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02-18-2017, 04:10 PM - 4 Likes   #16
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I am subscribing to this thread!
My 1st contribution from already published images.. will need to look at my other photos I certainly have many to publish here in thsi new thread!


Noctuelle cuivrée / Copper Underwing [Amphipyra pyramidoides]
by Sylvain Cote, sur Flickr


Noctuelle cuivrée / Copper Underwing [Amphipyra pyramidoides]
by Sylvain Cote, sur Flickr

02-18-2017, 05:19 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by Weevil Quote
I am subscribing to this thread!
Very good news Sylvain, and excellent additions to this thread. Thanks




In Australia we have a mixed climate, but only so many little critters here. The contributions from you all so far have been very enlightening to me. Thanks for the contributions so far, and looking forward to many more in the future !!
02-20-2017, 06:43 AM - 1 Like   #18
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Argyrotaenia franciscana - Orange Tortrix





This pest was tentatively identified by an entomologist friend of mine as the Light Brown Apple Moth which is a serious threat to agriculture. However in the first photo above I was able to capture a larvae and chrysalis. I sent the adult that emerged to an entomologist with State of California Department of Food and Agriculture who identified it as the Orange Tortrix moth which very similar to the LBAM. The Orange Tortrix is a pest too but not as bad as the LBAM.

The second photo I took years ago with my Minolta X-700 film camera and macro bellows. The larvae dropped down from the plant when playing dead / imitating a twig didn't work. If you look to the right you can see its silk safety line. These pests really chew up my plants and can move surprisingly fast.
02-20-2017, 11:19 AM - 2 Likes   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by Weevil Quote
My 1st contribution
Nice images. Great DOF on the first image for f6.3. How big is the subject, and how far away were you, if you happen to recall?

QuoteOriginally posted by Not a Number Quote
the Orange Tortrix moth
Thanks for the info and natural history on the larva & adult.

---------- Post added 02-20-17 at 12:58 PM ----------

Xposted. Junior, Jumbo and Friends pretty much munched last year's tomato season short, despite my sister's best efforts to "thin the herd."

by


Last edited by rgknief60; 02-20-2017 at 11:59 AM.
02-20-2017, 05:56 PM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by rgknief60 Quote
How big is the subject, and how far away were you, if you happen to recall?
Humm the subject was maybe around 1½ in long, and I was maybe 1 ½ - 2 feet distance if I recall well...
I was also surprised with the DOF, but on the 1st, the grub was really perpendicular so it helped!
02-21-2017, 10:02 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by rgknief60 Quote
Xposted. Junior, Jumbo and Friends pretty much munched last year's tomato season short, despite my sister's best efforts to "thin the herd."
Excellent addition to this thread Roger. Thanks.
03-09-2017, 10:07 PM   #22
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Apologies for the hairy arm !!

Was in the garden today hunting for suitable targets, when this little one fell on my arm. Had to shoot one handed with my K-3 + grip and the 100 WR + 1.4 rear converter. I put it on the fence for the 2nd image. Much easier 2 handed.
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03-26-2017, 10:13 PM   #23
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Note to self !!!

Almost posted a photograph of what I thought to be insect eggs. Did some googlin' and discovered it was poop !!!
NOTE TO SELF - Insect poop on top of the leaves, insect eggs on underside of leaves.

04-03-2017, 12:49 AM   #24
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Beetle larvae

I opened the lid of the compost bin to put in some food scraps, and the rim had about 50 beetle larvae scuttling about. Ran inside to get my camera and returned to find only about 10 left. Got as many as I could before the rest " jumped " into the bin. They do not like light much. These were about 1/2 an inch long. K-3 with the 100 2.8 WR + Sigma EM 140 DG Ring Flash.
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04-03-2017, 04:32 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by pjv Quote
Almost posted a photograph of what I thought to be insect eggs. Did some googlin' and discovered it was poop !!!
NOTE TO SELF - Insect poop on top of the leaves, insect eggs on underside of leaves.
FYI: Some of the small moths (Microlepidoptera), sit atop leaves camouflaged as bird droppings. What organisms will do to survive.
04-03-2017, 04:58 AM   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
FYI: Some of the small moths (Microlepidoptera), sit atop leaves camouflaged as bird droppings. What organisms will do to survive.
I would enjoy some photographs of them here if you have them Walt.
04-03-2017, 05:05 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by pjv Quote
I would enjoy some photographs of them here if you have them Walt.
Don't think there are any of my own. Those I used in either evolution or ecology classes came from other sources. I may have overlooked local species, thinking they were - guess what?
04-03-2017, 05:29 AM - 4 Likes   #28
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Another great thematic thread Peter. I'm pretty fascinated with the whole insect life cycle, and the past few years I've raised many Lepidoptera from the egg or caterpillar stage for both ID purposes and to photograph the life stages. I may have put these two on PF before, I'm not sure (some lighting info is on Flickr if you follow the link)

A Hyalophora cecropia caterpillar (giant silk moth). I've bred them the past couple years, great fun! This is the 4th stage of caterpillar, one more to go and then pupa time.




A Vanessa virginiensis, American Painted Lady Butterfly. This is it's final size before pupating (photo is 1:1 magnification on APS-C). Host plant here is Antennaria neglecta, Field Pussytoes).


04-03-2017, 05:44 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
I'm pretty fascinated with the whole insect life cycle,
Thanks Brian. Welcome aboard this thread too mate. Wonderful images you have started with, thanks for posting them. I too find the little critters amazing. It fascinates me too how the insect life cycle works, as the pupal and larval stages of their lives bear absolutely no resemblance to the finished article.
04-03-2017, 06:00 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
A Hyalophora cecropia caterpillar (giant silk moth). I've bred them the past couple years, great fun! This is the 4th stage of caterpillar, one more to go and then pupa time.
The Hyalophora is perfectly illuminated; a beautiful image,
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