Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-04-2016, 01:46 PM   #16
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Dartmoor Dave's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Dartmoor, UK
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,295
QuoteOriginally posted by Kerrowdown Quote
Follow my link below, I still use this to this very day. Sangamo Weston Light Meter Weston Master V reviews - Pentax Camera Accessory Review Database

The Westons are a pure joy to use, and exquisite just as objects to hold. I still use my ancient Master IV sometimes just for the sheer pleasure of it, and it still gives identical readings to my digital Sekonic. And I'll always insist that the Weston invercone will beat any simple incident metering dome any day.

06-04-2016, 02:32 PM   #17
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
slip's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 2 hours north of toronto ontario canada
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,537
I have a been using a Shepherd/Polaris lightmeter that can be bought cheap on ebay. very basic, digital, does the job

Randy
06-04-2016, 03:41 PM   #18
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 4,600
I've used hand held meters for almost 50 years. I've got three, all Sekonic. They've been very good.

My newest one (purchased April of this year) is a Sekonic L-398A Studio Master lll. No battery, which I like, works well, based on the old Hollywood Norwood Director Meter.

I also like the fact that when I take a reading, I have at a glance a whole array of different shutter speeds/ F stops settings I can use. Do I want lot's of depth or field, or not...do I want fast or slow...or something in between as far as a shutter speed goes ? It's there...all at a glance.

I also like it's old time, traditional 'look'.

I've been using it a lot with both my Pentax K-5 and K10D. So far, very happy with it's performance.

I do recommend it.


https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=...IItBe5gr6BHkeA
06-04-2016, 05:31 PM   #19
Senior Member




Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Overland Park, KS via North Carolina
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 188
I've been happy with the Minolta Flash Meter V for both incident and flash metering. It uses a single AA battery and they can be found on e-bay at reasonable prices if you look around carefully. The Minolta IVF is very similar and also uses AA batteries.

06-10-2016, 12:06 PM   #20
Veteran Member




Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
Photos: Albums
Posts: 302
Think about a Pentax Spotmeter

I find a spotmeter to be most useful, you can take several readings of a scene and average them or expose for highlights etc It is what Ansel Adams used. The Pentax Digital is the best one, though also the most expensive selling for $300-$500. Compact, accurate. I have owned one for 30 years now. The Pentax V is larger and can be had for a bit over $100. The company Zone VI made a great belt case for both of them. The Zone VI modified meter is adjusted for color response so you can take readings through b&w filters (film).
06-10-2016, 12:49 PM   #21
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigDave's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,726
Spot meters are great tools, but for me they have become a bit redundant. Shooting with a K7, K5, K3 or K1 you can assign the camera to meter in spot mode, as apposed to some kind of averaging. I have it always set to center spot. I meter a few different areas in the scene with the camera, set the exposure based on these readings and I am good to go! The rest is done in editing SW anyway. If using a camera that does not have this feature, then a spot meter is invaluable. Yes, the spot meter will have a smaller area that would be measured, in general, but the method described works!
06-12-2016, 02:47 AM   #22
Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2015
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 6,119
Original Poster
Given that the intended use is with film cameras which at worst will be shot unmetered and at best are scene-averaging, a spotmeter would actually be a big advantage. I agree that a nice tight zoom lens with spot-metering setting on a DSLR makes them more or less redundant, but it depends on how precise that "spot" on the DSLR is. The Pentax spot meters have something like a one degree coverage and might for all I know be more precise in some cases.

For pure retro fun, I ended up picking an Agfa Lucimeter on e-bay, a VERY simple affair which will do most of what I want a hand-held meter to do and is selenium based, so I can operate completely battery-free. How accurate (or not) it is after 50 odd years, I do not know - but for what it cost me I was willing to take a gamble. If I end up using it a lot, I will consider investing in the modern selenium-cell sekonic beast.
06-12-2016, 09:21 AM   #23
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
pacerr's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Henry, TN
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,954
QuoteOriginally posted by pathdoc Quote
How accurate (or not) it is after 50 odd years, I do not know
Nor do I, but it's stated that selenium cells age and change over time.

My solution (before I got lazy and began to rely on TTL metering modes) was to cross-calibrate a given TTL body+lens with a particular handheld meter for the type of scenes for which I was likely to use the handheld meter.

Since that was almost exclusively for incident (rather than reflected) light situations there was considerable difference in readings but direct comparison of digital results allowed reliable outcomes even with film.

I still find it useful to tweak an incident light reading using the instant review and histogram feature for outdoor activities where overall lighting doesn't change but when zooming can affect the FOV of the TTL metering. Especially useful when using manual exposure modes to track action.

06-13-2016, 12:49 PM   #24
Pentaxian
ChrisPlatt's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Rockaway Beach NYC
Posts: 5,284
Gossen meters I used were as large and heavy as some pocket 35mm cameras I own!
Sekonic meters are smaller and lighter.

I have a little Sekonic L-86 selenium meter that's as accurate now as when new in the mid-1970's.

http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meters/meters/sekonic_l86.html

Like many selenium models it reads reflected light only and has a rather wide angle of acceptance.
But if used with a gray card or merely pointed down a bit to exclude too much bright sky it works fine.

I also own its apparent replacement, the Sekonic L-188.
It's just as simple but uses a CdS cell and one 1.5V 44/76/357 button battery.

http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meters/meters/sekonic_l188.html

The only shoe-mount meter I own is a Vivitar 24 CdS.
It is battery dependent (uses one button cell), and reads a surprisingly narrow area (semi-spot).

Chris
06-13-2016, 03:37 PM   #25
Pentaxian




Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 4,600
QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisPlatt Quote
Gossen meters I used were as large and heavy as some pocket 35mm cameras I own!
Sekonic meters are smaller and lighter.

I have a little Sekonic L-86 selenium meter that's as accurate now as when new in the mid-1970's.

http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meters/meters/sekonic_l86.html

Like many selenium models it reads reflected light only and has a rather wide angle of acceptance.
But if used with a gray card or merely pointed down a bit to exclude too much bright sky it works fine.

I also own its apparent replacement, the Sekonic L-188.
It's just as simple but uses a CdS cell and one 1.5V 44/76/357 button battery.

http://www.jollinger.com/photo/meters/meters/sekonic_l188.html

The only shoe-mount meter I own is a Vivitar 24 CdS.
It is battery dependent (uses one button cell), and reads a surprisingly narrow area (semi-spot).

Chris

I own an L 86. Bought it in 1968, when I got my Pentax S1a. I tried it out a couple of months ago....still dead on accurate and it uses no battery. I decided to get my Sekonic L-398A, Studio Master lll....as it also needs no battery. My L 248 needs a battery, an unavailable, mercury battery and I don't want to get another meter that requires a battery, hence the L-398A.

The L 86 meter case, a light leather case with a metal button clip on....still exists. These little L 86's were cheap ($ 9.95 CAD) in '68 and after 48 years of service, with no trouble, I would say I definitely got my money's worth with this meter.
06-28-2016, 11:42 AM   #26
Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2015
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 6,119
Original Poster
UPDATE:

For the pure archaic fun of it, I gambled a smallish sum on a thing called an Agfa Lucimeter. It claims to be incident and reflected, but in my experimentation so far I have noticed no difference between the readings with the opalescent diffuser on or off the light cell.

More to the point, though, every reading I have so far taken with it (admittedly not many) has produced a picture which - when shot in manual mode with the recommended settings on my K-5 - has produced either a correct exposure or one close enough that it could be fixed up in post without major dramas. More experience is required before I fully trust it with an unmetered film camera, but initial experiments are showing promise.

At some stage I will probably buy a Sekonic L308S so I can meter with flash. But for now this will do for entertainment value and gaining experience.
06-28-2016, 12:07 PM   #27
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigDave's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,726
FYI, if you are new to using a handheld meter with both incident diffuser and reflection modes, for the incident diffuser, face the diffuser toward the camera in a lighting situation similar to the subject. In studio you would do this measurement at the subject. For the reflection mode, measure off a gray card (18%) or Caucasian skin, which is also 18% reflectance (about). For dark skin, open up one stop and the exposure should be good.

Regards,
06-28-2016, 04:06 PM   #28
Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2015
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 6,119
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by BigDave Quote
if you are new to using a handheld meter
I certainly am; on the other hand, I have also been watching every YouTube vid I can find on the subject! Some say meter toward the camera, others toward the light. The latter usually give fairly good reasoning why they are doing this (mostly it's for flash calculations when balancing multiple studio flashes, with a suitable meter and the lumisphere retracted).

Further experimentation tonight yielded stunningly accurate results for a 1950's-vintage selenium cell unit I can conceal in my palm. I will be trying all variations of where to point it and determining by experiment/seeing for myself what works best and under which circumstances. It seems to fail in both very bright outdoors and very dim indoors light, but this is only to be expected - besides, in the former, Sunny 16 usually saves me; in the latter, I should be using flash anyway.
06-28-2016, 04:23 PM   #29
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
AquaDome's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: New Carlisle, IN
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,475
I have a Gossen Digiflash 2 that I check all my older meters against.
06-28-2016, 05:19 PM   #30
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
BigDave's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,726
The meter should work in very bright conditions, if you use it correctly. The reflection set-up of the meter is designed to give a correct exposure with an 18% reflectance standard (subject) to meter against. Why? Not entirely sure, but this is what the folks at Kodak used many many years ago and it is what all reflection meters are now calibrated for. A meter does not know what the subject is, only the light coming back to it. If you meter a white sample, you will get an exposure that produces a medium gray. If you meter a dark sample, same thing, medium gray. If you meter a white sample, open up a stop or two for a good exposure. Meter a dark, close down a stop or so.

This is what is nice about an incident meter/the incident setting. It always meters for an 18% gray. Whites will fall into the white area of the image, dark into the dark areas. The trick is getting a representation of the light falling on the subject. Easy in the studio or when you are close to the subject, not so easy in landscape photography. And in digital, your dynamic range in the image is still tighter than film, so slight biases toward the light or dark can be more noticeable. In digital, always go lighter than darker.

Keep using the meter and get used to it and you will learn where the meter is best positioned and best applied.

Enjoy!
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
light, tripod
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
hand held light meters? JLW Non-Pentax Cameras: Canon, Nikon, etc. 3 08-14-2013 09:54 PM
Hand held spot meters? NaClH2O Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 4 08-24-2009 08:31 AM
Hand Held Meter mysterick Photographic Technique 6 12-09-2008 04:15 AM
Hand held light meters squarerigger Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 19 07-02-2007 09:51 AM
Need for hand-held light meters? Ash Pentax DSLR Discussion 14 05-16-2007 05:08 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:44 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top