Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
05-07-2018, 02:12 AM   #121
Pentaxian
BruceBanner's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 5,201
QuoteOriginally posted by Jonathan Mac Quote
All the Brenizer's I've ever done have used the side-to-side method. It's possible that focus is slightly off due to this, but I take as much care as possible to only turn, not to move forward or backwards. Given that I'll usually shoot these in low-res jpegs, any loss of critical focus is so small as to be un-noticeable. The same (luckily) is true of the blue-fringing which is common with the M 85mm f/2 - in the final image it's just not visible at all.

If you're really concerned with maintaining critical focus then maybe a hybrid method could be used? I've never done it, but you could in principle get the centre shots of the subject first, then sweep side-to-side and replace the side-to-side images of the subject with the initial ones if focus is slightly off. You'd need to take care not to lose any sections around the subject but I think that could possibly give the best results.
That's what I think I'm going to try and do.

I think you understand what I mean, but just to be clear, lets say (like the shot above of the bench), if the bench is the subject, and I'm shooting very wide, then it needs to be in the CENTRE of the frame when panning across (where I obtain the best sharpness due to DoF and wide apertures, but also because that was the position of the bench in the frame at the time of obtaining focus). If the bench is too close to the top or the bottom of the frame when panning across, the focus is thrown off, softness appears etc. If I pan across and happen to get the bench nice in the middle of the frame, then it comes off good, but it feels a little like chance, depends how far up I start the pan job etc.

05-07-2018, 05:21 AM   #122
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
CharLac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Ottawa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 7,736
QuoteOriginally posted by BruceBanner Quote
That's what I think I'm going to try and do.

I think you understand what I mean, but just to be clear, lets say (like the shot above of the bench), if the bench is the subject, and I'm shooting very wide, then it needs to be in the CENTRE of the frame when panning across (where I obtain the best sharpness due to DoF and wide apertures, but also because that was the position of the bench in the frame at the time of obtaining focus). If the bench is too close to the top or the bottom of the frame when panning across, the focus is thrown off, softness appears etc. If I pan across and happen to get the bench nice in the middle of the frame, then it comes off good, but it feels a little like chance, depends how far up I start the pan job etc.
I tried this quickly on the weekend and had to bin my first attempt. NOT EASY! Kinda like panning while follwoing a moving object...practice practice practice and a dollop of luck thrown in I think.
05-07-2018, 05:28 AM - 1 Like   #123
Pentaxian
BruceBanner's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 5,201
QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
I tried this quickly on the weekend and had to bin my first attempt. NOT EASY! Kinda like panning while follwoing a moving object...practice practice practice and a dollop of luck thrown in I think.
Just try a single straight line to begin with, portrait orientation, maybe 6-8 shots. I've seen some really nice shots that give the effect from even just two shots!

Case in point (not mine);
05-08-2018, 12:27 AM   #124
Pentaxian
Jonathan Mac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 8,104
QuoteOriginally posted by BruceBanner Quote
That's what I think I'm going to try and do.

I think you understand what I mean, but just to be clear, lets say (like the shot above of the bench), if the bench is the subject, and I'm shooting very wide, then it needs to be in the CENTRE of the frame when panning across (where I obtain the best sharpness due to DoF and wide apertures, but also because that was the position of the bench in the frame at the time of obtaining focus). If the bench is too close to the top or the bottom of the frame when panning across, the focus is thrown off, softness appears etc. If I pan across and happen to get the bench nice in the middle of the frame, then it comes off good, but it feels a little like chance, depends how far up I start the pan job etc.
For some reason almost all my Brenizers have the subject more-or-less dead centre. I'd never really thought about it before but I very often use the rule of thirds or something else to guide my composition, but with Brenizers somehow that seems wrong in most cases. Of course, just when I had this thought, the shot in the post above, only a two image composite or not, just goes to show that even the rule of thirds is perfectly applicable to Brenizers.

QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
I tried this quickly on the weekend and had to bin my first attempt. NOT EASY! Kinda like panning while follwoing a moving object...practice practice practice and a dollop of luck thrown in I think.
Most difficulties in this style of shooting can be overcome with practice and care. You may initially lose shots due to missed focus or, more commonly, getting home and finding that there's a gap in coverage which forces you to severely crop and thus lose much of the Brenizer effect. Other things that can cause problems are using auto white balance when you're only shooting jpegs or finding that your metering of the overall scene was off and light areas are irrecoverably blown out. Shooting jpeg only has it's drawbacks but some of these images are from close to a hundred frames and PPing raw files is too much unless you're shooting professionally.

I find that luck only comes into when people are involved. Case in point, the giant baby face sculpture I posted as my last image. I was there taking non-Brenizer shots for a while then switched lenses and got into position for the Brenizer and as soon as I had done so, some guy appeared and loitered around the statue for five minutes chatting on his phone. As soon as he left, two women appeared and proceeded to take a multitude of shots of each other with the sculpture using their mobile phones, and this took around another ten minutes. Twice I though they'd finished and started my Brenizer only to have to scrap it when they came back and ruined it, forcing me to delete scores of frames and start again.

I may have to pack a BB guy or some stink-bombs in my photography bag the next time I plan on doing Brenizers in populated areas.

05-08-2018, 03:49 AM   #125
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
CharLac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Ottawa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 7,736
QuoteOriginally posted by Jonathan Mac Quote

I may have to pack a BB guy or some stink-bombs in my photography bag the next time I plan on doing Brenizers in populated areas.
05-08-2018, 03:37 PM   #126
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
CharLac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Ottawa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 7,736
Oh, first somewhat successful attempt...simple 7 images wide...comments? Suggestions?
Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
 Photo 
05-08-2018, 04:43 PM - 1 Like   #127
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
baro-nite's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,147
QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
Oh, first somewhat successful attempt...simple 7 images wide...comments? Suggestions?
Definitely has the effect, however I find that what really makes these work is placing the subject in its context: foreground and background elements surrounding the subject.

05-08-2018, 10:11 PM - 1 Like   #128
Pentaxian
Jonathan Mac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 8,104
QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
Oh, first somewhat successful attempt...simple 7 images wide...comments? Suggestions?
My first thought was that only the top of the image had loaded. I think you need to include more, doing a few rows below that one - the larger an area that you include in a Brenizer, the more the subject will stand out.
05-08-2018, 10:18 PM   #129
Unoriginal Poster
Loyal Site Supporter
iheiramo's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Espoo
Photos: Albums
Posts: 2,360
I've held this back, as this just a single row, but I like the effect here due to bokeh on both fore and background. This was kind of an accident. I wanted to shoot this scene for single in challenge and stitching was only way to make it with M200.

05-09-2018, 02:13 PM - 1 Like   #130
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Minimonster's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2018
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 600
Sheffield's Women of Steel. K5 with A 70-210 f4 at at 210mm. 30 shots in 3 rows of 10 but probably only used 20 or so in the final crop as my sweeps weren't even, I got wider as I went down. Stitched in Microsoft ICE.



Any advice gratefully received as I'm not sure that I have any idea what I'm doing!
05-09-2018, 10:11 PM   #131
Pentaxian
Jonathan Mac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain
Posts: 8,104
QuoteOriginally posted by Minimonster Quote
Sheffield's Women of Steel. K5 with A 70-210 f4 at at 210mm. 30 shots in 3 rows of 10 but probably only used 20 or so in the final crop as my sweeps weren't even, I got wider as I went down. Stitched in Microsoft ICE.



Any advice gratefully received as I'm not sure that I have any idea what I'm doing!
Looks like you did a decent job. Personally, I'd consider cropping the section on the right as I find the colour detracts from the subject of the photo. I'd say it's also a little under-exposed. Don't worry about having to crop a lot at the end - it's completely normal. Always try to err on the side of getting too much, rather than too little, to leave yourself plenty of leeway.
05-09-2018, 10:42 PM   #132
Pentaxian
BruceBanner's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 5,201
QuoteOriginally posted by Minimonster Quote
Sheffield's Women of Steel. K5 with A 70-210 f4 at at 210mm. 30 shots in 3 rows of 10 but probably only used 20 or so in the final crop as my sweeps weren't even, I got wider as I went down. Stitched in Microsoft ICE.



Any advice gratefully received as I'm not sure that I have any idea what I'm doing!
The effect is starting to kick in, but I feel perhaps because it's f4 you need much more frames to get a stronger DoF feel. I think those shooting very wide (f1.8 etc) can get a tremendous brenizer 'feel' from just a few shots (like that office one above, just 2 shots!), other lenses and apertures are going to need a lot more.
Whenever I have been really impressed with Brenizer, it's upwards of 100 shots! Yeh... 100!

In your example the framing looks off as there is too much floor and not enough above their heads to even things out. I don't mind the distraction on the right, but I (personally) would give up on this being a brenizer shot and just salvage and make it a good shot by cropping to even things out a bit.
But hey don't listen to me, that would be like the blind following the blind!
05-10-2018, 10:51 AM   #133
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
CharLac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Ottawa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 7,736
Question - do you use ICE for "bunches" of shots? i.e. stitch together 6 shots then another six and another six....and then stitch the stitches together?
05-10-2018, 11:33 AM   #134
Pentaxian
BruceBanner's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 5,201
QuoteOriginally posted by CharLac Quote
Question - do you use ICE for "bunches" of shots? i.e. stitch together 6 shots then another six and another six....and then stitch the stitches together?
I just whack em all in, 30 or so, it figures them out

EDIT: What I will say tho is... you might get an exposure issue if say one side of the panorama has blown highlights and the other side not. So what you could do is take a single image first, fire up LR, tweak that single still image so that you get it to look the way you want. Then 'Sync' the rest of the panorama shots to the single edit you have completed, then quickly go through the panorama shots and see if any frames have issues and adjust accordingly. You might have greater success in this method than first creating the stitch and then editing as if it is one large pic... I guess it's just another option to consider and way to tackle brenizer shots.
05-10-2018, 11:36 AM   #135
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
CharLac's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Ottawa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 7,736
QuoteOriginally posted by BruceBanner Quote
I just whack em all in, 30 or so, it figures them out
Lucky you....I must be doing something wrong....they have not been stitching properly
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
background, brenizer, brenizer method, distance, idea, look, method, play, results, shot, shots, subject
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Landscape Playing with the Brenizer method VaughnA Post Your Photos! 8 01-30-2011 07:04 PM
Brenizer for Impatient people!!! dlacouture Photographic Technique 6 01-21-2011 01:57 PM
Diagonal Method Sparkle General Talk 9 01-05-2011 09:22 PM
Your most basic PP method? KierraElizabeth Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 31 08-03-2009 11:21 PM
Archiving Your Photos: What's Your Method? vinzer Photographic Technique 17 01-09-2009 11:36 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:57 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top