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05-29-2016, 04:35 PM   #16
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UV filters are useful in the situations that they are intended for - high amounts of blue light scatter. You find blue light scatter at high altitudes, light fog or scenes which have large amounts of open water. There are digital image examples that show the effect of these filters.

05-29-2016, 05:20 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Not a Number Quote
There are digital image examples that show the effect of these filters.
I remember reading an article about this, something about UV filters still useful. But I've found a CPL to do an even better job. Of course with a ultra wide angle the CPL has it's own issues so maybe it's time to try a UV filter for this.
05-29-2016, 05:54 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by sherrvonne Quote
Hopefully I'm not asking a stupid question: Can you tell just looking at it on the camera review screen or is it necessary to look at it in raw from a computer view screen in Lightroom etc?

Maybe it becomes that obvious.


People who use home-made flash diffusers can also find that the 'white' plastic they're using also creates a colour cast. Ditto for continuous lighting.
05-30-2016, 05:44 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by sherrvonne Quote
Hopefully I'm not asking a stupid question: Can you tell just looking at it on the camera review screen or is it necessary to look at it in raw from a computer view screen in Lightroom etc?
Depends on how 'off' it is, subtle colour casts are tougher to check on the cameras screen especially in bright light.

A colour calibration chart is a good option if you want high accuracy across various lenses, lighting and filter combos.

06-03-2016, 05:01 AM   #20
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I'm no fan of protection filters for general use, but I agree that in some situations they have their use.

I'm thinking sea breeze which sprays salty water all over. When photographing seascapes I mostly use a ND filter anyway to slow down shutter speeds, so that protects without an additional filter. Same with waterfalls. However, for wildlife photography at sea I have used a Hoya Clear Glass filter on my lens as protection.

Wildlife photography is the one application where I do not put my lens cap on between shots, so not to lose time. In most other cases the lens cap is my protection. In addition to that, for collision protection I find a hard lens hood much more effective, esp on long lenses.

Other filters that might be useful are filters that achieve results not possible in post processing. I'm thinking:
- Infrared filters for near-infrared photography (my wife hates this...)
- Polarizers for eliminating reflections (not for anything else to my feeling)
- Didymium filter, which cuts out orange sodium light, which can improve night street photography in general and astrophotography near habitation more specifically
- ND filters: to lengthen exposures.
There may be others, but the above is what I use...

One tip: for special purpose filters like the above list, the cheapest solution is to buy good filters in the filter size of your largest lens, and use cheap step-up rings to mount them on the smaller lenses. This has one down side: most likely the lens hoods won't fit over the larger filter, so care must be taken to shield the sun or any bright light sources manually.

hth, Wim

Last edited by Ishpuini; 06-03-2016 at 05:10 AM.
06-03-2016, 09:47 AM - 1 Like   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ishpuini Quote
This has one down side: most likely the lens hoods won't fit over the larger filter, so care must be taken to shield the sun or any bright light sources manually.
Which is why you also carry a rubber collapsible lens hood to fit the larger sized filter. I know, more stuff to carry, but it can save the day on a shot with flare potential!
06-03-2016, 08:15 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ishpuini Quote
I'm no fan of protection filters for general use, but I agree that in some situations they have their use.

I'm thinking sea breeze which sprays salty water all over. When photographing seascapes I mostly use a ND filter anyway to slow down shutter speeds, so that protects without an additional filter. Same with waterfalls. However, for wildlife photography at sea I have used a Hoya Clear Glass filter on my lens as protection.

Wildlife photography is the one application where I do not put my lens cap on between shots, so not to lose time. In most other cases the lens cap is my protection. In addition to that, for collision protection I find a hard lens hood much more effective, esp on long lenses.

Other filters that might be useful are filters that achieve results not possible in post processing. I'm thinking:
- Infrared filters for near-infrared photography (my wife hates this...)
- Polarizers for eliminating reflections (not for anything else to my feeling)
- Didymium filter, which cuts out orange sodium light, which can improve night street photography in general and astrophotography near habitation more specifically
- ND filters: to lengthen exposures.
There may be others, but the above is what I use...

One tip: for special purpose filters like the above list, the cheapest solution is to buy good filters in the filter size of your largest lens, and use cheap step-up rings to mount them on the smaller lenses. This has one down side: most likely the lens hoods won't fit over the larger filter, so care must be taken to shield the sun or any bright light sources manually.

hth, Wim
Which brands of Didymium filter do you know? I just saw Hoya. and about Portrait filters, looks similar.

06-04-2016, 02:16 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by Genki Quote
Which brands of Didymium filter do you know? I just saw Hoya. and about Portrait filters, looks similar.
I looked at the Hoya too, but couldn't get it in Europe. Then I found one by B+W (491 Redhancer). Apparently they don't make these anymore, but they can be found in stock here and there.

There's a few others. For great information on this, there is a great article on lonelyspeck.com.

Hth, Wim
06-10-2016, 08:13 AM   #24
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I have a Hoya 10 stop ND filter for long exposure shooting and a Hoya UV/protection filter to avoid contamination/damage if needed. Normal lighted shooting in a safe area I do not use any filter to avoid image degradation.
06-10-2016, 08:50 AM - 1 Like   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by newmikey Quote
+1

UV and so-called "protection" filters are expensive nonsense.
That's true until you wish you had it - my dad shattered his UV (I think) filter, but his lens was fine...
06-10-2016, 09:49 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by IgorZ Quote
That's true until you wish you had it - my dad shattered his UV (I think) filter, but his lens was fine...
We've gone over this so many times it's just not funny any more. The risk of you scratching the front element of your lens with these razor-sharp shards of filterglass is way higher than the remote chance such a flimsy piece of glass might actually protect your front element against even the slightest impact. I have not damaged a front element in more than 40 years of shooting (always with lenshood but never with a filter).

Impact never was and never is a reason to use a filter, blowing sand and water spray might be under particular (and rare) circumstances. Wiping a filter is just as likely to cause image degradation as wiping the front element of a lens with inappropriate materials such as pieces of clothing or tissuepaper which can degrade or flake off coatings.

Filters must have a photographic use - beyond that, they are utterly useless and potentially damaging to both images and equipment.
06-10-2016, 11:02 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by newmikey Quote
We've gone over this so many times it's just not funny any more. The risk of you scratching the front element of your lens with these razor-sharp shards of filterglass is way higher than the remote chance such a flimsy piece of glass might actually protect your front element against even the slightest impact. I have not damaged a front element in more than 40 years of shooting (always with lenshood but never with a filter).

Impact never was and never is a reason to use a filter, blowing sand and water spray might be under particular (and rare) circumstances. Wiping a filter is just as likely to cause image degradation as wiping the front element of a lens with inappropriate materials such as pieces of clothing or tissuepaper which can degrade or flake off coatings.

Filters must have a photographic use - beyond that, they are utterly useless and potentially damaging to both images and equipment.
It might not be funny, but my dad is smiling.

Having said that, I only use polarizers and ND filters and not all the time, and I agree with you that they can be damaging to images - I have experienced that first hand.
06-10-2016, 11:24 AM   #28
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No filter is best. I always use a lens-hood, however. That will protect from impacts, rain, etc. Also, the modern coatings seem to be tougher and probably require less protection from abrasions etc. Get a Rocket blower for dust etc.

---------- Post added 06-10-16 at 01:27 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by IgorZ Quote
That's true until you wish you had it - my dad shattered his UV (I think) filter, but his lens was fine...
But, did he have a lens hood on it? Probably not.
06-14-2016, 11:59 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
Maybe it becomes that obvious.


People who use home-made flash diffusers can also find that the 'white' plastic they're using also creates a colour cast. Ditto for continuous lighting.
What you think about Didymium filters? Like B+W Redhancer 491 or maybe Hoya Intensifier (Red Enhancer) Filter
06-14-2016, 01:15 PM   #30
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Understand, that filters do not ADD anything, they take away (hence their name "filter"). So a Red Enhancement filter is taking away Blue and Green. I bring this up because with digital, you can "enhance" the Red by just tweaking down the Blue and Green when you edit with software. The only filters you cannot duplicate in digital software are Polarizers, and some special effects filters (which if you try hard enough, you can duplicate most of these!). ND filters are good to reduce light when ISO100 is still too much (we can go to ISO 1 zillion now, how come ISO 50 or 25 can't be included???). To make my life easier in the editing arena, graduated ND filters are nice to reduce light in some areas of the image. If you use colored filters, make certain you are not on Auto White Balance. It will kind of negate the effect!

Regards,
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