Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
09-07-2020, 07:34 PM - 5 Likes   #31
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Arkansas, USA
Posts: 1,147
My suggestion would be to just go out and take pictures and learn your new camera first. Take the manual with you. Once you learn how your camera works in the different modes and which mode you need to use to get the kind of photo you want, you will see pretty quickly what accessories you might want. The only accessories I would suggest right now are a decent camera bag of some kind and some sort of lens cleaning kit. The bag doesn't have to be expensive, just provide protection. I use a 30 year old video camcorder bag purchased at a thrift shop.

As time goes by, you will find there is an endless number of accessories available. Do your research to make sure they fill a need or solve a problem you have before purchasing any, then purchase the best quality you can afford.

09-08-2020, 03:43 AM - 1 Like   #32
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: SW Bavaria
Posts: 295
QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
To add to your list that I would consider basic:

a) Spare battery. That way you always have a spare wherever you are when the first one dies.
b) Spare memory card. Less essential but again, it gives you confidence that you can keep shooting without having to delete images on the streets.
c) A blower brush and microfiber cloth or Lens pen for cleaning your lens well and with care.
d) Photo editing software. If you can afford it, a subscription to Adobe Lightroom. There are less expensive alternatives, but anything so you can shoot RAW instead of jpegs.
e) An external hard drive or flash drive if you don't have the space or the cloud to store your images.
I second this as the most essential items (with the exception of a RAW software from the start) and would only add a good cardreader and the already mentioned bag.

All other items are depending on what you shoot and how.
09-08-2020, 04:49 AM   #33
Unregistered User
Guest




Asking about accessories is a bit like Alice's trip down the rabbit-hole. Ok, there are some things everybody needs: a way to carry your stuff around, a tripod, a spare battery. Beyond that, and I figure you need a minimum basic kit of stuff that supports the kind of photography you plan to be doing. Need a neck strap, a wrist strap, a chest harness, a hip-holster? Depends. How about filters, UV, gradient and normal neutral density filters, polarizing filters? Depends. The list goes on and on, people are out there making all kinds of photographic accessories. A good example of the range of the kinds of stuff available can be viewed at the Promaster website: Index (a joint venture co-operative sort of thing owned and operated by camera store owners).

My strong suggestion is that you start with a bare bones approach and save your pennies for when you figure out what you really need to do the kind of photography you like to do. And that's a thing you have to learn over time by watching yourself and making inferences like, "Gee, I seem to be spending a lot of time looking for birds to photograph", then perhaps you're a wildlife kind of person; or if you go out at 4 am to look at the stars every day, then maybe astrophotography's the thing for you. There are different kinds of "props" you'll need depending on what it is you want to do. Wait until you figure out what it is you want to do with the camera, which you can do simply by taking pictures and noting what kinds of pictures you find satisfying.
09-08-2020, 08:11 AM - 1 Like   #34
csa
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
csa's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Montana mountains
Posts: 9,942
QuoteOriginally posted by Papa_Joe Quote
) Photo editing software. If you can afford it, a subscription to Adobe Lightroom. There are less expensive alternatives, but anything so you can shoot RAW instead of jpegs.
I've never shot RAW, rather jpegs; and am most happy with the results, including enlargements! I use FastStone imaging; and it works very well for me; and it's Free!

09-08-2020, 09:02 AM - 2 Likes   #35
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
gump's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Canton, Ohio
Posts: 665
QuoteOriginally posted by csa Quote
I've never shot RAW, rather jpegs; and am most happy with the results, including enlargements! I use FastStone imaging; and it works very well for me; and it's Free!
Free is good, my preferred price, however, you might take a look at other programs via "free trials." I went with Affinity Photo this way and rejected Luminar. An editing program can be as personal as your camera kit.
09-08-2020, 09:29 AM - 1 Like   #36
csa
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
csa's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Montana mountains
Posts: 9,942
QuoteOriginally posted by gump Quote
Free is good, my preferred price, however, you might take a look at other programs via "free trials." I went with Affinity Photo this way and rejected Luminar. An editing program can be as personal as your camera kit.
I've purchased many editing programs, including Luminar, which I currently also have. My preferred "quick" editing is still FastStone.

I've been in photography for over 60 years, and always like to try the latest & greatest things that benefit my photography; but in the end, the price does not always mean better. What works for me, does not mean it's for everyone, and vice versa.

Last edited by csa; 09-08-2020 at 09:35 AM.
09-08-2020, 09:56 AM - 3 Likes   #37
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
jatrax's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: Washington Cascades
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,991
QuoteOriginally posted by csa Quote
the price does not always mean better. What works for me, does not mean it's for everyone, and vice versa.
The cost often forgotten is the time spent thoroughly learning a program. I often see people jumping to which ever is the newest darling program and wonder at how smart they must be to learn something new so quickly. I have used Lightroom almost daily for 10 years and still do not feel I have mastered it. For me to jump to a new program and learn it would have a time cost that I simply am not willing to pay. I know I am a slow learner (my wife tells me so) but I cannot see myself learning a new program in less than a year of constant use.

09-08-2020, 10:02 AM - 1 Like   #38
csa
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
csa's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Montana mountains
Posts: 9,942
QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
The cost often forgotten is the time spent thoroughly learning a program. I often see people jumping to which ever is the newest darling program and wonder at how smart they must be to learn something new so quickly. I have used Lightroom almost daily for 10 years and still do not feel I have mastered it. For me to jump to a new program and learn it would have a time cost that I simply am not willing to pay. I know I am a slow learner (my wife tells me so) but I cannot see myself learning a new program in less than a year of constant use.
I don't feel a person ever learns everything about a program. But thru the years, using different programs; I have learned which work best for me, and that I feel the most comfortable with. It does take time to use them to get to a stage where you can decide if it's one you wish to continue with or not. Luminar, which I've had for 2-3?years, is an easy to use program. It's a great program, and many, many features for one to accomplish to use. It's also interesting enough that I have kept it!
09-08-2020, 10:11 AM - 1 Like   #39
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
jatrax's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: Washington Cascades
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,991
QuoteOriginally posted by csa Quote
Luminar, which I've had for 2-3?years, is an easy to use program. It's a great program, and many, many features for one to accomplish to use. It's also interesting enough that I have kept it!
Luminar is on my list of things I should try. I just don't want to invest the time I would need to learn it.
I've already decided that I need to move away from Lightroom because of the ongoing cost but I am waiting until a clear consensus for a replacement is available. My Lightroom time is primarily for business so time learning something new is time not completing work. Maybe when I retire I will have more time
09-08-2020, 10:28 AM - 1 Like   #40
csa
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
csa's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Montana mountains
Posts: 9,942
Luminar is a very easy program to learn. Right from the start, one can use it with great results. There are many features that yes, will require time to learn; but they can be done as time allows.
09-08-2020, 11:18 AM - 1 Like   #41
Pentaxian
bdery's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Quebec city, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8,656
My suggestions:

1-A good carrying bag. There aree so many options, think about what you will carry, how you want to carry and use your stuff, etc. I have tested many many bags and can give pointers if you wish. I particularly like Think Tank and Peak Design, but there are other great products.

2-A decent strap. I use Peak Design's system, but rarely use a neck strap, I prefer my custom-made hand strap built from a strip of leather and Peak Design's Anchor links.

3-A tripod. Do not cheap on this, get something good or you will spend more money upgrading. Size, stability and price do not mix well, you can usually get any two. Travel tripods are not the same as studio tripod.

4-A flash. A good P-TTL flash with slave options is a good choice. I like Metz's 52 AF-1, not too expensive, quite easy to use and intuitive, powerful and reliable.

5-Lenses. decide which kind (s) of pictures you want to take, and you will be able to get guidance as to which lenses could be a good fit.
09-08-2020, 11:43 AM - 1 Like   #42
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Florida
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,241
QuoteOriginally posted by csa Quote
Luminar is a very easy program to learn. Right from the start, one can use it with great results. There are many features that yes, will require time to learn; but they can be done as time allows.
Yes it is. The biggest fault for a new user is it leads to a lot of over-processing just because they can. Not every sky needs to be replaced

Luminar is a relatively inexpensive photo editing program that covers all the basic needs and then some, and easily navigated. I would definitely recommend it as it has some very unique features even an Adobe guy might enjoy, and it's sure a lot easier to use.
09-08-2020, 12:39 PM   #43
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
jatrax's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Location: Washington Cascades
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 12,991
QuoteOriginally posted by gatorguy Quote
I would definitely recommend it as it has some very unique features
Have they implemented the DAM feature yet? I looked at it some time ago but without asset management its a non-starter for me. To be honest digital asset management is far more important than image processing. Lightroom already offers far more image tweaking options than I will ever use. But finding and delivering an image when someone wants it is critical to me.
09-08-2020, 01:57 PM   #44
Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Central Florida
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,241
QuoteOriginally posted by jatrax Quote
Have they implemented the DAM feature yet? I looked at it some time ago but without asset management its a non-starter for me. To be honest digital asset management is far more important than image processing. Lightroom already offers far more image tweaking options than I will ever use. But finding and delivering an image when someone wants it is critical to me.
I use it as a PS plug-in and do my catalog in LR, so I didn't know if DAM is now part of it.
09-08-2020, 02:00 PM - 1 Like   #45
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: California
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 35
More advice

The type of photography you say you usually do (street, architecture, landscape, outdoors) is what I prefer to do. I find that the lens I use most often is the 21mm ltd., which is very small, light and provides exceptional image quality. It is equivalent to a 32mm lens on full-frame (which is close to the normal 35mm view). It is still wide enough for great architecture and landscape shots but "normal" enough for street and closer shots. I suggest that, after using your zoom lens, go back and look at the EXIF information for your photos. See what specific focal length you used most often. That's how I realized so many of the photos I took with with a zoom lens tended to be in the 20 - 24mm APS-C focal range, and led me to pick the 21mm prime. I doubt that you would use a tripod very often for the types of photos you describe.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
21mm, faststone, flaws, landscape, lens, peak, pentax, photos, programs, shots, street, studio, travel, tripod
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PLEASE HELP this newbie!! Accessories needed for this Reception Hall MaGee5 Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 28 02-01-2020 11:33 AM
Newbie Armature, Newbie to Pentax jgirl57 Welcomes and Introductions 5 08-31-2014 09:31 AM
For Sale - Sold: FS/FT: Like New Samsung GX-1S DSLR Kit! + Accessories MC25 Sold Items 10 06-15-2009 01:00 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:29 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top