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11-25-2021, 08:43 AM - 1 Like   #5161
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QuoteOriginally posted by edom31 Quote
the one day i don't carry a camera, they decide to go full party mode - UPS having a gathering in a parking lots... maybe comparing packages?



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Transferring packages.

They do this all the time in peak seasons, the larger package car (what UPS calls the delivery vans) is loaded with excess parcels and takes them to the field so the smaller package cars when volume of parcels exceeds the capacity of the smaller package cars.

One will see FedEx doing the same thing.

11-25-2021, 08:55 AM - 2 Likes   #5162
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11-25-2021, 10:42 AM - 1 Like   #5163
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11-25-2021, 01:39 PM - 4 Likes   #5164
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Llangollen train station and railroad museum in Wales. The LLangollen Railroad system is a 10 mile long stretch of track with a railroad that is operated by a crew of volunteers as a historical heritage. K-10D and FA 28-80mm lens.

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11-26-2021, 02:42 AM   #5165
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QuoteOriginally posted by subsea Quote
Llangollen train station and railroad museum in Wales.
good shot
11-26-2021, 04:24 AM - 1 Like   #5166
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QuoteOriginally posted by subsea Quote
Llangollen train station and railroad museum in Wales. The LLangollen Railroad system is a 10 mile long stretch of track with a railroad that is operated by a crew of volunteers as a historical heritage. K-10D and FA 28-80mm lens.
Don't get me wrong, I love these perserved lines, but unfortunately nowadays they are the only type of railway that many people in the UK will ever have travelled on. The result is that, while dimly realising that steam locos are no longer employed, they think that in other respects all trains are still like this - slow, operationally cumbersome, and old-fashioned. It never occurs to the majority of the population to use a train for serious travel, and if you suggest it to anyone (for example if they need to travel right into the centre of a city), they look at you as if you have gone mad. I understand the attitude is even worse in the USA, although more understandable as the trains there are actually slow.
11-26-2021, 07:27 AM - 1 Like   #5167
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QuoteOriginally posted by Racer X 69 Quote
(Forgive the correction)

It is 400 (cubic inch engine), 4 barrel (carburetor, some will say 4 speed, for the transmission, but not all had manual gearboxes), 2 door.
Here is the text from the website amazingclassiccars.com The first paragraph about the origin of the 4-4-2. Later versions of the 4-4-2 (which became just 442) ad a 400 cubic inch engine, then a monstrous 455 cubic inch engine (how many gallon per mile?)

OLDSMOBILE 442 IN THE BEGINNING
The 442 began as an option package on the 1964 Olds Cutlass, and became a stand-alone model in its own right from 1968 through 1971. The name 442 supposedly stood for “4-barrel carburetor, 4-speed manual transmission, and dual exhaust”, which was the original intended configuration of the package. However, it quickly became obvious that there were a great many sales to be made to automatic buyers, so this connection was downplayed after that. Then, in ’65 they dropped in a 400 V8, and gave the name a new meaning. Now 442 stood for “400 cubic inches, 4-speeds, and dual exhaust”.

OLDSMOBILE 442 EVOLUTION
Starting out with a 330ci Police Pursuit engine in 1964, by ’65 it got a 400 with 345hp. In ’66, the ultra-rare W30 option took it up to 350hp. By ’68, the base motor was making 350hp and the W30, now a more common option package, raised it to 360hp. In 1970, at the peak of the Muscle Car Era, the 442 came with a 455 standard. The 1970 Olds 442 was the Indianapolis 500 Pace Car that year, and Olds produced a special gold and white Pace Car Replica for sale to the public. As horsepower wained, government regulation increased, and insurance prices skyrocketed, the demand for muscle cars subsided. The last classic Olds 442 muscle car was in 1972. The name 442 soldiered on for many years after that, but not on anything that we would consider a muscle car.

11-26-2021, 07:44 AM - 4 Likes   #5168
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
No offense here, just different strokes for different folks. For me the best noise from an automobile is silence. In that regard I really like the Prius. As to smells, neither gasoline nor burnt rubber appeals to my nostrils. I wince at autos and motorcycles that sound like they need a new muffler, and the odor of toxic chemicals that can cause respiratory distress is never welcome. I would never live downwind of an oil refinery nor an incinerator specializing in tire disposal.

BUT Different strokes for different folks.
I agree wholeheartedly. My favorite sound is that of the pawl springs clicking in the rear cluster of a 10-speed bicycle as it glides down a curving avenue.
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11-26-2021, 07:56 AM - 3 Likes   #5169
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North American F100 Super Saber. For several years this was regarded as the ultimate fighter jet, but as the saying goes "if it's operational, it's obsolete." I think the crushing cost of the most recent aircraft has slightly lengthened their term of service. I wince to think what may happen to the military budget following China's apparently successful test of a hypersonic missile. Must we have a super-hypersonic missile?
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11-26-2021, 10:37 AM   #5170
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QuoteOriginally posted by Lord Lucan Quote
Don't get me wrong, I love these perserved lines, but unfortunately nowadays they are the only type of railway that many people in the UK will ever have travelled on. The result is that, while dimly realising that steam locos are no longer employed, they think that in other respects all trains are still like this - slow, operationally cumbersome, and old-fashioned. It never occurs to the majority of the population to use a train for serious travel, and if you suggest it to anyone (for example if they need to travel right into the centre of a city), they look at you as if you have gone mad. I understand the attitude is even worse in the USA, although more understandable as the trains there are actually slow.
I've traveled by train in Italy, France, Spain, and Germany, and I've never seen a shortage of passengers. I suspect that the popularity of railroads depends more on things like price and convenience of schedules and routes with respect to prospective passengers needs. I also suspect that the trains I've been on in Europe had a respectable number of passengers who, like me, were tourists. Here in the US, I've been taking the Long Island Railroad into New York City since the days of steam locomotives in the 1950s and still prefer the railroad to driving. In fact the cost of parking in New York City is more than the round trip cost to take the train, by a large margin!
11-26-2021, 11:40 AM   #5171
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
Here is the text from the website amazingclassiccars.com The first paragraph about the origin of the 4-4-2. Later versions of the 4-4-2 (which became just 442) ad a 400 cubic inch engine, then a monstrous 455 cubic inch engine (how many gallon per mile?)

OLDSMOBILE 442 IN THE BEGINNING
The 442 began as an option package on the 1964 Olds Cutlass, and became a stand-alone model in its own right from 1968 through 1971. The name 442 supposedly stood for “4-barrel carburetor, 4-speed manual transmission, and dual exhaust”, which was the original intended configuration of the package. However, it quickly became obvious that there were a great many sales to be made to automatic buyers, so this connection was downplayed after that. Then, in ’65 they dropped in a 400 V8, and gave the name a new meaning. Now 442 stood for “400 cubic inches, 4-speeds, and dual exhaust”.

OLDSMOBILE 442 EVOLUTION
Starting out with a 330ci Police Pursuit engine in 1964, by ’65 it got a 400 with 345hp. In ’66, the ultra-rare W30 option took it up to 350hp. By ’68, the base motor was making 350hp and the W30, now a more common option package, raised it to 360hp. In 1970, at the peak of the Muscle Car Era, the 442 came with a 455 standard. The 1970 Olds 442 was the Indianapolis 500 Pace Car that year, and Olds produced a special gold and white Pace Car Replica for sale to the public. As horsepower wained, government regulation increased, and insurance prices skyrocketed, the demand for muscle cars subsided. The last classic Olds 442 muscle car was in 1972. The name 442 soldiered on for many years after that, but not on anything that we would consider a muscle car.
I stand corrected, thank you Walter.

Clearly the car had a variety of configurations. I recall the later versions, a mere shadow of the awesome muscle cars they once were. Emissions regulations, a growing group of drivers who couldn’t learn to drive a stick shift, and rising fuel prices eventually killed off these cars.
11-26-2021, 04:41 PM   #5172
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QuoteOriginally posted by subsea Quote
've traveled by train in Italy, France, Spain, and Germany, and I've never seen a shortage of passengers
The trains in the UK generally have plenty of passengers on board but it is a small percentage of total passenger travel. There was a massive programme of line closures in the 1960s and the remaining main lines are now at maximum capacity - fares are set high to discourage more passengers! That is why some lines are now being re-opened* and the new high speed line is being built from London to Birmingham.

* Part of the old Southern main line west of Exeter was re-opened only last Saturday. Typical negative media coverage of rail said it was for "trainspotters". I despair
11-26-2021, 11:25 PM - 1 Like   #5173
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QuoteOriginally posted by Geodude Quote
My wife's father was a mechanic for these planes, stationed in the South Pacific during WWII.
My dad was an aircraft radio and radar technician in the same theatre. Mostly New Hebridies, In his words just swapped out parts as necessary. Retold story of the visit to the airfield of the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. Victory lap he said.

Last edited by Arjay Bee; 11-26-2021 at 11:31 PM.
11-27-2021, 09:55 AM - 2 Likes   #5174
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An F-14 on the flight line at NASA Ames Research Center in preparation for their, then, annual airshow in 1980. It's a shame that we'll never see surplus planes like the F-14 flying in airshows as we do WWII planes like the Mustang!
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11-27-2021, 12:20 PM - 2 Likes   #5175
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Another view of the F-14 at Nasa Ames in 1980.
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