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08-24-2013, 08:37 AM - 1 Like   #196
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paulh - I can't tell for sure but that looks like a Grey Hairstreak, one of the Hairstreaks anyway. You don't see their wings open like that very often, only in cooler conditions when they need to warm up some. All butterflies can't fly till their body temp reaches about 85 F. Hairstreaks usually keep their wings folded when perched, they collect enough heat without opening them so the darker insides can catch some sun. I've only seen one do that in 6 or 8 years of watching and photographing them.

Couple more with the binocluar lens rig from the past few days.

Gulf Fritillary visiting my Hummingbird feeder



Grey Hairstreak, slightly bigger than a dime



Dime sized Checkered Skipper



08-27-2013, 12:47 PM - 1 Like   #197
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one from last Spring:

08-28-2013, 04:50 PM - 1 Like   #198
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L'il guy was too cold to fly.
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08-28-2013, 05:20 PM   #199
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I haven't been out much and the butterflies around the house refuse to land on anything. I got this one at one of my river parks. Wind was blowing pretty hard that day. I didn't think it would come out as good as it did. Thank goodness for higher shutter speeds and sunshine.



12-22-2013, 08:02 AM - 1 Like   #200
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QuoteOriginally posted by Paleo Pete Quote
paulh - I can't tell for sure but that looks like a Grey Hairstreak, one of the Hairstreaks anyway.
I'm not sure which of paulh's photos is being referred to here. The photo in posting #191 looks to be one of the blues. There are a few hairstreaks that have some blue on the upperside, but most of them have tails. I'm pretty sure it's not a Grey Hairstreak in any case - they don't have any blue on the dorsal wing surfaces. I'm not familiar with all the different blues that can be found down in Texas, but a quick look in my Kaufman guide shows a few possibilities ( eg. Reakirt's Blue) . ID would be easier with a photo of the ventral side.

I'd like to contribute, but with hundred's of photos to choose from, it's probably simpler to just post my website url:

Butterflies of Ontario

Cheers, RC
12-22-2013, 08:18 AM   #201
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One of the best websites I've seen on this subject!
12-22-2013, 11:14 AM - 1 Like   #202
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QuoteOriginally posted by jac Quote
One of the best websites I've seen on this subject!
Thanks!

I like your shots of the sulphur. I can't find an exact match in my Butterflies of Canada, it might be a Booth's or a Labrador Sulphur ( I'll try consulting some experts I know )

I'd really like to get up to the Far North to do some shooting someday. Hard to know when to go though - when the good bugs are flying, the bad ones are likely to be flying as well.

This is one of my most "northerly" butterfly images so far. It's a Northern Blue, and yes, it's perched on a blueberry, with lichens in the background. This was shot on the slopes of Mt. Albert, in Gaspesie National Park, QC.

Cheers, RC

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12-22-2013, 02:21 PM - 1 Like   #203
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Caught this guy taking a break on the walkway in the botanical garden butterfly conservatory... it looks almost B&W, but it did have some subtle greenish tints. No idea what it is, they only have non-native exotics...
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12-22-2013, 02:52 PM   #204
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QuoteOriginally posted by OrchidJulie Quote
Caught this guy taking a break on the walkway in the botanical garden butterfly conservatory... it looks almost B&W, but it did have some subtle greenish tints. No idea what it is, they only have non-native exotics...
Nice Shot. I'm not up on my tropical butterflies either, but I believe this one is called the "Blue Clipper" - a very common species in butterfly houses.

I looked through most of postings in this thread, and I could offer ID's for some of the unidentified North American species, and correct a few mis-identifications, but most of the postings are quite old, so I'm not sure there's much point. If any of the OP's would like me to take a stab at IDing their butterflies, please respond with your posting # and I'll give it a shot.

Cheers, RC
12-22-2013, 03:03 PM   #205
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Thanks. Yes, most of the thread is several years old... still great images, though.

Because this conservatory is in south Florida, the USDA is unbelievably strict about the way it's managed -- multiple airlock doors in and out, not one larval "food" plant inside (plenty of nectar plants and supplemental feeding spots for the adults), etc. so the butterflies cannot escape/reproduce. The garden has an outdoor butterfly garden for native species, the conservatory has only tropical exotics.

The only "complaint" I have about it is that on many occasions, it's been very crowded, often with noisy, rowdy children running about, keeping the butterflies in constant flight. Tough to get one posing for a few shots!
12-22-2013, 03:37 PM   #206
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QuoteOriginally posted by OrchidJulie Quote
Because this conservatory is in south Florida, the USDA is unbelievably strict about the way it's managed -- multiple airlock doors in and out, not one larval "food" plant inside (plenty of nectar plants and supplemental feeding spots for the adults), etc. so the butterflies cannot escape/reproduce. The garden has an outdoor butterfly garden for native species, the conservatory has only tropical exotics.

The only "complaint" I have about it is that on many occasions, it's been very crowded, often with noisy, rowdy children running about, keeping the butterflies in constant flight. Tough to get one posing for a few shots!
I think those precautions are pretty standard. They even have them here in Canada where tropical butterflies wouldn't survive for long if they escaped from a butterfly house, and where there are few ( if any ) suitable larval food plants in any case. In Florida, those precautions are understandable. Foreign butterflies can establish themselves here in NA. The Cabbage White was brought by European settlers, possibly several times. The European Skipper is thought to have been brought over to Canada in the early 20th century. Both these species are now widespread. The European Common Blue seems to be well established near Montreal, and is spreading. The jury is still out on the (European) Peacock Butterfly - they're only seen sporadically ( again, in the Montreal area ). We usually don't get too upset about new butterflies because they usually don't become pests ( Cabbage white is an exception ), but they can be just as invasive as other critters. We don't necessarily know what impact they'll have on our native species.

RE: kids running wild in the butterfly conservatory - well, it's hard to fault kids getting excited about butterflies. I understand completely.
The obvious solution is to get out and explore the wilderness - off the beaten path. You're blessed where you are - you can practically shoot butterflies outdoors 12 months of the year. It's more of a challenge, but with a bit of effort, you can get photos of species that not many other people ever see, let alone photograph. Of course, being in the wilderness doesn't guarantee that other people won't interrupt your shooting. In fact, that shot I posted earlier of the Northern Blue was an absolute nightmare. The first one I'd ever had the chance to photograph, and all these hikers were barging past me, paying no attention to the fact that I was obviously trying to photograph something.

Stupid other people!
12-22-2013, 03:49 PM   #207
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QuoteOriginally posted by jac Quote
L'il guy was too cold to fly.
Hey Jac,

I just got this from Ross Layberry, one of the authors of The Butterflies of Canada:
" the Sulphur is definitely a Colias nastes, the Labrador Sulphur."

Cheers, RC
12-22-2013, 04:02 PM   #208
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QuoteOriginally posted by arkav Quote
Thanks!

I like your shots of the sulphur. I can't find an exact match in my Butterflies of Canada, it might be a Booth's or a Labrador Sulphur ( I'll try consulting some experts I know )

I'd really like to get up to the Far North to do some shooting someday. Hard to know when to go though - when the good bugs are flying, the bad ones are likely to be flying as well.

This is one of my most "northerly" butterfly images so far. It's a Northern Blue, and yes, it's perched on a blueberry, with lichens in the background. This was shot on the slopes of Mt. Albert, in Gaspesie National Park, QC.

Cheers, RC
My bet is on Labrador Suplur=Arctc Green Sulphur, Colias nastes nastes. Jack Harry collected a few of them in Iqaluit awhile back. Probably female due to the larger pink eye-spot.
Thanks, John
12-23-2013, 06:40 AM   #209
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@arkav... right. Don't want to sound like a scrooge, regarding the kids being excited about seeing the butterflies, surely the experience is important on many levels! I'm just a bit of a grump about the screaming and yelling (much of it gratuituous, nothing at all to do with seeing butterflies, just badly socialized kids who scream and yell no matter where they are)

Now that the weather is improving, I do hope to be able to get farther out for observing and shooting.
12-23-2013, 07:09 AM   #210
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QuoteOriginally posted by arkav Quote
Hey Jac,

I just got this from Ross Layberry, one of the authors of The Butterflies of Canada:
" the Sulphur is definitely a Colias nastes, the Labrador Sulphur."

Cheers, RC
Unfotunately, I left my copy of B. of Canada in Clyde River when I came down here to Cape Dorset a few years back. As noted, the source I used was Jack Harry, another co-author.
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