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05-02-2018, 03:00 AM   #1
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Backpack - photo and trekking hybrid?

Hi guys,


I'd ask you for your tips and hints concerning 2018 backpacks for trekking with separated photographic equipment area.


The goal is to put inside my K-1 with FA*28-70, FA* 80-200 (or DA*300 with TC) and possibly 1-2 additional small size lenses (like the FA ltd.).


I'm searching for a backpack I could take with me for 1-2 day long trip into the hills or when riding on bicycle.


Thanks in advance for your references

05-02-2018, 05:01 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by zzeitg Quote
Hi guys,


I'd ask you for your tips and hints concerning 2018 backpacks for trekking with separated photographic equipment area.


The goal is to put inside my K-1 with FA*28-70, FA* 80-200 (or DA*300 with TC) and possibly 1-2 additional small size lenses (like the FA ltd.).


I'm searching for a backpack I could take with me for 1-2 day long trip into the hills or when riding on bicycle.


Thanks in advance for your references
I really like swing style backpacks whereby you don't have to take the whole bag off to unzip and take the camera out, but I don't think my lowepro sports sling AW100 would work for you, it's too small. My only valuable comment I would give is to think about what kind of trekker/shooter you are. For me I do bushwalks and spend a lot of times shooting. I usually walk to the point of interest with the camera in hand the whole time, in case I see wildlife or something, I do more snapping than walking sometimes... the cameras never in the bag! But once I get my shots and its time to get back to the car I pretty much zip the camera up and get going.
So perhaps paying attention to how you work might factor in, are you gonna anchor the camera on the exterior of yer person for most of the time etc. That might mean a light backpack, even the weight (camera on front of person, perhaps a strap etc), even smaller bag as well. But... you can pack everything away if need be (bad weather etc).
05-02-2018, 05:39 AM   #3
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Naneu has a trekking backpack which also has a camera compartment. Photo - camera bags and cases, rolling dslr bags, adventure dslr backpack I just don't think they will be great for cycling.
Otherwise you could look at the range of fstop gear f-stop || Modular Camera Backpacks and Accessories
05-02-2018, 05:39 AM   #4
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Naneu has a trekking backpack which also has a camera compartment. Photo - camera bags and cases, rolling dslr bags, adventure dslr backpack I just don't think they will be great for cycling.
Otherwise you could look at the range of fstop gear f-stop || Modular Camera Backpacks and Accessories

05-02-2018, 05:53 AM   #5
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will one style fit both jobs?


I always pick my back packs ( even though mine are really luggage to and from the car and I don't do long hikes any more ) for the features that would make them suitable for long hikes

good waist band

good sternum straps

load lifters

good shoulder straps

and then protection for what I am carrying, inside the pack already or protection I can put in

ease of access

I don't cycle so I don't know if a back pack good for hiking would be good for cycling or not

here is info from the web that might be of help

Best Commuter Backpacks for Cyclists - Carryology - Exploring better ways to carry

How to Choose a Backpack: Sizing & Fit Guide - REI Expert Advice
05-02-2018, 06:45 AM - 1 Like   #6
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You may find this thread over at DPI of interest.

Biking and MF photography

Regards, Ray
05-02-2018, 09:45 AM - 2 Likes   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by zzeitg Quote
...1-2 day long trip into the hills or when riding on bicycle...
I think you'll need two different solutions. A good backpack large enough for 2 day trips will be too bulky to comfortably wear on a bike. Consider panniers if you want 2 day bicycle trips. Yes, different solutions get more expensive but hiking posture and biking posture are not the same.

Panniers put the weight on your bicycle instead of on your back. Weight on your back decreases stability and stresses your back while bent over cycling. A 2 day hiking bag with good back support inhibits cycling posture.

Some panniers are also wearable as backpacks. Search around and maybe you'll be able to find a convertible large enough for a 2-day trip.

For short bike trips, consider leaving the large lenses at home and you can use a sling bag. I have a Lowepro Slingshot that's held up well. Expect a sweaty bike when pedaling hard.
05-02-2018, 09:57 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by DeadJohn Quote
I think you'll need two different solutions. A good backpack large enough for 2 day trips will be too bulky to comfortably wear on a bike. Consider panniers if you want 2 day bicycle trips. Yes, different solutions get more expensive but hiking posture and biking posture are not the same.

Panniers put the weight on your bicycle instead of on your back. Weight on your back decreases stability and stresses your back while bent over cycling. A 2 day hiking bag with good back support inhibits cycling posture.

Some panniers are also wearable as backpacks. Search around and maybe you'll be able to find a convertible large enough for a 2-day trip.

For short bike trips, consider leaving the large lenses at home and you can use a sling bag. I have a Lowepro Slingshot that's held up well. Expect a sweaty bike when pedaling hard.
on a bicycle don't you want to keep the " center of gravity " as low as possible ?

as suggested not using a back pack would help with that

plus it prevents the shifting of the " load " as you go along

05-02-2018, 12:33 PM - 1 Like   #9
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Recently I purchased two bags. Features I was looking were 'side access', 'tripod hooking', 'under 3lbs'.

CaseLogic SLRC-206 (65$)
+Can take 15.6" Zbook
+Tripod holder design uses two straps and they are on the side. This design is usable.
+Base of the bag has rubber shell. So bag can be kept on wet surface.
+under 3lbs
-Too much padding
-Expensive
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002DW99H8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?t...&ie=UTF8&psc=1


USA Gear (49$)
Almost same as CaseLogic with one advantage and two disadvantages.
+Has side opening(caseLogic has front opening)
-Tripod holder design uses one strap and a pouch. This is not workable because pouch is too small, not suited for big tripod.
-Laptop compartment does not take 15.6" laptop

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005J09OXU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s01?t...&ie=UTF8&psc=1

These can carry laptop, K1, Tamron 28-75mm, Sigma 180mm Macro, Pentax 20-35mm f4 and Penrax DFA 150-450mm

Last edited by pentaxfall; 05-02-2018 at 12:39 PM.
05-02-2018, 05:01 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by DeadJohn Quote
I think you'll need two different solutions. A good backpack large enough for 2 day trips will be too bulky to comfortably wear on a bike. Consider panniers if you want 2 day bicycle trips. Yes, different solutions get more expensive but hiking posture and biking posture are not the same.

Panniers put the weight on your bicycle instead of on your back. Weight on your back decreases stability and stresses your back while bent over cycling. A 2 day hiking bag with good back support inhibits cycling posture.

Some panniers are also wearable as backpacks. Search around and maybe you'll be able to find a convertible large enough for a 2-day trip.

For short bike trips, consider leaving the large lenses at home and you can use a sling bag. I have a Lowepro Slingshot that's held up well. Expect a sweaty bike when pedaling hard.
Putting camera gear in panniers tho, is this a good idea? From my experience the panniers and bike suffer a heck of a lot more vibrations and shaking than the rider themselves. Our quads/legs are the suspension, therefore anything on yer person is generally going to have a gentler ride and experience.
05-02-2018, 09:19 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by BruceBanner Quote
Putting camera gear in panniers tho, is this a good idea? From my experience the panniers and bike suffer a heck of a lot more vibrations and shaking than the rider themselves. Our quads/legs are the suspension, therefore anything on yer person is generally going to have a gentler ride and experience.
Yes, more vibration risk in panniers. Use padding to absorb the vibration, and pack the free space with enough padding so nothing can bounce around.

Biking 2 days with a heavy backpack gives just a sweaty back if you are lucky. If you are unlucky (and the more often you do it the more you'll be unlucky), you get long-term back and seat pain from the extra weight, and increased risk of crashes from the higher center of gravity. If I read the OP correctly, they'll need a backpack big enough for 2 days of supplies plus K-1 and lenses; too much for bicycling.

There's a reason smaller cameras, like micro four-thirds and a kit lens, are made. That can go into a tiny backpack without adding too much weight. Carry food, water, etc. on the bike with just the camera on your back.

Last edited by DeadJohn; 05-02-2018 at 09:27 PM.
05-03-2018, 01:18 AM   #12
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It's long discontinued but I use a Lowepro Primus Minimus AW, if you can find something similar then I'd highly recommend it. A good photo trekking backpack is fantastic - I have that one and a more "normal" Kata photo backpack and the same gear loaded in the Lowepro seems to weigh less.
05-03-2018, 02:57 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by DeadJohn Quote
Yes, more vibration risk in panniers. Use padding to absorb the vibration, and pack the free space with enough padding so nothing can bounce around.

Biking 2 days with a heavy backpack gives just a sweaty back if you are lucky. If you are unlucky (and the more often you do it the more you'll be unlucky), you get long-term back and seat pain from the extra weight, and increased risk of crashes from the higher center of gravity. If I read the OP correctly, they'll need a backpack big enough for 2 days of supplies plus K-1 and lenses; too much for bicycling.

There's a reason smaller cameras, like micro four-thirds and a kit lens, are made. That can go into a tiny backpack without adding too much weight. Carry food, water, etc. on the bike with just the camera on your back.
If it was me in that situ I would prefer to have a smaller backpack then (with only important camera gear, try not to exceed 3 or so kilos in weight, but invest in more panniers (front and rear) to accommodate everything else. I agree not wanting to have a massive and heavy backpack on yer person when on a bike, but even padding panniers so nothing can move about doesn't stop rattling or vibrations to the lenses and equipment themselves.
05-03-2018, 03:25 AM   #14
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Pinholecam's done multiday tours with panniers on a little folding bike, IIRC. He takes a K-1, FA77, FA31, tripod and an UWA like the M20 f4 or Samyang 14mm.
05-03-2018, 03:35 AM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
Pinholecam's done multiday tours with panniers on a little folding bike, IIRC. He takes a K-1, FA77, FA31, tripod and an UWA like the M20 f4 or Samyang 14mm.
Clearly the solution is to mount that camera on the handlebars for super quick access
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