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03-19-2017, 02:41 PM - 2 Likes   #901
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
do you know whether that specific B 25 saw action in a combat zone??

where??

The original Tondelayo was B25 airframe 41-30669, a model B-25D-20.

The plane served in the South Pacific. It was crashed a couple of times, recovered, repaired and returned to combat. The listing on pacificwrecks.com is unclear as to the disposition of the airframe postwar.



The airframe I flew is 44-28932, a B-25J-15/17-NC, currently owned by the Collings Foundation in Stowe, MA. The plane was delivered after the war, so it never saw actual combat missions. It was used as a military transport plane, then retired form military service. It saw duty as a fire bomber,


From the USAF serial number search database:

QuoteQuote:
28932 (MSN 108-33257) to MASDC Dec 1958. To civil registry as N3476G in 1959. Crashed at Minute Man Field, Stowe, MA Jun 10, 1987. Rebuilt. Name changed to Tondelayo in 2002. Was under restoration by Collings Foundation, MA as N3476G. Now listed for sale by Courtesy Aircraft. Flying since Nov 2005 in New Smyrna Beach, FL.
Lots of historical entries about Tondelayo mention the Doolittle Raid, but never confirm if the original Tondelayo participated.


QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
regarding your "right seat" time

was it flying or were you just hogging the seat when it was grounded???
The right seat of an airplane is considered the co-pilots position. The seat has full controls, and the aircraft can be flown from wither seat. I had control of the airplane from the moment the wheels left the ground to the instant just before they touched the runway again. I did not operate the landing gear, and only had limited throttle control.

It went a bit like this:

The pilot, a commercial pilot who's day job is flying freighters for FedEx, discussed my experience, the cockpit controls, in flight communication protocols, and handing the controls back and forth during flight. He told me as soon as the plane left the runway he would hand over tome, and I was to "Take it up to 3,000 feet, turn left, and trim it for straight and level flight.

So I did. We took off on runway 16R, departure to the South, and after following the takeoff directions we were headed East. After getting the plane trimmed he asked where I wanted to go. I replied, "Well, I live about 30 miles that way", and pointed to the Northeast. The reply was, "Well, you're driving!"

Following the roads and highways below I navigated by the seat of my pants. Having logged lots of hours flying my mom's plane over the last 40 years I know my way around the region. I flew East along Highway 2 until I saw Monroe, then turned North along Wood's Creek Road. A few minutes later I saw a road that leads to a town not far from my home, Granite Falls. I was looking for a cell phone tower on a mountain a couple miles from my house. I spied one, then two, then three. Guess there are more than I can see from the house.

I spotted the house, and just before I turned towards it the guy asked about a road winding its way along a river below, with mountain ridges on wither side. I explained it is the Mount Loop Highway, a scenic drive through the wilderness that goes deep into the Cascade range from Granite Falls, then loops past the mining town of Monte Christo, turns to gravel and comes out at Darrington, a logging town about 50 miles to the North. He asked if there were any power lines along the road. I told him there isn't even electricity up there.

So he said, "Drop down between the ridges and follow the canyon."

And I did.

He said that flying at 270 miles an hour a few hundred feet above the trees down low is how these planes were meant to fly. Low and fast, below the radar, like running a sports car along a twisty road. In the turns sometimes the wings were perpendicular to the ground I was turning so hard. Pop up at the last minute, drop the bomb load, then turn and burn.

I was having the time of my life!

It was fun. At those speeds it didn't take but a few minutes to reach Barlow Pass (where the highway turns towards Darrington and a spur splits off to Monte Christo), then pull up with a wingover turn and head to my house. Once over my house, again, flying fairly low, I banked the plane into a slow turn over the house, right wing pointing down at the house, and gave him the controls. I grabbed my camera and shot a couple quick snaps, then took the plane back, pulled out of the banked turn and went back up to 3,000 feet.

He told me it was time to think about heading back to Pain Field, so I pointed the plane that way. I asked him how fast the plane would go. We had been cruising at 260 to 270, and he reached out and pushed the throttle levers fully forward. The radial engines jumped in speed, and the acceleration pushed us hard into the seats. I've driven a lot of very fast cars in my life and none have ever had that kind of acceleration. I watched as the speed indicator rapidly climbed. The plane was shaking and bucking its way through the air. When the needle was somewhere over 300 he pulled the throttles back and laughed, "OK, that's enough. This thing will go faster, but it is old and we don't want to rip the wings off."

As we settled back into cruising mode I heard him asking the tower for approach clearance. As the tower gave instructions for direction, altitude and speed I automatically adjusted the course as we made our way back. He took the plane back just before touchdown, we landed and I was drunk for a few weeks on the adrenaline rush.

Even today it gives me chills just thinking about it.


Last edited by Racer X 69; 03-19-2017 at 02:52 PM.
03-19-2017, 02:47 PM - 2 Likes   #902
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
. . .

The right seat of an airplane is considered the co-pilots position. The seat has full controls, and the aircraft can be flown from wither seat. I had control of the airplane from the moment the wheels left the ground to the instant just before they touched the runway again. I did not operate the landing gear, and only had limited throttle control.

It went a bit like this:

The pilot, a commercial pilot who's day job is flying freighters for FedEx, discussed my experience, the cockpit controls, in flight communication protocols, and handing the controls back and forth during flight. He told me as soon as the plane left the runway he would hand over tome, and I was to "Take it up to 3,000 feet, turn left, and trim it for straight and level flight.

So I did. We took off on runway 16R, departure to the South, and after following the takeoff directions we were headed East. After getting the plane trimmed he asked where I wanted to go. I replied, "Well, I live about 30 miles that way", and pointed to the Northeast. The reply was, "Well, you're driving!"

Following the roads and highways below I navigated by the seat of my pants. Having logged lots of hours flying my mom's plane over the last 40 years I know my way around the region. I flew East along Highway 2 until I saw Monroe, then turned North along Wood's Creek Road. A few minutes later I saw a road that leads to a town not far from my home, Granite Falls. I was looking for a cell phone tower on a mountain a couple miles from my house. I spied one, then two, then three. Guess there are more than I can see from the house.

I spotted the house, and just before I turned towards it the guy asked about a road winding its way along a river below, with mountain ridges on wither side. I explained it is the Mount Loop Highway, a scenic drive through the wilderness that goes deep into the Cascade range from Granite Falls, then loops past the mining town of Monte Christo, turns to gravel and comes out at Darrington, a logging town about 50 miles to the North. He asked if there were any power lines along the road. I told him there isn't even electricity up there.

So he said, "Drop down between the ridges and follow the canyon."

And I did.

He said that flying at 270 miles an hour a few hundred feet above the trees down low is how these planes were meant to fly. Low and fast, below the radar, like running a sports car along a twisty road. In the turns sometimes the wings were perpendicular to the ground I was turning so hard. Pop up at the last minute, drop the bomb load, then turn and burn.

I was having the time of my life!

It was fun. At those speeds it didn't take but a few minutes to reach Barlow Pass (where the highway turns towards Darrington and a spur splits off to Monte Christo), then pull up with a wingover turn and head to my house. Once over my house, again, flying fairly low, I banked the plane into a slow turn over the house, right wing pointing down at the house, and gave him the controls. I grabbed my camera and shot a couple quick snaps, then took the plane back, pulled out of the banked turn and went back up to 3,000 feet.

He told me it was time to think about heading back to Pain Field, so I pointed the plane that way. I asked him how fast the plane would go. We had been cruising at 260 to 270, and he reached out and pushed the throttle levers fully forward. The radial engines jumped in speed, and the acceleration pushed us hard into the seats. I've driven a lot of very fast cars in my life and none have ever had that kind of acceleration. I watched as the speed indicator rapidly climbed. The plane was shaking and bucking its way through the air. When the needle was somewhere over 300 he pulled the throttles back and laughed, "OK, that's enough. This thing will go faster, but it is old and we don't want to rip the wings off."

As we settled back into cruising mode I heard him asking the tower for approach clearance. As the tower gave instructions for direction, altitude and speed I automatically adjusted the course as we made our way back. He took the plane back just before touchdown, we landed and I was drunk for a few weeks on the adrenaline rush.

Even today it gives me chills just thinking about it.
I think you may have made some people very jealous
03-19-2017, 02:54 PM   #903
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
I think you may have made some people very jealous
I'm jealous of myself sometimes.
03-19-2017, 02:56 PM   #904
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This is pretty awesome. Several 360 photos of the Collings Foundation plane Tondelayo.

North American B-25J, Mitchell, ... a look inside

03-19-2017, 06:05 PM - 1 Like   #905
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Fokker D.VII at the Air Force Museum
03-19-2017, 06:25 PM - 3 Likes   #906
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a scale model hanging from the roof of one of the hangers of the Combat Air Museum

WWI German Rumpler-Taube (scale flying replica) 52 % of original

The plane was very popular and was used by the air forces of Germany, Italy and Austria-Hungary. When the wings were painted with clear nitrate dope over linen, the plane became virtually transparent and impossible to see against a clear sunny sky. This made the Taube the "Stealth Bomber" of its time, as the combatants on the ground below could hear the aircraft but not see it. Awkward and fragile as it seems, the Rumpler-Taube was a very graceful design for the day. It was so stable that the pilots would climb out of the cockpit and lie on the wing, waving to people on the ground, while the plane made great sweeping circles around the airfield.

The Taube was the first plane to bomb Paris on August 30, 1914 . . . It was also the first plane to bomb London as well as acting as flying escorts for the Zeppelin raids over England. Over 54 different variants were made and it flew throughout the whole war. The lack of a rudder and the wing warping (rudder) design made this plane difficult and slow to turn. Subsequently the plane became an easy target for the faster and more mobile allied warplanes. Therefore, six months into the war, the Taube was removed from active duty over the front lines and used instead to train new pilots or as surveillance aircraft.

This 52% scale replica was built by Dick and Sharon Starks of Parkville, MO over a 7-year period. It flew in numerous air shows as part of the Kansas City Dawn Patrol in the Midwest during 2004 and 2005 (see photos below) before being donated to the Combat Air Museum in 2006. It flew under the registration N1914S

Armament: Rifles, pistols and hand dropped bombs

WW1 German Taube (scale flying replica)
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PENTAX K-3  Photo 
03-19-2017, 07:50 PM - 2 Likes   #907
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More Being Founder's Day stuff.

A Model 40C mail plane. It also has 4 passenger seats. Although the compartment is cramped, the leather and wood look inviting. First class travel without the stewardess serving cocktails.




Cozy.




The pilot doesn't get a nice, shielded place to sit.




The early days of commercial aviation.

03-20-2017, 04:45 PM - 2 Likes   #908
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Cessna LC-126A (195)


03-20-2017, 06:03 PM   #909
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
That is a Douglas DC3A.

Earhart was flying a Lockheed Model 10 Electra.
I have to assume that you are correct, however the information I received was right off of the plaque that sits in front of the aircraft. They have been incorrect on occasion in the past. Thanks for your comment.

Tony

Last edited by Tonytee; 03-20-2017 at 06:37 PM.
03-20-2017, 06:15 PM   #910
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
I have to assume that you are correct, however the information I received was right off of the plaque that sits in front of the aircraft. They been incorrect on occasion in the past. Thanks for your comment.

Tony
They do look similar, at first glance, does the DC 3A have a split tail

Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra 10E Special, NR16020 - This Day in Aviation
03-20-2017, 06:44 PM   #911
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
They do look similar, at first glance, does the DC 3A have a split tail

Amelia Earhart's Lockheed Electra 10E Special, NR16020 - This Day in Aviation
I'm afraid I cannot answer your question because we were not allowed beyond the area that was cordoned off. Interestingly enough according to the guide, he stated that Ms. Earhart was a very impatient person and refused to take the aircraft up on a trial run in operating the new radio system that had just been installed. In addition, she refused to learn Morse Code and therefore was unable to communicate with the US Naval Vessel waiting for her to transmit coordinates to Howland Island for refueling and anything else. Thanks for your feedback. A very nice looking aircraft though and I am also informed that it was eventually used as a mail carrier throughout WWII.

Rgds,

Tony
03-20-2017, 07:15 PM   #912
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
They do look similar, at first glance, does the DC 3A have a split tail
The tail on the airplane in the photo Tony posted is a single vertical fin. There are many other distinguishing features specific to the DC-3. The engine nacelles with the lower inlet for the oil coolers. The shape of the nose is distinctly different from an Electra. The windshield is different. The antennas just behind the cockpit. The passenger windows on the DC-3 are closer to square, more rectangular on the Electra.

And the DC-3 is a physically larger plane. The DC-3 weighs 25,199lbs. The Electra is 10,500lbs, less than half of the DC-3.

From the Museum website regarding that aircraft (by the way, that museum does not have an Electra on display):

QuoteQuote:
Douglas DC-3A The DC-3 is unquestionably one of the greatest airplanes ever made. First flown in service in 1936, many DC-3s are still flying today. Originally built as the DST (Douglas Sleeper Transport), the DC-3 design instantly made every other aircraft in passenger service an antique. It was ultra-modern, big and fast. First delivered to United Air Lines on November 25, 1936, and is the second oldest surviving Douglas DC-3A. Named the Mainliner Reno, it was also the first to be fitted with Pratt & Whitney supercharged engines. The Reno pioneered many of United’s routes from coast to coast. She is still airworthy today.

Last edited by Racer X 69; 03-20-2017 at 08:22 PM.
03-20-2017, 07:53 PM - 1 Like   #913
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
The tail on the airplane in the photo Tony posted is a single vertical fin. There are many other distinguishing features specific to the DC-3. The engine nacelles with the lower inlet for the superchargers. The shape of the nose is distinctly different from an Electra. The windshield is different. The antennas just behind the cockpit. The passenger windows on the DC-3 are closer to square, more rectangular on the Electra.

And the DC-3 is a physically larger plane. The DC-3 weighs 25,199lbs. The Electra is 10,500lbs, less than half of the DC-3.

From the Museum website regarding that aircraft (by the way, that museum does not have an Electra on display):
oops

at least they had some similarity, they did have engines, wings and could fly, right??

and I continue to learn

I think that the DC 3 was considered quite a work horse, I hope I am right about that at least
03-20-2017, 08:55 PM   #914
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aslyfox Quote
I think that the DC 3 was considered quite a work horse, I hope I am right about that at least
The DC-3 is still in commercial cargo service today.

The first DC-3 aircraft were built beginning in 1936, production continuing to 1942 for civilian versions, and to 1950 for military versions, with over 16,000 airplanes built. The military version, the C-47 saw service in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. Over 10,000 C-47 airplanes were built. They carried troops and supplies mostly.

In Vietnam they mounted three 7.62mm miniguns to fire out the left side of the plane.

It could loiter over the target for hours, providing suppressing fire over an elliptical area approximately 52 yd (47.5 m) in diameter, placing a round every 2.4 yd (2.2 m) during a three-second burst.

Here is a video of the minigun in action:


Awesome.


Many DC-3 aircraft are still working today, all over the world. As of 2012, DC-3 #10 is still used daily for flights in Colombia. Charter flights are available today in Canada.



The DC-3 in the post quoted below began life as a C-47, delivered in 1944. Former WWII pilot Peter J. Goutiere was 'too old' for combat flying, so he worked delivering airplanes to the war front. This was a plane he delivered.

It has subsequently been restored and converted to a commercial version of the airplane, as pictured here.

QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
Some more shots from the Boeing Founder's Day event at the Museum of Flight, celebrating the 100th year of Boeing.




03-20-2017, 09:08 PM   #915
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
The DC-3 is still in commercial cargo service today.

The first DC-3 aircraft were built beginning in 1936, production continuing to 1942 for civilian versions, and to 1950 for military versions, with over 16,000 airplanes built. The military version, the C-47 saw service in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. Over 10,000 C-47 airplanes were built. They carried troops and supplies mostly.

In Vietnam they mounted three 7.62mm miniguns to fire out the left side of the plane.

It could loiter over the target for hours, providing suppressing fire over an elliptical area approximately 52 yd (47.5 m) in diameter, placing a round every 2.4 yd (2.2 m) during a three-second burst.

Here is a video of the minigun in action:

Douglas AC-47D Spooky aka "Puff, the Magic Dragon" - YouTube

Awesome.


Many DC-3 aircraft are still working today, all over the world. As of 2012, DC-3 #10 is still used daily for flights in Colombia. Charter flights are available today in Canada.



The DC-3 in the post quoted below began life as a C-47, delivered in 1944. Former WWII pilot Peter J. Goutiere was 'too old' for combat flying, so he worked delivering airplanes to the war front. This was a plane he delivered.

It has subsequently been restored and converted to a commercial version of the airplane, as pictured here.
I knew of Puff, wasn't sure what the aircraft was though

The new one has cannon as well I think
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