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10-31-2020, 11:16 PM - 2 Likes   #16
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I'm of the opinion that ND filters are really no longer necessary for landscape photography. (Graduated ND filters still have a place in my bag, however).

Check out the following article on how your Pentax camera may be able to use it's built in interval timer to automatically composite several shorter exposures into a single long exposure RAW file.
In-camera Composites Using Creative Shooting Modes - Articles and Tips | PentaxForums.com
I've been using this feature to good effect since purchasing my own K-1 in 2016 and have left my ND filters in the cabinet ever since.

Worth noting is that this 'in camera' method doesn't allow for shooting wide open apertures of f/1.4 or similar in full sunlight the way an ND filter would allow (by cutting out enough light to bring the shutter speed to 1/8000 or less). Similarly, this in camera method would not allow the photographer to keep shutter speeds at or below the 1/200s or 1/180s maximum sync speeds of most Pentax cameras when shooting at wide apertures in bright light outdoors with flash off camera (outside of p-ttl enabled wireless flash methods). However, neither of these two scenarios have proven to be an issue for me personally in the last 10 years of shooting and I am doubtful that they ever will.

Finally, I think it's worth pointing out that there are all sorts of photography websites that routinely create content marketed to amateurs and enthusiasts extolling the virtues of all sorts of equipment that "you've just got to buy!" Don't believe the hype.

Call me old fashioned, but I'm of the opinion that the best investment you can make in photography is, more often than not, in yourself. Before succumbing to GAS, make sure that the new equipment your are looking at purchasing will help you overcome the limits of the gear you already own, in a way that you have actually encountered before. I, for one, have certainly fallen down the rabbit hole of researching all sorts of camera gadgets and gizmos that I can buy, to the detriment of actually spending time out in the field taking photos, or reflecting on past successes and failures, or brushing up on colour theory, or learning composition technique, or a thousand and one other ways to improve my craft.

But, hey, that's just me. Best wishes and good luck with whatever you choose!


Last edited by Gerbermiester; 10-31-2020 at 11:36 PM.
10-31-2020, 11:42 PM   #17
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Thanks, everybody! Silly me, I hadnít realized that of course AF would not work or work well with a 10 stop ND filter.
11-01-2020, 02:17 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gerbermiester Quote
I'm of the opinion that ND filters are really no longer necessary for landscape photography. (Graduated ND filters still have a place in my bag, however).

Check out the following article on how your Pentax camera may be able to use it's built in interval timer to automatically composite several shorter exposures into a single long exposure RAW file.
In-camera Composites Using Creative Shooting Modes - Articles and Tips | PentaxForums.com
I've been using this feature to good effect since purchasing my own K-1 in 2016 and have left my ND filters in the cabinet ever since.

Worth noting is that this 'in camera' method doesn't allow for shooting wide open apertures of f/1.4 or similar in full sunlight the way an ND filter would allow (by cutting out enough light to bring the shutter speed to 1/8000 or less). Similarly, this in camera method would not allow the photographer to keep shutter speeds at or below the 1/200s or 1/180s maximum sync speeds of most Pentax cameras when shooting at wide apertures in bright light outdoors with flash off camera (outside of p-ttl enabled wireless flash methods). However, neither of these two scenarios have proven to be an issue for me personally in the last 10 years of shooting and I am doubtful that they ever will.

Finally, I think it's worth pointing out that there are all sorts of photography websites that routinely create content marketed to amateurs and enthusiasts extolling the virtues of all sorts of equipment that "you've just got to buy!" Don't believe the hype.

Call me old fashioned, but I'm of the opinion that the best investment you can make in photography is, more often than not, in yourself. Before succumbing to GAS, make sure that the new equipment your are looking at purchasing will help you overcome the limits of the gear you already own, in a way that you have actually encountered before. I, for one, have certainly fallen down the rabbit hole of researching all sorts of camera gadgets and gizmos that I can buy, to the detriment of actually spending time out in the field taking photos, or reflecting on past successes and failures, or brushing up on colour theory, or learning composition technique, or a thousand and one other ways to improve my craft.

But, hey, that's just me. Best wishes and good luck with whatever you choose!
Yes, you can simulate long exposure using multiple captures but the results are not exactly the same - it's like analog vs. digital: analog = stepless, digital = with steps you can vary in interval length and duration. If you are using long exposure to get a people crowded location empty the digital simulation may cause bigger problems. So what technique should use depends on you're goals for your image results and what kind of working process you like.

I use Haida M10 100mm ND / GND and screwing filters (Haida and Hoya) depending on situation. These are good filters but they are not cheap. Good multi-coated and "unbreakable" glass costs. At the moment I'm thinking about buying a variable ND filter for doing more controlled time-lapse.
11-01-2020, 07:36 AM - 1 Like   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gerbermiester Quote
I'm of the opinion that ND filters are really no longer necessary for landscape photography. (Graduated ND filters still have a place in my bag, however).
I actually think it's the other way around for me: In my opinion the usefullness for graduaded ND filters in digital is negligible because of the many possibilities you have in post when shooting RAW. Furthermore do I encounter rarely even enough horizons so nothing would stand into the darker parts of a graduaded ND filter.

As for the possibilities you have in digital to simulate ND filters you are right in many cases (landscape photography beeing usually one of those cases) but in other areas like when you wanna shoot a light trail of a car or some similar non continual movement you will miss ND filters very much. Also you use up a lot of actuations of the camera if you simulate a ND filter with your camera.

11-01-2020, 09:22 AM - 2 Likes   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by Raffwal Quote
I hadn’t realized that of course AF would not work or work well with a 10 stop ND filter
One of the reasons I like using a variable ND filter is being able to do all the focusing before darkening the filter to 10+ stops.

On a sunny day, or in other brightly lit scenes, an ND filter offers a lot of flexibility
11-01-2020, 03:06 PM - 1 Like   #21
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AF actually operates well for me when I use my ND filters. I use the 9 stop ND for landscape with my K-3 II/16-85 and I have no problem with the AF. I use center point AF area, and AF.C mode a majority of the time. When I use the 9 stop I am usually performing longer exposures on my tripod and I get excellent shots. With the less dense filters (6 and 3 stop) I do not have AF difficulty either.
11-02-2020, 08:35 AM - 1 Like   #22
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Live view is handy when using ND filters on a tripod. Also make sure the viewfinder is covered to prevent stray sunlight into the camera when doing longer exposures.i

I use the end of a black sock (small) to cover my viewfinder when shooting long exposures.


Last edited by C_Jones; 11-02-2020 at 07:25 PM.
11-03-2020, 09:01 AM - 1 Like   #23
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Ideally you want to bring your widest and largest filter size lens to do some test shots. Some variable ND filters don't play well with wide angles and create weird shaped X patterns due to cross polarization.
12-19-2020, 03:08 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Gerbermiester Quote
I'm of the opinion that ND filters are really no longer necessary for landscape photography. (Graduated ND filters still have a place in my bag, however).

Check out the following article on how your Pentax camera may be able to use it's built in interval timer to automatically composite several shorter exposures into a single long exposure RAW file.
In-camera Composites Using Creative Shooting Modes - Articles and Tips | PentaxForums.com
I've been using this feature to good effect since purchasing my own K-1 in 2016 and have left my ND filters in the cabinet ever since.

Worth noting is that this 'in camera' method doesn't allow for shooting wide open apertures of f/1.4 or similar in full sunlight the way an ND filter would allow (by cutting out enough light to bring the shutter speed to 1/8000 or less). Similarly, this in camera method would not allow the photographer to keep shutter speeds at or below the 1/200s or 1/180s maximum sync speeds of most Pentax cameras when shooting at wide apertures in bright light outdoors with flash off camera (outside of p-ttl enabled wireless flash methods). However, neither of these two scenarios have proven to be an issue for me personally in the last 10 years of shooting and I am doubtful that they ever will.

Finally, I think it's worth pointing out that there are all sorts of photography websites that routinely create content marketed to amateurs and enthusiasts extolling the virtues of all sorts of equipment that "you've just got to buy!" Don't believe the hype.

Call me old fashioned, but I'm of the opinion that the best investment you can make in photography is, more often than not, in yourself. Before succumbing to GAS, make sure that the new equipment your are looking at purchasing will help you overcome the limits of the gear you already own, in a way that you have actually encountered before. I, for one, have certainly fallen down the rabbit hole of researching all sorts of camera gadgets and gizmos that I can buy, to the detriment of actually spending time out in the field taking photos, or reflecting on past successes and failures, or brushing up on colour theory, or learning composition technique, or a thousand and one other ways to improve my craft.

But, hey, that's just me. Best wishes and good luck with whatever you choose!
"I'm of the opinion that ND filters are really no longer necessary for landscape photography. (Graduated ND filters still have a place in my bag, however)."

When I'm shooting landscapes I keep a polarizing filter on the lens. They work just as well as .6 ND filter(-2 stops). They come in handy when it is very bright outside and you want to use a wide aperture, or slow shutter speed, or both, but the camera only recommends high shutter speed/small aperture... This is especially the case with old Manual lenses
12-19-2020, 09:01 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by hjoseph7 Quote
"I'm of the opinion that ND filters are really no longer necessary for landscape photography. (Graduated ND filters still have a place in my bag, however)."

When I'm shooting landscapes I keep a polarizing filter on the lens. They work just as well as .6 ND filter(-2 stops). They come in handy when it is very bright outside and you want to use a wide aperture, or slow shutter speed, or both, but the camera only recommends high shutter speed/small aperture... This is especially the case with old Manual lenses
Ultra wide angle makes polarizer a a little iffy for a sub for nd filters since the sky doesnít always render with the same polarization across the frame.
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