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09-22-2017, 03:24 AM   #46
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dartmoor Dave Quote
1: Incident meter (Sekonic L-308S). Personally it's an essential rather than just an accessory.

2: Clear plastic "ziplock" bag to keep the light meter dry when I'm shooting in rain and mist. The camera and lens have their own weatherproofing.

3: Reading glasses on a lanyard around my neck. They're never going to win any fashion awards, but nowadays I can't do anything closer than arms length without them.

I concur with the large plastic bag and glasses on a string

I recently went to a MLB game. In the past I found my self worrying about what would happen if I put the camera or other stuff under my seat. This time I got smart and had a giant plastic resealable bag which was large enough to place my camera gear and rain gear. This time I didn't have to worry about the person behind and above me spilling his drink or food onto my stuff.

09-22-2017, 08:33 AM - 1 Like   #47
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A hat that puts the viewfinder in shade no matter how I turn my head or the camera.

A breeze to keep me cool that doesn't jostle things I'm taking close-ups of.

Gloves with nearly zero thickness that would keep my hands warm for cold weather shooting.
09-22-2017, 06:25 PM - 2 Likes   #48
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Only three?

It depends on what I am doing!

Historically, going back to the late 1960s, here are the three that the practical aspects of getting the shot...

1) Tripod...when you need one, you need one and very little is more frustrating than to have one that is inadequate or wrong for the purpose.

2) Appropriate lens hoods...unless they shadow the flash, they are always used.

3) Camera/lens outer protection. Much as they have been ridiculed, the traditional ever-ready case returned much more value than the $15 extra spent at purchase time to protect camera and lens. I often credit those cases with the excellent condition much vintage cameras are found in and wish the design of modern digital SLRs were agreeable to something similar. Similarly, the cases and wraps used for lenses save them from much damage. A good gear bag is a wonderful thing and if appropriately sized, can help keep the photographer from packing too much kit

Beyond these three:

-- Some sort of off-camera shutter release. For film photography, that has usually meant a traditional mechanical cable release. On my dSLRs, a wired release or IR device work well. A cell-phone app is only as good as that device's battery.

-- Quality filters...Yes, the need is somewhat reduced with digital photography, but when you need one, you need one and if it is inferior, it is worse than nothing.

-- A simple and easy to use electronic flash. For years, I packed a small Vivitar 2000 unit with hot shoe and PC cord sync as well as dual range auto-thyristor automation. Were it not for its high trigger voltage, I would be using it still on my K-3. I have yet to find a unit with similar functionality to supplement the merely adequate built-in flash on that camera. My AF280T comes close but with a significant weight/size penalty.


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09-23-2017, 02:40 AM - 1 Like   #49
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
Much as they have been ridiculed, the traditional ever-ready case returned much more value than the $15 extra spent at purchase time to protect camera and lens. I often credit those cases with the excellent condition much vintage cameras are found in and wish the design of modern digital SLRs were agreeable to something similar.

+1 for the ever-ready case. When I first went digital I spent hours trying to find a DSLR equivalent, and I'd still snap one up immediately if they became available.

09-23-2017, 03:14 AM   #50
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  1. Extra film
  2. Spare batteries
  3. Lens tissue

Life was so much simpler in pre-digital times...

Chris
09-23-2017, 04:47 AM   #51
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question time

in February my wife and I will be spending time in the Sea of Cortez ( Gulf of California ) and the San Ignacio Lagoon in 22 foot open boats looking for whales

anyone have experience with using dry bags and want to tell me about it

any other ideas re: protection from water

already planning on large sealable plastic bag at a minimum

if you want, you can reply to this thread so we don't hijack this one

https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/10-pentax-slr-lens-discussion/348199-loo...alifornia.html



thanks
09-23-2017, 08:41 AM   #52
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Camera bag (in my case a backpack)
Tripod
Cable release or remote release.

11-10-2017, 03:42 PM - 1 Like   #53
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Very late to the party, so I'll try to go for less mentioned things - not bags, not filters, not tripods, nor triggers... My main type of shooting is in-situ flash macro, so that perhaps orients my vision.

1) Knee pads. You can buy this, usually, where gardening supplies and tools are sold. Super useful to kneel down in many places that would otherwise chafe your knees! Kneeling down allows me to have a much more stable platform from which to shoot, and to get more "level" shots of bugs, rather than always looking down at them. (Sometimes I'll lie down too, but not all surfaces are amenable to this.)

2) Horizontal flash bracket. In shooting macro, getting the flash head closer to the critter allows the use of lower flash power as well as smaller diffusion surfaces (to get equivalently soft light) - see this article by our very own Nass. Some people use small ballheads to achieve this, but I love the simplicity and robustness of the adapter I'm using. I can no longer find it on Ebay, so I hope it doesn't break any time soon! Looking at an old macro rig photo of mine (below), I can see that I've since swapped out the camera body, the lens(es), the flash, the flash trigger, (sometimes) the diffusion and (sometimes) the L-bracket. But that horizontal flash bracket has always been on every single rig.



3) I wanted to say a flash, but that seems a little too obvious! So instead, I'll say either an external power pack for your flash, or a li-ion flash. I've started to shoot (or attempt to shoot) many more focus stacks lately, and that requires that my flash be able to keep up with the camera (now a K-3) shooting a longish burst of shots at Continuous High. There are basically two ways to achieve this: 1) adding an external power pack to your flash or 2) using a flash that has a li-ion internal battery. BTW, I believe that the latest Pentax flashes no longer have plugs for external power packs. But that doesn't matter to me since I am using (cheaper) manual off-brand flashes anyway. These days I usually shoot with a Godox V850ii flash which has an internal li-ion battery, or, when I'm feeling ambitious, a Godox AD180 with PB-960 external power pack. The AD180 is quite a bit more powerful than the V850ii, but it requires the use of the external pack, and I just find the external pack a little on the heavy side in my backpack...


Honorable mentions go to a hat, a water bottle, spare camera batteries, and a backpack! (On that last front, I'm currently using a Lowepro BP250 AWII and it works really well, with two mesh pockets on the sides - water bottle & flash - and a large non-camera space that is very useful.)
11-10-2017, 04:04 PM   #54
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Missed the party on the last round, so I guess I can join now? Goody

Lots of accessories to choose from, but my three most important:
1. Padded insert for my backpack (something like this, although I have no experience with this exact model.)
2. Rocket blower - obviously
3. Flight tickets to Africa, the thing that brought me back to "serious" shooting. Easily the most expensive accessory, and each ticket only works once
11-11-2017, 10:59 AM   #55
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QuoteOriginally posted by Doundounba Quote
Very late to the party, so I'll try to go for less mentioned things - not bags, not filters, not tripods, nor triggers... My main type of shooting is in-situ flash macro, so that perhaps orients my vision.

1) Knee pads. You can buy this, usually, where gardening supplies and tools are sold. Super useful to kneel down in many places that would otherwise chafe your knees! Kneeling down allows me to have a much more stable platform from which to shoot, and to get more "level" shots of bugs, rather than always looking down at them. (Sometimes I'll lie down too, but not all surfaces are amenable to this.)
A variant of this from the garden centre is an off-cut of pond liner. They throw them away. Cut to size for a kneeling pad they are thick, butyl rubber, which absorbs stones and rolls up small enough to stuff in a side ruck sack pocket. I also use a smaller cut piece, which I roll up inside the knelling pad, as a lens changing mat.
11-11-2017, 06:42 PM   #56
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Three accessories I find valuable.

My (#1) Rogue Flashbender...enhances flash photographs.....my (#2) Domke F-2 Original bag (have 2 actually)...best designed bag I've found after almost 50 years...my (#3) old Leitz Tiltall tripod.

My list is not in order of importance and I got a number of other accessories I like, but these are probably the top three.
11-12-2017, 09:30 AM   #57
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QuoteOriginally posted by BarryE Quote
Three most useful accessories?
1) A good timepiece, to keep me right for getting to jobs in a timely manner.
2) Smartphone to remind me of the small details, like clients names and when/where.
3) Lastly and probably the most important one... a Harem Manager to keep all my "Ladies" in check.
11-12-2017, 05:10 PM   #58
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Isn't it great how every one has different priorities. For me a LCD liveview viewfinder is easily at first place. Secondly after-market lens hoods are permanently attached to my legacy glass - the types that have a 58mm thread on the outer end so a lenscap can be in place without removing the lens hood.
11-28-2017, 08:56 AM - 2 Likes   #59
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After some thought:

1 cash

2 a good price

3 agreement of the spouse to buy

01-04-2018, 03:44 PM   #60
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It's a cold, cold day in Houston, and I have been reading through some threads on the forum. While reading this one I thought of a few things that hold me in good stead from time to time.
  • A cheap yoga mat for using when I am on my belly with my groundpod
  • A gardener's kneeling pad - thinking about it, knee pads might be better (hmm, maybe a trip to Harbor Freight might be in order)
  • A cheap "umbrella" folding chair to encourage my own patience when waiting for birds
These things stay in the back of my Yukon so they are available when I need them.
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