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04-04-2014, 06:32 AM   #16
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There's no quick, one-only answer for "which shooting mode," but here is my take (you're bound to get others).

1) SHUTTER PRIORITY ("TV") commonly used when there is fast action, sporting event or birds in flight, when you want to maintain a high shutter speed at the expense of depth-of-field.

2) APERTURE PRIORITY ("A") for general photography or when there is a reason to maintain depth-of-field, such as macro work where it is common to use f8 down even to f16. Aperture priority is also sometimes used for flash letting the camera set "X" or selecting SLOW-SPEED-SYNC to combine flash with longer exposure to fill in detail of dark areas beyond the range of the flash, or beyond the main subject being illuminated by the flash.

For some of us, there's also legacy experience in the choice of these two. Early film auto-exposure cameras made by Canon had shutter priority only, those made by Nikon & Pentax has aperture priority. As a long-time Pentax user, I learned on manual exposure, then aperture priority, so I feel more comfortable with that mode.

3) Tv-A is used when a particular shutter speed + aperture combination is desired, allowing the ISO setting to change in response to changes in light intensity.

But on a modern DSLR, more complex choices are available.

WPRESTO

04-04-2014, 06:37 AM   #17
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Most of the time I use the center spot metering and center focus. I'm generally a wildlife and macro type photographer. I'll switch to center-weighted if I'm trying to follow action and don't want the metering to vary wildly, but let the camera make that decision. I think it's also probably good for portraits. Landscape you might want the multi-segment metering. Really, though, if you're shooting in RAW you have lots of ability to raise shadows in post-processing so it becomes MOST important not to blow your highlights. If it's too bright, you've lost the data and can't recover as well. Too dark - you'll be surprised what that sensor can see...
04-04-2014, 06:39 AM   #18
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Thanks so much... I am still learning.
These are some of my pictures from earlier camera I had.
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04-04-2014, 06:49 AM   #19
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The metering modes I would select for the images you posted
1) robin - spot meter
2) tree (maple?) buds - multi-segment or averaging
3) first rose - spot
4) second rose - any method, so I would default to multi-segment
5) plant silhouette - manual and adjust after inspecting what you got (= manual trial-and-error-and-success)
6) cityscape - multisegment

Most people using a DSLR select multi-segment most of the time, spot for special purpose (such as macro/wildlife), and manual for unusual situations or to exercise full precise control.

I use multisegment for general travel/landscape/museum photography, multisegment or spot for macro/wildlife depending on my perception of the lighting situation (is background illumination substantially different from that on the subject?), "X" for some flash work, especially "studio" deep macro work with a reversed enlarging lens. I almost never use the averaging option, but experimenting suggests it almost always provides the same exposure as multisegment. Whenever practical, I review the shot immediately and adjust +/- if necessary. I favor slight (1/3 stop) underexposure as a "safety" because as someone noted above, it is generally easier to pull detail out of shadows than to recover blown-out highlights.


Last edited by WPRESTO; 04-04-2014 at 06:59 AM.
04-04-2014, 06:52 AM   #20
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Right - spot is saying you want your subject metered correctly, and don't care if the rest of the image is under or overexposed. Outdoors a lot of the time it won't matter too much - but on bright days with shadows, you'll need to be more careful. Also indoors, if you have bright lamps or windows you can screw up the subject if it's a bit darker, so center weight or spot is better.

The beauty of these new sensors is you have a lot of room to play, and they're very forgiving of underexposure.
04-04-2014, 07:52 AM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by WPRESTO Quote
The metering modes I would select for the images you posted
1) robin - spot meter
2) tree (maple?) buds - multi-segment or averaging
3) first rose - spot
4) second rose - any method, so I would default to multi-segment
5) plant silhouette - manual and adjust after inspecting what you got (= manual trial-and-error-and-success)
6) cityscape - multisegment

Most people using a DSLR select multi-segment most of the time, spot for special purpose (such as macro/wildlife), and manual for unusual situations or to exercise full precise control.

I use multisegment for general travel/landscape/museum photography, multisegment or spot for macro/wildlife depending on my perception of the lighting situation (is background illumination substantially different from that on the subject?), "X" for some flash work, especially "studio" deep macro work with a reversed enlarging lens. I almost never use the averaging option, but experimenting suggests it almost always provides the same exposure as multisegment. Whenever practical, I review the shot immediately and adjust +/- if necessary. I favor slight (1/3 stop) underexposure as a "safety" because as someone noted above, it is generally easier to pull detail out of shadows than to recover blown-out highlights.
Thanks so much for the insight...sometimes it feels u know what u are doing but its always good to make sure from the experts
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