Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
04-24-2011, 07:04 PM   #1
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Fullerton, CA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 293
external hard drive

Can I get some suggestions from those who use an external hard drive to store their photos? I am thinking of a 1 tb unit under $100. There are lots of them out there and reviews are very mixed with some units failing within a few months.
Thanks,
Tom

04-24-2011, 07:06 PM   #2
Veteran Member
Tommot1965's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Perth Western Australia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,026
ive always used Western digital HD..no problems in the 10 years Ive used them....I just picked up 2.5" usb 3.0 750 gig for $129 AU....
04-24-2011, 08:39 PM   #3
Senior Member
metalmania's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 253
First, you have to know the warranty. Some external HDDs have only 1 year warranty. In this case, just buy an internal HDD with 3-year warranty and an external enclosure.

Next, if you really want a portable HDD like 2.5", try to buy one with a power adapter, or at least with a power adapter port. No matter what they claimed the 2.5" external HDD would work on MOST machines, you will find one day your HDD just couldn't be recognized because the USB port on the mainboard cannot provide enough power.

Finally, just don't buy Seagate.
04-25-2011, 02:40 AM   #4
Pentaxian
shiner's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: N GA USA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,677
QuoteOriginally posted by metalmania Quote
First, you have to know the warranty. Some external HDDs have only 1 year warranty. In this case, just buy an internal HDD with 3-year warranty and an external enclosure.

Next, if you really want a portable HDD like 2.5", try to buy one with a power adapter, or at least with a power adapter port. No matter what they claimed the 2.5" external HDD would work on MOST machines, you will find one day your HDD just couldn't be recognized because the USB port on the mainboard cannot provide enough power.

Finally, just don't buy Seagate.
Odd, but I've never had a Seagate failure so far. But I've had a few WD Caviar Blue HDDs go tango uniform in the last 3-4 years, and one Maxtor. It seems that in general, as the capacity/density/platter speed has gone up, the reliability has plummeted.

04-25-2011, 03:23 AM   #5
Veteran Member
Frogfish's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Shanghai
Posts: 4,490
If you buy a well known brand then you really don't need to worry too much about the failure rate ... everyone has a story about one brand failing and another running perfectly ... and for the guy down the road it's vice versa. I got fed up trying to follow them all and just bought a couple from name brand offering a special discount. Anyway you should always back up in at least duplicate if not triplicate.

I have important stuff located on my Mac, also backed up to another HD with Time Machine, then all pictures are saved to another separate remote HD and then finally specific shoots are burnt onto CDs !
04-25-2011, 06:22 AM   #6
Senior Member
metalmania's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 253
QuoteOriginally posted by shiner Quote
Odd, but I've never had a Seagate failure so far. But I've had a few WD Caviar Blue HDDs go tango uniform in the last 3-4 years, and one Maxtor. It seems that in general, as the capacity/density/platter speed has gone up, the reliability has plummeted.
Seagate has the highest failure rate but that doesn't mean 100% fail. Once in a while, there are some Seagate HDDS will survive several years.

Personally I have been using two WD 2TB, three Hitachi 2TB, several Hitachi 1TB, and two Samsung 2TB HDDs. I also have some 320GB to 640GB small size Maxtor and Seagate HDDs running in the machines. I'd recommend WD and Hitachi.
04-25-2011, 09:42 AM   #7
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cleveland, OH, USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 266
Hi Tom,
I'd recommend WD.
I'm using 2 or 3 internal drives and a docking station - very convenient. Or, if you travel a lot, go with one of those small Passport(?) drives.
Good luck.
04-25-2011, 09:58 AM   #8
Veteran Member
Chex's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: The 'Stoke, British Columbia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,678
QuoteOriginally posted by shiner Quote
Odd, but I've never had a Seagate failure so far. But I've had a few WD Caviar Blue HDDs go tango uniform in the last 3-4 years, and one Maxtor. It seems that in general, as the capacity/density/platter speed has gone up, the reliability has plummeted.
I bought a 500GB Seagate, as did my folks and my brother.. after two years mine is the only one of the three still working, I also have 2 WD 1.5TB drives in enclosures and I barely ever turn on the 500GB Seagate.. the only way I feel comfortable having it is to barely ever turn it on.

04-25-2011, 10:15 AM   #9
Veteran Member
sameagle's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Boston, MA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 323
QuoteOriginally posted by metalmania Quote
Seagate has the highest failure rate but that doesn't mean 100% fail. Once in a while, there are some Seagate HDDS will survive several years.

Personally I have been using two WD 2TB, three Hitachi 2TB, several Hitachi 1TB, and two Samsung 2TB HDDs. I also have some 320GB to 640GB small size Maxtor and Seagate HDDs running in the machines. I'd recommend WD and Hitachi.
metalmania,

care to post a URL to back up your statement about seagate having the highest failure rate?

i was under the impression that WD had higher failure rates (and I have a WD drive that started to make death-clicks pretty soon after purchase and no has bad sectors where data cannot be read). i have several seagates and so far they have been solid.

i *think* i had seen data in "consumer reports" rating the hard drives for problems with seagate ahead of wd.

at any rate, it is a good idea to check the quality of the warranty for your drive. it's also a good idea to have multiple drives. (i have at least 2 copies of my important files). and lastly, you may want to consider the speed of the drive. the small drives that are powered solely by the usb connection will tend to be slower than drives with an external power source such as a wall wart. regarding usb 3.0 technology, make sure you computers can make use of that technology if you are going to pay the extra money for a drive that features 3.0. if your computers can't handle 3.0 then you are throwing your money away.

- sam
04-25-2011, 10:34 AM   #10
Senior Member
metalmania's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 253
QuoteOriginally posted by sameagle Quote
metalmania,

care to post a URL to back up your statement about seagate having the highest failure rate?

i was under the impression that WD had higher failure rates (and I have a WD drive that started to make death-clicks pretty soon after purchase and no has bad sectors where data cannot be read). i have several seagates and so far they have been solid.

i *think* i had seen data in "consumer reports" rating the hard drives for problems with seagate ahead of wd.

at any rate, it is a good idea to check the quality of the warranty for your drive. it's also a good idea to have multiple drives. (i have at least 2 copies of my important files). and lastly, you may want to consider the speed of the drive. the small drives that are powered solely by the usb connection will tend to be slower than drives with an external power source such as a wall wart. regarding usb 3.0 technology, make sure you computers can make use of that technology if you are going to pay the extra money for a drive that features 3.0. if your computers can't handle 3.0 then you are throwing your money away.

- sam
There are different "definitions" and "opinions" about failure rate. Here is a link: French Retailer Data Offers SSD Failure Rates | News | The Mac Observer

However, it doesn't mean that article is "correct". Seagate made a horrible show on the 7200.11 model. That is the most reported HDD events unfortunately.

If you have a brand HDD failed in your hand, it's 100% rate to you instead of 4% rate to the manufacturer. That's why Seagate cannot win back some users. Maybe someone didn't know that 7200.11 event will become the new Seagate user.

Anyway multiple copies is the way to go. That's why I always buy HDDs in pair. One for use, the other for backup.
04-25-2011, 10:38 AM   #11
Veteran Member
Chex's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: The 'Stoke, British Columbia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 1,678
Also for bulk storage just get a 5400 rpm drive, they build less heat and "should" last longer than their 7200rpm counter parts. The speed difference is minimal if your using it to store photos.
04-25-2011, 10:55 AM   #12
Senior Member
metalmania's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 253
After brand, now let's talk about the interface. USB 3.0 sounds good, but still not very compatible. If your motherboard has no 3.0 port, and you install a PCI-E USB 3.0 card, be prepare to meet the headache.

USB 2.0 is basic and old. Slow but get the work done.

eSATA is as fast as USB 3.0 and natively supported in Windows 7. Good? Not exactly. Not all HDDS will work in an eSATA docking station or enclosure. I have several docks and enclosures, it's like WD and Seagate work on this dock but Samsung and Hitachi will not, or whatever.

There is no perfect solution.
04-25-2011, 11:01 AM   #13
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Hoek van Holland
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,280
I used to have external hardrive, but because of a crash I bought a NAS server. And I have to say, I am happy I did that. A lot more convenient. Even if you are on the holiday, if you leave it on, you can upload your photo's straight there. It also has two 1T jharddrives, which are mirrored. if one crashes, then I still have anopther one as back-up.
04-25-2011, 11:03 AM   #14
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: N. Calif
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 2,733
QuoteOriginally posted by Chex Quote
Also for bulk storage just get a 5400 rpm drive, they build less heat and "should" last longer than their 7200rpm counter parts. The speed difference is minimal if your using it to store photos.
I agree. Just ensure that you get a good quality branded product ans also have an additional online backup storage.
04-25-2011, 12:11 PM   #15
Pentaxian
Ratmagiclady's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: GA
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 13,555
I've got one of these: I'm told it's a very good brand and... Well, it's pretty nicely-made, I think. Looks like they're about 80 bucks atm.

Newegg.com - LaCie Minimus 1TB USB 3.0 External Hard Drive 301961
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
drive, photography, photoshop
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
External Hard drive disappeared fractal Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 12 05-17-2010 06:25 PM
pentax k20d and external hard drive dstar Pentax DSLR Discussion 7 07-07-2009 07:15 AM
External Hard-Drive for $150? Opinions plz :) rdrum76 Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 3 12-23-2008 04:22 PM
Possible to copy from k20d to external hard drive directly dutch Pentax Camera and Field Accessories 5 09-01-2008 10:00 AM
External Hard drive squarerigger General Talk 9 05-20-2007 08:48 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:34 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top