are using a ND filter for wide open daylight shots with bokeh. I use a decent variable for landscapes to slow the shutter speeds and have had good results because I always shoot those kinds of shots stopped down.
Good info but it may not apply to landscape shooters.
Must say I haven't used the B&W 1-5 Vario much, so can't really confirm.

When I stack circular filters I get all sorts of problems. Especially the Big Stopper with the Singh-Ray Gold 'n Blue.
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