Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-22-2021, 02:20 PM   #16
Otis Memorial Pentaxian
Loyal Site Supporter
stevebrot's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver (USA)
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 41,462
Carrying the camera on your person is a potential safety hazard. If drastic maneuvers are required the camera should not be on the list of distractions and in a fall the camera becomes a hammer to your ribs. I vote for padded or rigid case on either a front or back rack.

Steve

(...done a ton of cycling with camera, though never with anything that would not fit in the jersey/jacket pocket or in the rack trunk bag...)

03-22-2021, 03:12 PM   #17
Forum Member




Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 64
QuoteOriginally posted by JensE Quote
Not something like this is sold in the US, but Koenig produces nice bags based on Ortlieb shells: bikeBag4 - König Photobags
They add a hard inner shell, but key is that the insert is suspended, so it absorbs shocks very well.

I usually have more stuff to bring than just camera gear and just pack my camera into my Ortlieb back rollers in one of my camera shoulder bags, with an additional soft/elastic layer below. Depending on what I bring, this can be a layer of foam in case nothing fits. Spare clothes or laundry on multi-day tours. Larger lenses such as the DA300 come along in separate well-padded cases, because I don't have a fitting bag other than by backpacks. Putting the camera bag at the top gives quick access - I usually leave the zippers open and just use camera bag and pannier buckles to close. This has served me well for decades, the only concern is a secure stand for the bicycle. Both bags open, you don't want it to tip over.
I've been thinking of using an Ortlieb like pannier attached to a piece of round bar mounted on to my steer. The pannier hanging down in front of the steer, with an insert inside. (Instead of an insert you can use properly shaped foam) This way the pannier is more like a holster.
03-22-2021, 03:25 PM   #18
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
JensE's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Leipzig
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,320
QuoteOriginally posted by Haenzel Quote
I've been thinking of using an Ortlieb like pannier attached to a piece of round bar mounted on to my steer. The pannier hanging down in front of the steer, with an insert inside. (Instead of an insert you can use properly shaped foam) This way the pannier is more like a holster.
I'm not aware of any 1.5in (or whatever your diamete is) -> 10mm (+/- 2mm) clamps to attach it, but I'd trust some which I would build more than the usual Klickfix adaptors for standard front bags up to ~5kg. The smaller Front-Rollers (Front Bicycle Panniers | Ortlieb USA - Sport Roller in the USA) may be a good fit, depending on ow much you have going on in terms of cables, light ...
03-22-2021, 03:42 PM   #19
Forum Member




Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Derbyshire
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 91
Depending on your bike, a bag strapped to a pizza rack or something like the Carradice Super Slim with inserts or bag slid inside:
Carradice | Bicycle Seat Bag | Super C SQR Slim

03-22-2021, 04:01 PM   #20
Forum Member




Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 64
QuoteOriginally posted by JensE Quote
I'm not aware of any 1.5in (or whatever your diamete is) -> 10mm (+/- 2mm) clamps to attach it, but I'd trust some which I would build more than the usual Klickfix adaptors for standard front bags up to ~5kg. The smaller Front-Rollers (Front Bicycle Panniers | Ortlieb USA - Sport Roller in the USA) may be a good fit, depending on ow much you have going on in terms of cables, light ...
If you would replace the middle part with a threaded rod, I think this would work: 7/8'' 22mm Motorcycle Handlebar Cross Bar Steering Strength Lever Dirt Pit Bike | eBay
03-22-2021, 04:20 PM   #21
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
JensE's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Leipzig
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,320
QuoteOriginally posted by Haenzel Quote
If you would replace the middle part with a threaded rod, I think this would work: ...
Looks like a way to go, but it depends on you bike: 22mm (22.2mm) is a classic touring steering bar diameter, drop bars/bull horn bars usually have 24mm break clamp diameter.
03-22-2021, 05:14 PM   #22
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Lowell Goudge's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Toronto
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 16,917
QuoteOriginally posted by Bob 256 Quote
You might consider a hard case. A hard case can be strapped on the back of a bike, plus it offers protection from falls and the weather. Most are foam lined which makes the protection they offer from shocks and falls far greater than a soft case,
The vibration of a bike frame will kill a lens hard case or not. On the riders back is the only way

03-22-2021, 05:24 PM - 1 Like   #23
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
JensE's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Leipzig
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,320
QuoteOriginally posted by Lowell Goudge Quote
The vibration of a bike frame will kill a lens hard case or not. On the riders back is the only way
So my lenses are dead? I had several things killing lenses. With proper padding, bicycle vibration is definitely not one of them. I'm talking about several thousands of kilometers with AF lenses, and a lot more on MF film SLRs.
03-22-2021, 06:27 PM - 1 Like   #24
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: North
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,500
I do bikepacking and photography, but I don't carry a lens longer than a 135mm.

The type of bike will affect what type of carrying system you use.
Generally I am using a folding bike which has space in front for a front bag or I strap on my Lowepro Inverse 200AW to the handlebars (via DIY straps ).
There really isn't much on the market for DSLR style bike bags, with most options catered for smaller mirrorless cameras.

More recently, I've also been using a Carradice Pendel saddle bag either with the Bagman support or modified for handlebar mount.
Examples of what I've mentioned :
Camper Longflap - Green
Carradice | Bagman Quick Release Expedition Support


All options mentioned can carry the K1; Laowa 12/2.8 UWA, WA lens, normal, short tele, batteries, wipes, filters.


Also possible might be the longish type strap based saddle bags more popular with 'fast' ride types.
Bikepacking Seatpack - Black
(thought likely a pain to take in/out)


IMHO, do be mindful of big bumps on the camera system (if doing trails ).
As such, if I am to rate it I'd say a handlebar bag on a bike with front suspension fork is probably the best and the last option is a bag mounted on the rear rack of a rigid bike.
Something strapped on and hung will be better than resting on a hard surface since it will work more like a 'hammock' to have some give and then we add on the padding for even more cushioning.


Some examples of what I've used. (don't have the ones with the carradice bag on handlebar and saddle mounted though )





Ortlieb front bag





A rough idea of a large front mounted handlebar bag will be this ... (Fabio's Chest handlebar bag )
https://media.theradavist.com/uploads/2018/03/DSC_4057.jpeg?w=1400&quality=75
03-22-2021, 11:32 PM   #25
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
ramseybuckeye's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Hampstead, NC
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 14,571
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by pres589 Quote
Watching this thread to see what gets suggested. I would like to be able to ride a bicycle and easily get to a camera and shoot from the saddle.

There are the backpacks with side access openings. I've got one and I found it awkward and just weird to use. Probably doing it wrong; I imagine with the right padded insert it would probably work but it wouldn't be very fast to get to. A sling bag sounds nice in theory but I think it would migrate all around me while riding?

EDIT: What about this? l think this might work pretty well? Digital Holster Harness - DSLR camera support strap stabilizer system ? Think Tank Photo
That's the holster I mentioned in post 8, the most likely solution at this point.

QuoteOriginally posted by bertwert Quote
Another idea is a combo of sling strap and and elastic waistband of sorts to hold it in place while you're cycling. That's what I've done when ski touring (though with smaller lenses here, with the A 400 was only on flat ground and XC skiing).

If you're on a road style bike I'd avoid putting anything on your back, I find it kills my back even with a fairly light weight.
On a mountain bike with a more upright sitting position, it's not so bad and I regularly use a small backpack there.
I really didn't think about the weight and your position as much as stability and heat on your back, good point.

QuoteOriginally posted by moggi1964 Quote
I'm thinking support van. Then you just call out for the camera/lens setup you need. Easy
Best idea yet, only two problems with it 1) I can hear my wife laughing now 2) my main place I will shuts down motorized vehicles in Spring and Summer. Which is great for biking and hiking

QuoteOriginally posted by Snapppy Quote
I was just writing up a response and saw this

I ride with a camera almost everyday, mostly on dirt trails like Sidney Porter mentioned. I've found different things that work with different camera setups. With a smaller camera, I found I can't beat peak designs capture clip for quick access. No opening a bag or anything, just stop (or slow down ) the bike and take a picture. For slightly larger setups a sling bag or camera backpack with side access works great for fast access. Both of these work fine for road or well packed dirt. If you're planning on mountain biking sort of stuff (not sure if you are) then a proper biking backpack with an insert works great. I use an osprey raptor 14. It hugs my body and eliminates almost all bouncing even on very bumpy terrain.

With my DA* 300mm specifically I have tried two bags. The think tank digital holster 30 (mentioned above) and the lowepro top loader pro 75 AW II. Both can be worn as a sling or as a chest mount. The think tank is much slimmer for approximately the same inner dimensions, so it works better as an insert for a biking backpack. The lowepro toploader is larger so it's a tighter fit, but has way more features as a standalone bag.

I have not tried it, but I believe chest mounting either of those two (or something similar) would work just fine biking on non rough surfaces. That would allow that faster access you desire. I know this method is popular with skiers I've watched on documentaries.

Through all the variations I've tried I've found it really is a game of quick access vs most stable/non-moving. For the rougher places I go I found I just had to give up the fast access and go with a biking specific backpack for stability and little more crash proof. But for cycling around town or light trails then just about any method you like while hiking works fine biking.

I'm interested in what other people use as well.

Hope that was at least moderately helpful. If either of those two bags for the 300mm look useful to you I can provide pics with my camera and lens in them or anything else you're curious about.

Thanks.
Thanks very much for sharing your experiences, it helps when someone has actually used something. I think the Capture Clip would be excellent the the lens was shorter. I think I will be happy with the Dig Holster 30 and harness, I'm glad you mentioned the 30 because I hadn't looked close enough to realize is is longer than the 40, I was thinking I may have to go to the 50, but the 30 will fit much better and not sloppy. I've seen these in a couple of camera stores before and have considered it for hiking when I wanted to take two cameras and not have them both on sling straps. Thanks!

Thanks everyone for all of the suggestions and comments!
03-23-2021, 12:10 AM   #26
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: North
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 4,500
I will dissuade you from the holster and any type of on-person carrier system.
I've done that sometimes on my trips to save on time getting the bag on/off bike and the added weight adds to bump soreness.

YMMV of course.
03-23-2021, 12:10 AM   #27
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hoek van Holland
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,345
If you are able to find one second hand, the Clik elite Bodylink will do the job very well. I have one and use it when quickly go to the beach to shoot surf.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/675846-REG/Clik_Elite_CE512GR_BodyLin...981&
but as Clik is out of buisnes you need to find it secondhand
03-23-2021, 01:23 AM   #28
Moderator
Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
MarkJerling's Avatar

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Wairarapa, New Zealand
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 16,946
QuoteOriginally posted by ramseybuckeye Quote
I hope to start bicycling in a nearby place where I like to shoot birds and wildlife. I want to go as light as possible while carrying a KP, DA#300 and DA 1.4 converter. I would prefer not to have to carry it on my back in a pack, although I know that may be the only way. That's probably too big a combo for a chest mount, from reviews that I have read, but maybe I've read the wrong reviews for the wrong products. I bike mount bag could be nice to if there are any big enough and safe enough. Obviously something to take the shock of road bumps and such would be needed. Thanks for any ideas.
As an avid road cyclist, I would recommend a good backpack. I have a Fancier King Kong 40 which works well, but could do with more padding on the sides. See https://www.phototools.co.nz/fancier-professional-quality-backpack-bag-for-c...your-gear-1733

Something like this will work nicely: amazon.com : Tenba Axis Backpack Bags (637-701), 20L : Camera & Photo?tag=pentaxforums-20&
03-23-2021, 08:07 AM   #29
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,329
Depending on what kind of bike you ride, this might work for you. I have a front basket, which is large enough to accommodate a small padded camera bag with K 1 and a couple of supplementary lenses. It is held in place with a net, available at many cycling shops. Reasonably quick access is possible. If the long lens doesn't quite fit on the camera when it's in the basket, it goes in pannier bag attached to the rear rack. As long as the lens itself is in a protective cover, perhaps also under a sweater or jacket to keep it from shifting, the pannier provides adequate protection--it's suspended from the frame, which provides a bit of isolation. This arrangement doesn't give you quick access to the long lens, of course, but works if you're going to someplace with a view to shooting there.
03-24-2021, 03:32 AM - 2 Likes   #30
Seeker of Knowledge
Loyal Site Supporter
aslyfox's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Topeka, Kansas
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 23,003
QuoteOriginally posted by moggi1964 Quote
I'm thinking support van. Then you just call out for the camera/lens setup you need. Easy
how about one of those two seater bikes ?

the person in the front pedals and you sit in the back holding the camera ?
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
bicycling, reviews, tripod
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bicycling with camera Wired Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 26 05-12-2013 08:36 AM
Good bag for bicycling v5planet Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 14 05-26-2011 04:28 PM
Attention Bicycling Photographers!... Tamia Photographic Technique 25 11-17-2010 06:52 AM
Contest Attention Bicycling Photogs... Tamia Mini-Challenges, Games, and Photo Stories 4 10-18-2010 10:47 AM
Shooting pro bicycling road race stages barondla Photographic Technique 18 10-04-2008 05:58 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:04 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top