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03-17-2018, 10:34 AM   #1
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The difference in brands of polarizing filters?

I've got several CPL filters of different brands. Without a doubt, the Hoya brand is heads and shoulders above all the rest. At least that was the results of my "unscientific" test that basically consisted of looking through them and slowly turning them. Some didn't seem to make a whit of difference in reducing the glare, but Hoya? WOW! What a difference! My 72mm Hoya CPL was astounding at how much glare it reduced!


Maybe that's why they cost considerably more, eh? Second best was a Kodak CPL. The others? Meh.

03-17-2018, 10:46 AM   #2
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All of my UV and ND filters are Hoya. They are excellent.
03-17-2018, 11:42 AM - 1 Like   #3
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You cannot make assessments on brand alone. Hoya makes excellent filters and they make junk. As do most brands. They make filters for discount shops to sell for $20 and they make filters that sell for over $200. You have to specify which line of filter within the brand.
03-17-2018, 01:06 PM - 3 Likes   #4
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If you want to pay slightly more for slightly better, Hoya is a good choice, especially the newer ones with what is basically Pentax coatings and newer high transmission polarizing foils.

If you want full-on pro quality and price is irrelevant: plano-perfect flatness to each of the 4 glass surfaces; color-accurate polarizing foils; sealed edges...then you want Kaeseman version circular polarizers. I've only owned B+W and Heliopan brand Kaeseman polarizers and those brands using German optical glass are for real and worth the cost.

BTW, the color shift is most noticeable when shooting snow or other neutral images. The "bad" polarizers will have a slightly greenish or cyanish tint to them. Might be correctable in post, but definitely correctible in camera with hot shot polarizers (and manual white balance).

Note that polarizers are one of the most important filters due to the fact that their effect on glare, reflections and sky dust (is that refraction?) can't be corrected or duplicated with computer software, no matter how powerful.

Have fun with the Hoya and test it on white paper or something with the sun at 90 degrees to either side. Technically, your white balance setting will muddy the results by mixing camera colors with polarizer colors. But if the color shift is not a problem for you, shoot away and enjoy! Guessing it will be fine!

03-17-2018, 01:45 PM   #5
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Ron, very informative post on the Polarizers, thanks!
03-17-2018, 02:19 PM   #6
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I am also a fan of the higher end HOYA filters. The HD polarizers really do have better transmission and alter colors very little. I agree that HOYA puts its label on everything from junk filters to some of the better filters out there. Certainly for hobbyists, the HD is "good enough".
03-17-2018, 03:23 PM   #7
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This is more of a comparison of different models of polarizers, but still relevant:
Polarizing filters test 2015 - Introduction - LensTip.com

It's a comparison of about two dozen different circular polarizers in categories such as extinction (in all parts of the visible spectrum), flares, vignetting, etc.

03-17-2018, 03:27 PM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dewman Quote
Forse per questo che costano molto
A cheaper solution could be this, buy a good CPL filter with the maximum size of your lens, then buy a series of adapter rings or step-up or step-down, in italian ''anelli adattatori'' and so you have the ideal solution. Vignetting is not possible, and you'll save much more money. I repeat you is just one of many solutions, for example I was wrong buying all the filters with all the different diameters.
03-17-2018, 04:45 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Scintilla Quote
This is more of a comparison of different models of polarizers, but still relevant:
Polarizing filters test 2015 - Introduction - LensTip.com

It's a comparison of about two dozen different circular polarizers in categories such as extinction (in all parts of the visible spectrum), flares, vignetting, etc.

Fun comparisons! I just eat up studies like this. Thanks for the link. Great proof that newer polarizing foils really do transmit better and more accurately. The science proves it.

Of course, even a great study like this didn't test things like distortion or flatness of glass surfaces and whether that truly affects images. Didn't look at how the rings will hold up to a decade of use around salt air or if they tend to get stuck easily--polarizers get more on/off duty than most other filters. Does edge sealing on Kaeseman versions actually reduce risk of fogging, or does fogging ever actually happen to non-edge-sealed filters? There are lots of different criteria to compare filters.

Buy the good ones and they'll serve you well!
03-17-2018, 08:30 PM - 1 Like   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by maw Quote
A cheaper solution could be this, buy a good CPL filter with the maximum size of your lens, then buy a series of adapter rings or step-up or step-down, in italian ''anelli adattatori'' and so you have the ideal solution. Vignetting is not possible, and you'll save much more money. I repeat you is just one of many solutions, for example I was wrong buying all the filters with all the different diameters.
I wouldn't call this the ideal solution, since in many cases using a step-up ring with a large polarizer will prevent use of the lens shade (hood). I would rather be without the CPL than without the lens shade. YMMV
03-17-2018, 09:55 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by lsimpkins Quote
I wouldn't call this the ideal solution .....

I just suggested, it could be an alternative solution, for the hoods it is easy to find them cheap on eBay in China or ..., I have all shapes and diameters, I do not see where the problem is.
The other solution suggested by those called "professionals" and the use of square filters to be inserted in filter holders, such as Lee filters. But how much do they cost?
I know many purists of photography especially Canon/Nikon who without those filters say that the day is not suitable for the color temperature of the same, excuses and nonsense, do you not think?
03-18-2018, 03:08 AM   #12
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I always liked the old style Nikon polarizer filters as the top edge was broader than the base filter ring. The current Nikon pol filters no longer use this design and are the same size at both ends.

Assuming you are using the right size filter it effectively elimates any possibility of vignetting even when stacked on a UV filter. Being Nikon, the optical quality is really good too. Very color neutral. Some pol filters seem to leave a slight color cast.

However, I agree with Dewman that Hoya polarizer filters are really good and they are what I use now. The upper range ones easily match Nikon for quality and there have been rumors that Nikon filters are in fact made by Hoya.
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03-18-2018, 04:30 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dewman Quote
I've got several CPL filters of different brands. Without a doubt, the Hoya brand is heads and shoulders above all the rest. At least that was the results of my "unscientific" test that basically consisted of looking through them and slowly turning them. Some didn't seem to make a whit of difference in reducing the glare, but Hoya? WOW! What a difference! My 72mm Hoya CPL was astounding at how much glare it reduced!


Maybe that's why they cost considerably more, eh? Second best was a Kodak CPL. The others? Meh.
As a matter of interest (and because I've fallen into this trap myself ), can I just check you were looking through the back of all the filters, i.e. from the lens thread side? With CPL filters it makes a difference, which it didn't with the old-school linear polarisers that we can no longer use.

Cheers

Jonathan
03-18-2018, 06:42 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by maw Quote
I just suggested, it could be an alternative solution, for the hoods it is easy to find them cheap on eBay in China or ..., I have all shapes and diameters, I do not see where the problem is.
The other solution suggested by those called "professionals" and the use of square filters to be inserted in filter holders, such as Lee filters. But how much do they cost?
I know many purists of photography especially Canon/Nikon who without those filters say that the day is not suitable for the color temperature of the same, excuses and nonsense, do you not think?
I prefer the bayonet mount hoods engineered for the specific lens. I have no issue with those who take another tack, but I did have issue with the phrase "ideal solution"; cost effective, yes, but ideal I think not. I am fortunate to have an excellent Hoya CPL in each of my lens' filter sizes and some fit more than one of my lenses.
03-18-2018, 07:39 AM - 1 Like   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by h4yn0nnym0u5e Quote
.... With CPL filters it makes a difference, which it didn't with the old-school linear polarisers that we can no longer use.
There is no reason to not use linear polarizers. I don't know where or why the myth was started about circular polarizers being necessary to prevent issues with focusing and/or metering. Perhaps it had limited truth a decade+ ago, but it is just not the case with current cameras. At least I have yet to see any influence, and have yet to hear of anyone who has been able to provide actual first hand experience of such affects.
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