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05-07-2009, 06:35 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
Very timely thread for me:

I just bought a bike Saturday after years and years.

And my ass STILL hurts today on Wednesday!
The trick is, don't rest!

I got back on my bike yesterday after the winter break. This morning was pretty painful... for about 5 minutes. Then I guess the pain receptors just got tired, and gave up! It's the same story every year - the first ride is great, the second is awful for 5 minutes, the third for 3 minutes, and by the 4th ride I'm fine.

As for carrying a DSLR on a bike, I can't imagine carrying it anywhere with "easy access". I carry it in my backpack, where I act as shock-absorber. If I want to take a picture, I have to dig it out. But it's pretty quick - I have a small lowepro tlz, that I stick in the top of my pack, usually with the top unzipped (the lowepro, that is). So all I have to do is unzip the pack, flip up the lid of the lowepro, and pull out the camera. Reasonably easy access, and well-protected unless I take a tumble, and if that happens, I'll probably have more to worry about than a camera!

Julie

05-07-2009, 07:16 AM   #17
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I'll second Julie's bag in the backpack solution.

If possible I carry the camera around my neck with the original neckstrap in the shortest possible length (still got to shoot conveniently) but that's not an option in the wild country I agree. However, in colder weather I just put the camera on the neckstrap under the jacket, so I just have to unzip the jacket and take the lenscap off.

I'm still looking for a tilt-option for the neckstrap suspension to switch to the position that Mickey has shown in his photo for longer lenses.

Those Lowepro hip bags look nice also.
Best, Georg (the other)
05-07-2009, 08:55 AM   #18
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For anything like that, I just put a couple of Domke inserts in my actual courier bag, (Bought it for work when that was actually my job: they might be a little pricey considering they aren't purpose-made for photography, but you can pretty much put anything in there. If you wear it right, it doesn't slide around and you can get at stuff by sliding it around under your arm. ) It's still also where I carry my u-lock, so it'd tend to be with me, anyway.

Got mine from a shop called CourierWare in Cambridge, MA, they make em in house and can even customize (Velcro for Domke inserts, maybe even... Also putting the strap buckle on the proper side for which side you wear it on: most couriers sling opposite from most photographers, so you want that buckle to end up up front. ) I have a suspicion that Crumpler's messenger styles may actually be decent for riding, but I've never heard much about this.

*wait a minnit, let's see what these guys are doing now... it was, after all, ten years or more ago. *

http://courierbags.com/

This is me, never thinking to look online for places I went in person before I was any kind of Internet shopper.

By the way, these folks make the *best* pads for straps to anything heavy. I think my big canvas traveling bag is getting an improvement.

They even have a line of camera-bag versions. *glee* Maybe, even, they can sell me just the right insert for mine.

It's probably about as well as you can do about vibration concerns: I probably wouldn't really want to do much serious riding with a camera on the handlebars, given a choice, myself.

I think the problem with trying to sling a holster bag in that way is that it's too small and rigid to want to stay put (really shortening that strap might help, there, though. More than you'd ordinarily consider doing.)

Last edited by Ratmagiclady; 05-07-2009 at 09:18 AM.
05-09-2009, 06:36 AM   #19
Ira
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QuoteOriginally posted by foxglove Quote
The trick is, don't rest!

I got back on my bike yesterday after the winter break. This morning was pretty painful... for about 5 minutes. Then I guess the pain receptors just got tired, and gave up! It's the same story every year - the first ride is great, the second is awful for 5 minutes, the third for 3 minutes, and by the 4th ride I'm fine.


Julie
Who was resting? I was collapsing.

If I'm taking my second ride later today after a full week, does that even COUNT as my second ride? Or can I expect the same ass discomfort, and I should wait another week?

Please tell me I should wait another week--and in your response, keep in mind that I'm 52.

05-09-2009, 07:34 AM   #20
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Do you wear the padded shorts?
Also the Lowepro Inverse 100 looks like a very good option! I may have to start using that in stead of my handlebar bag. My problem has always been do I take a wider lense for landscapes or something with more Mag in case I see a Bear or Deer or Bobcat or something? I tend to ride at sunrise, so usually I see something good!---Jeff
05-09-2009, 11:17 AM   #21
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Prior to having children we regularly went on bike tours and I just tossed my gear in the handlebar bag with never a problem over thousands of miles. This was in the days prior to digital and I don't know if dSLR are more sensitive to road vibrations than film SLRs but I wouldn't hesitate to do the same today. When mountain biking I'd put the camera in a padded camera bag, then into a backpack and that worked alright but much less convenient.

Usually now I carry a compact camera when cycling (Ricoh GX100) but on the odd occasion where I carry a dSLR I toss it into either a handlebar bag or my panniers and don't really give it a second thought. No problems.

I have stumbled across an interesting looking handlebar bag for a small kit which I've thought about getting for my commuting bike as I haven't gotten a handlebar bag for it yet. Here's the link.

As for the sore tushes, I'm sorry to say that the cycling industry is even worse than the photography industry when promoting their products and making us think we can be like the pros if we buy the "right" equipment. The majority of riders maybe ride a few miles a week or less and with that little riding one will never really get comfortable on most of today's road and mountain bikes. Commuting, touring and recumbent bikes are far more comfortable and would serve the majority of riders much better than the road and mountain bikes which are predominantly featured in stores and in advertising.

I have a commuting bike, a road bike, a mountain bike, a tandem (road style) and a recumbent bike and ride about 3,000 miles/year. I can say with authority that the comfort of the recumbent is amazing - no discomfort at all (other than fatigue) after riding 300km (186 mi) brevets. For shorter rides a commuting bike (I ride a Breezer Town Bike) is incredibly comfortable and would likely be the best choice for most people. Probably still a little butt break-in after a long layoff but with the wider seat, more upright posture and a suspension seatpost it would likely hurt a whole lot less and get comfortable a whole lot quicker than most road or mountain bikes. I ride enough that the road and mountain bikes don't bother me much, but for rides over 40 miles I much prefer the recumbent. If recumbents arouse your curiosity, there are great forums over at BentriderOnline.

Sorry about the longish post on cycling but after seeing so many people here with saddle discomfort I thought I'd offer some little known advice about my favourite recreational activity (photography is second).
05-09-2009, 11:30 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by tvfd911 Quote
What type of biking do you do? Are we talking road biking (long distance Lance Armstrong stuff), low key cruising around town/in the park, or some type of off road riding?
Ah, good question and I should have specified. For me, it's just a basic half-hour commute, 4 miles each way, in the city, all paved.

I've actually been able to get the TLZ Mini on a shoulder strap to work acceptably, by adding a little more finesse to strap/bag placement and management.
05-09-2009, 12:24 PM   #23
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Glad to hear you worked it out without having to invest in another bag.

05-09-2009, 05:42 PM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by Ira Quote
Who was resting? I was collapsing.
Oh dear! You really over-did it, didn't you?

I can sympathsize - after a long layoff, I got over-enthusiastic (and stupid) and managed to turn a short ride into a 40 km slog mostly into a wicked headwind. This was the sort of wind that, when I stopped, made mournful wailing sounds in my spokes! I was so beat when I got home I basically fell off the bike.

QuoteQuote:
Please tell me I should wait another week--and in your response, keep in mind that I'm 52.
No way! I'm an ex-competitive cyclist, so I'm a big believer in just getting out there are doing it. The longer you wait, the harder it'll be. 52 is no excuse (unless you've got a health problem) - my husband's nearly 62, and he still rides his bike! There's no way I would ever race again, I just don't have that kind of focus, but I hope to be riding my bike for a long time yet. Good luck with the backside.

Julie
05-09-2009, 07:08 PM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by stoge Quote
Do you wear the padded shorts?
Also the Lowepro Inverse 100 looks like a very good option! I may have to start using that in stead of my handlebar bag. My problem has always been do I take a wider lense for landscapes or something with more Mag in case I see a Bear or Deer or Bobcat or something? I tend to ride at sunrise, so usually I see something good!---Jeff
I've had no problem on metric centuries with my Inverse 100 with body and an extra lens. I'm planning on using it on the 5 day bike Virginia tour in June with 350+ miles. I forget I'm wearing it most of the time. It really doesn't get in the way at all. For many of my shots I stop and while still straddling the bike rotate the bag to my side, get the camera, shoot and replace.

And I agree, go with good quality bike shorts and a minimally padded saddle. Soft saddles and non padded shorts are a recipe for pain on a long ride.
05-09-2009, 08:19 PM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by foxglove Quote
No way! I'm an ex-competitive cyclist, so I'm a big believer in just getting out there are doing it. The longer you wait, the harder it'll be. 52 is no excuse (unless you've got a health problem) - my husband's nearly 62, and he still rides his bike! There's no way I would ever race again, I just don't have that kind of focus, but I hope to be riding my bike for a long time yet. Good luck with the backside.
FWIW, when I was in a bike club at 26/27/28 years old, the guys in their 60s and 70s would regularly ride me into the ground. One ancient dude would ride the 150-mile weekly ride starting at 5am and then ride other rides in the evening.
05-09-2009, 09:53 PM   #27
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I'm surprised noone has mentioned OP/TECH USA Bino/Cam Harness webbing - Chest harness.

For less than $10 delivered, you can't lose.

05-09-2009, 10:56 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by SOldBear Quote
I'm surprised noone has mentioned OP/TECH USA Bino/Cam Harness webbing - Chest harness.

For less than $10 delivered, you can't lose.

SOldBear,

Go back to page one of this thread. Not only did I mention it but I gave a very negative opinion of it.
Using it while on a bike puts your camera in harm's way as well as being very annoying and uncomfortable.

Mickey
05-10-2009, 06:46 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by rpriedhorsky Quote
FWIW, when I was in a bike club at 26/27/28 years old, the guys in their 60s and 70s would regularly ride me into the ground. One ancient dude would ride the 150-mile weekly ride starting at 5am and then ride other rides in the evening.
I knew one of those, a friend of my parents. For his 70th birthday (I think... maybe it was only his 65th) my father made him a funny card with a "geriatricycle". It included a special holder for a long, flowing beard, among other things. I should see if he kept the original drawing!
05-10-2009, 06:51 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by SOldBear Quote
I'm surprised noone has mentioned OP/TECH USA Bino/Cam Harness webbing - Chest harness.
I have one, I use it out hiking, and highly recommend it if you dislike regular neck straps. The harness even works fine with a backpack on top of it, and the quick release snaps are great. But, it would be horrible on a bike. Yes, it keeps the camera from swinging out as far as a regular strap, but it does still move a lot.
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