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11-15-2018, 03:26 AM - 1 Like   #8071
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QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
French Fry Hawk
I would contact National Geographic about that one, a new species,which I have not heard of before! Its so interesting, a cross between a raptor and a seed eater!

Yellow Billed Egret


11-15-2018, 06:43 AM   #8072
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QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
French Fry Hawk
I think we here in the USA refer to that as a "Freedom hawk."

Fish (in case you didn't recognize it).
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11-15-2018, 07:13 AM   #8073
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
I think we here in the USA refer to that as a "Freedom hawk."

Fish (in case you didn't recognize it).
Here in Canada we actually call it something else...____ hawk.....rhymes with kit....could mean a pellet if you dearly want to know. Personally, I like the freedom moniker; they do seems to love to fly...and eat fries ;-)
11-15-2018, 08:10 AM   #8074
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Here's another Yeallow Billed Egret, which I encountered yesterday @ Zoo Lake. Perhaps a bit too early from the nest, was being harassed at one stage by some Indian Mynas. I hope it survives, though I did see another one today, foraging at the hedge at Zoo Lake.


11-15-2018, 08:52 AM   #8075
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You're very lucky to have a zoo close enough to visit regularly. The nearest large zoo for me would mean an all-day expedition, and driving either to Boston (yuck) or The Bronx (horrors!!).

Banded mongoose.
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11-15-2018, 10:07 AM   #8076
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Jackal
11-15-2018, 01:41 PM   #8077
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Penguin - aquarium specimen.

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11-16-2018, 02:20 AM   #8078
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Yellow Mongoose
11-16-2018, 07:47 AM   #8079
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Pin-tailed whydah
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11-16-2018, 09:26 AM   #8080
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
Also GOOGLE "Microraptor" to see what one of the more famous, legitimate feathered dinosaurs looks like.
Unfortunately, Micropator lacks salient theropod dinosaur features that are necessary for fully upright posture, i.e., the pelvis and the hip and shoulder joints are very unlike those of theropods but very similar to basal archosaurs. Microraptor can only be a legitimate, basal bird.
(Czerkas, S. A., and A. Feduccia. 2014. Jurassic archosaur is a non-dinosaurian bird. Journal of Ornithology 155:581-851.)

To quote Storrs Olson again:
If Caudipteryx is not a feathered dinosaur, what about all those other supposed feathered dinosaurs from China that the public has recently been bombarded with? To be succinct, there are none. The whole story is essentially a hoax. Numerous specimens of various theropod dinosaurs from the Liaoning Lake deposits are preserved with associated carbonized filaments often positioned so as to appear to be integumentary structures. None of this ‘‘dinofuzz’’ exhibits the structure of a pennaceous feather. Furthermore, there reportedly are in the same deposits various other organisms, unrelated to birds or theropods, that sport those same filaments. If so, the information has been suppressed.

The BADM [Birds as Dinosaurs Movement] has been putting imaginary feathers on dinosaurs for more than 20 years (Battaglia 1979), but real fossils with feathers were crucial to making the bird–dinosaur connection. So when the filament adorned dinosaur fossils turned up in China there was little hesitation about hyping them as feathered dinosaurs. Not surprisingly, an entirely conjectural origin of feathers from filaments was hastily supplied (Prum 1999). Feathers are preserved in the fossil record in a unique manner that is easily recognizable with scanning electron microscopy (Davis and Briggs 1995), but that was not done for the Chinese fossils before they were so enthusiastically presented as feathered dinosaurs.
...
It is clear that raising any question whatever about the theropod origin of birds is unacceptable to those in the BADM. Prum (2002:5) ironically refers to the ‘‘unrelenting criticism’’ of the theory, when in reality the voices of criticism have for the most part been drowned out by the incessant
petarade of propaganda from the BADM. Prum’s own essay is little more than naked proselytizing, designed to cajole the heathen onto the path of enlightenment. Like a harassed politician, Padian (p. 485) blames the media for helping to keep controversy alive and bemoans the fact that the BADM agenda is diminished by what he regards as an inappropriate attempt on the part of reporters to achieve balance and fairness.

It is often emphasized in publications of the BADM that its opponents are unscientific. Padian has maintained that the truth has been revealed and that contrary views should be suppressed. Prum (2002:13) exhorts ornithologists to ‘‘abandon debate on the theropod origin of birds.’’ In my view, that is the most unscientific posture of all. What are these people afraid of? If the evidence for a theropod origin of birds is so overwhelming, why can it not stand on its own merits without active suppression of contrary views, without proselytizing the noncombatants, and without a vigorous propaganda campaign in the popular press?
(Olson, S. L. 2002. [Book revew] New Perspectives on the Origin and Early Evolution of Birds. Proceedings of the International Symposium in Honor of John H. Ostrom. Auk 119:1202-1205.)

Last edited by pete-tarmigan; 11-16-2018 at 10:22 AM.
11-16-2018, 09:53 AM   #8081
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Juvenile Bateleur Eagle doing some preening
11-16-2018, 11:52 AM   #8082
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I'm not sure where Olson is now, but he is very much of an outlier, rather akin to those geologists who for years, even decades, denied plate tectonics ("continental drift"). When a new paradigm arises, there are always some stubborn old timers who refuse to accept. Olson is simply wrong in his criticisms. The number of specimens that have been found, and the number of highly regarded paleontologists who have personally inspected them, have long since relegated poor Olson to the uniformed fringe. In plain language, he does not wantbirds to be dinosaurs because that it what he was taught and what he spent almost his entire career thinking. He's really become a sad case. However, I'm sure that neither this comment nor any other I could make will change your mind.
11-16-2018, 11:53 AM   #8083
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Wattled lapwing
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11-16-2018, 01:57 PM   #8084
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
I'm not sure where Olson is now, but he is very much of an outlier, rather akin to those geologists who for years, even decades, denied plate tectonics ("continental drift"). When a new paradigm arises, there are always some stubborn old timers who refuse to accept. Olson is simply wrong in his criticisms. The number of specimens that have been found, and the number of highly regarded paleontologists who have personally inspected them, have long since relegated poor Olson to the uniformed fringe. In plain language, he does not wantbirds to be dinosaurs because that it what he was taught and what he spent almost his entire career thinking. He's really become a sad case. However, I'm sure that neither this comment nor any other I could make will change your mind.
Evidence-based arguments will change my mind.

Olson is Curator Emeritus at the American Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Olson, Alan Feduccia, Evgeny Kurochkin, Per Ericson and Zhonghe Zhou are all highly regarded palaeontolgists that have all personally inspected those same specimens and were all struck by the glaring errors made by Chiappe, Padian, and Prum. Olson is not an outlier among bird palaeontologists or ornithologists -- he's only and outlier if you lump him in with dinosaur palaeontologists who ignore the homology of digits from embryologic evidence (the avian hand is digits II, III, and IV as demonstrated in the Ostrich, the theropod hand is I, II, and III), the anatomy of avian and dinosaur pelvic girdles, the morphology of avian and dinosaur teeth. Theropodists know little about birds -- in the book New Perspectives on the Origin and Early Evolution of Birds. Proceedings of the International Symposium in Honor of John H. Ostrom. Jacques Gauthier and Lawrence F. Gall, Eds. 2001. Peabody Museum of Natural History, Gauthier and de Queiroz claim that tinamous were unknown to Merrem in 1813, whereas the genus Tinamus and the species T. soui was described in 1783 and three additional species of tinamous were named by Gmelin in 1789. In the same book Arnold says that some gull species lose the external hallux entirely, but all gulls have an external hallux, including the two species of kittiwakes in which it is highly reduced. Hopson’s list of birds sampled in his study places Pluvialis in the Glareolidae and contains 15 misspelled names of taxa.

Theropodists fail to include non-dinosaurs as outgroups in their cladistics, and ignore cladistics' failure to identify convergent evolution. Cladistics comes up with the absurd phylogeny in which Hesperornis, loons and grebes are placed into the same clade. The theropod origin of birds also requires flight to have evolved from the ground up, which flies in the face of the laws of physics and the multiple, independent evolution in other animal lineages of flight from the trees down. Evidence-based arguments will change my mind, not the sensationalist marketing of decomposed collagen as proto-feathers, and other fiction based on flawed techniques that Chiappe, Padian and Prum have been spewing, or the abuse of the peer-review process of scientific publication that Henry Gee committed as an editor of Nature. They are rather akin to those Lamarkians and Creationists who for decades have denied evolution by natural selection, and who history will show how uninformed and fraudulent they are. They are worse in that these Hennig Youth suppress dissent by shouting down opposition and by biasing the peer review process of publication of scientific research by selecting like-minded reviewers, e.g., barring avian palaeontologists or ornithologists from refereeing submitted manuscripts.

Last edited by pete-tarmigan; 11-18-2018 at 09:49 AM. Reason: omitted words
11-17-2018, 07:13 PM   #8085
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Cormorants. It takes a while to see how many there are because of the visually complex and distracting rocks, however, the guano deposit is a clue.
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