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08-08-2018, 10:28 PM   #1
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Printing at home - what's the real cost?

Hello all! Noob-ish - but lighthearted - question.

This is potentially a well-beaten topic, but I am presently going through a phase where I am somewhat captivated with the idea of printing big some of my favourite photos. I'm not entirely sure why, but with the amount of time I have invested into photography as a hobby, the thought of having something "tangible" from it is appealing - more than just a JPEG on a small screen. I had a photo book printed by an online company last year, and although it was described as "premium" paper and printing, I was left rather disappointed at the colour and lack of fine detail in the printing; but beyond that I was thrilled to simply have a book with my name on it to flip through!

I would likely frame and display half-a-dozen photos at home, and perhaps archive and rotate the others through. A semi-pro photog friend of mine is also talking about setting up a small exhibition at a local shop, and I'd need a selection of prints for that too if it went ahead..

So, the idea of being able to print larger photos ( A3 size minimum ) at home is appealing to have complete control of the creative process, however I am unsure of the total cost that this would be - especially for a lower volume of printing ( possibly 20 or so initial prints, then smaller batches occasionally after that: probably 5 or 6 times a year tops for myself, probably casual printing for friends or business on the side ). I was interested to read this article about how much the ink might cost for a standard A3 print, but that is only taking into account the ink cost. I'm curious about the cost of all the other unknown extras that I may need to make it worth any time and effort: this would include the obvious expenses - such as initial cost of the printer and the cost of paper - and on top of that any other bits and pieces required.

Such as: Is a monitor calibrating tool essential? Would I need to upgrade any software for best results? ( I only have Lightroom 5 at the moment ) How would you normally mount your photos? What kind of frame would you typically use? Would you use the high-clarity glass to mount it behind? Would you buy the frames in bulk? Are there other purchases that might need to be made? Ongoing printer maintenance costs?

When I browse forums, comments, and online articles about printing, people seem to fixate on the cost of the ink alone as well as perhaps the printing heads ( for good reason on both accounts! ) - which taken into account on their own might make the venture prohibitive or justifiable; but with framing and other hardware costs on top it soon becomes harder to talk myself into even considering it.

Printing at a local shop here in Perth would likely set me back nearly $40 per A3 sized print ( 12 x 19" ), and the framing cost on top of each is even more exorbitant; so that keeps it in some semblance of balance! I haven't delved too deep into the locally available services or what is available online, but if anyone has any suggestions or experience on getting some top-quality prints in Western Australia I'm all ears.

I recently passed through a I-want-Medium-Format phase as well ( with wallet unscathed ), so feel free to talk me out of this one! Although I'll probably go through the MF phase again soon. Maybe I'll just get another photo book printed online to keep me going!

08-09-2018, 12:21 AM - 2 Likes   #2
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Without answering all your questions, I can recommend this system to deal with the cost of doing lots of prints with an inkjet -
Rihac Continuous Ink Supply Systems, CISS, Printer refills Ink & Cartridges
I use a Rhiac 'CISS' system with my Epson Workforce, with the Photo Pro Pigment Inks. A small amount of technical skill and care needed to set it up and you really should follow the instructions to the letter. Delivers HUGE cost saving compared to the tiny OEM cartridge inks and quality is the same as the OEM inks too.
08-09-2018, 02:30 AM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Focusrite Quote

Such as: Is a monitor calibrating tool essential?
I don't do large prints on my own so just adding some general thoughts.
A calibrated monitor would be nice to have, but I wouldn't call it essential for printing, I am sure many will disagree in that point. I think a calibrated monitor does more good when you share your pictures online, to get the colours of your image right for most potential viewers, but when printing yourself (at least for non commercial purposes) I think it's enough to have a general idea about the colour differences between your monitor and your printer. So basically printing one image and see if the colours are warmer or cooler as on the monitor.
I don't have a calibrated monitor but when I send my pictures for printing (I use 2 different printservices) I know that the same picture looks differently from different providers (from one I get colours slightly warmer than my monitor and the other gets colder colours, so I adjust my images accordingly)

I think your main concern will be the ink of the printer. 30-50 prints a year is not much and your ink may dry up or changes colour in time.
08-09-2018, 03:26 AM   #4
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Printing at home is about scale. If you don’t use the printer it clogs and becomes a maintenance concern.
I try to run a couple of prints per month - even making donations to local fundraising activities.

The novelty of printing a few images to rotate through a half dozen frames doesn’t justify the cash outlay.

For my busy lifestyle I do appreciate the convenience of not having run into the city or my local printer. It does take up a bit of space.

I use an Epson SC P-800. It’s a beauty of a printer. It is however limited to just 17” in width meaning I still have to send out my larger requests.

The printer and extra ink was a big cash outlay and then packages of media on top of that (and waste is the biggest impact to economics). Buying paper in bulk means I have $ tied up in future images not yet sold.

If I were to offer any advise... just send your prints out as you fancy them. Even if you don’t like the result it will be such a small waste of $ compared to the thousands you have tied up in a printer.

Printing at home will spend the money you could be investing in MF glass

08-09-2018, 05:30 AM - 1 Like   #5
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I don't know how your pricing in Australia is, but based on what I see here in the U.S., if you were OK with a max size a tad over A3, the Canon Pro 100 on sale with rebates and paper bundles is a "cheap" way to print up to 13x19. The problem is when you run out of ink, you'll spend more on a cartridge set than what the original bundle with rebates cost. It does a nice job though, and I agree, there's something really nice about printing out your photos.

Last edited by clickclick; 08-09-2018 at 08:02 AM.
08-09-2018, 06:18 AM   #6
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What you are asking depends upon a lot of variables: type of printer, size of print, how fancy a frame and/or mat, the cost of your time. Red River Paper has costed the price of just the print for a number of printers at Cost of Inkjet Printing Reports by Red River Paper. I invested in a mat cutter and have a supply of reasonably priced mat boards available to me. Now retired the cost of my time has been greatly reduced as I now have an additional 8 - 10 hours of "free" time each weekday. In the end I think it comes down to do you enjoy printing and framing your photos or are you happier to have someone else do it?
08-09-2018, 06:45 AM   #7
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Can't help with printing at home, I'm currently working with a printing studio in Vermont that does a very good job for me. I want to switch to my own printer for smaller stuff eventually though, so this post is of interest.

One thing - monitor calibrator is a must. I've tried printing from my supposedly 100% RGB monitor before, and they came out terrible. After profiling my monitor with the colormunki calibrator I saw how cold my images were, and how much I had to adjust to make sure prints look good. Prints now come looking very close to what I see on my monitor.
08-09-2018, 06:48 AM - 1 Like   #8
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I've had good results with the Canon Pro-100 as well and I find I can make 13x19 prints for about 4 USD per print. It has never had a head clog, although it does use ink cleaning itself on start up. Yes, the ink is expensive, but you don't use all colors equally, you don't have to buy a full set every time. You can get deals on paper, I have found Premiere Premium Luster to be very good and affordable. I would not use third party inks for quality photographs, and I would not fool around with various esoteric types of paper, they need special profiling to get the best results.

I'll answer your questions as best I can based on my experience (I worked in a photo lab for many years doing all kinds of printing):

Is a monitor calibrating tool essential? Would I need to upgrade any software for best results?
Not if you have a decent, newer monitor or laptop screen. Most newer, higher quality monitors are pretty good right out of the box and can usually be easily tweaked, Apple products are very good in this regard. Older monitors or cheapo laptops usually need calibration, sometimes they are too far gone to ever get a good result. With the Canon, I find that if I use the "Let printer determine colors" setting I get good and consistent results. Use consistent room lighting (not to bright or dark) when working up an image. If you can't get a good result on the first try, you will definitely find home printing expensive.


How would you normally mount your photos? What kind of frame would you typically use? Would you use the high-clarity glass to mount it behind? Would you buy the frames in bulk?

I rotate my prints (like you want to do) so I simply put tape on the back of the print and tape them to the back of the mat with clear box-sealing tape—the thin, cheap, peel-able kind. Special cloth tape for prints is available but expensive. I use a variety of frames, many are bought used, whatever fits the decor. A can of spray paint can do wonders in restoring a used frame. Kit frames are very good, but pricey. High clarity glass (also known as museum glass) is great, but really expensive and needs careful cleaning to avoid fingerprints. I know photographers who sell a lot of work and they do buy their mats and frames in bulk, but then you are talking dozens or even hundreds of units.

Are there other purchases that might need to be made? Ongoing printer maintenance costs?

Obviously framing can be as complicated and expensive as you want, but the printing itself is pretty straightforward. You will need a layout table and a square and knife to trim prints (a cutting mat is also nice to have.) You might have to get a glass cutter and learn how to use it. The print heads sometimes do get clogged beyond repair, but I wouldn't worry about that with the Canon. I've had mine for several years and made hundreds of prints without problems.


When I browse forums, comments, and online articles about printing, people seem to fixate on the cost of the ink alone as well as perhaps the printing heads ( for good reason on both accounts! ) - which taken into account on their own might make the venture prohibitive or justifiable; but with framing and other hardware costs on top it soon becomes harder to talk myself into even considering it.
If you can keep it simple it is doable, although I think you are on the low end of usage to make it practical. If you can envision other uses for the printer (posters, children's art projects, scanned newspapers, even gift-wrap) it might be a more attractive proposition. When I worked in the lab I had print heads that needed replacement, but that was after many thousands of prints.

A few pointers on printing and framing: I have found that you need to increase the saturation of an image before you print it, the reflected light in the print will never be as vibrant as the direct light from the screen. You should also check your histogram before printing to make sure that your blacks are black (0,0,0) and your whites are white (255, 255, 255) unless it is a low contrast image. Let your prints air-dry for at least a day before putting them behind glass, they will out-gas and cause a film to form on the glass (a film that can be easily cleaned, but then you'd have to re-frame it.)

A few final words: High-end photo printing is an esoteric and complicated subject, one that is subject to the laws of diminishing returns. To get that extra few % of "quality" you might have to spend double, triple or even more on set-up, calibration and materials. For us mere mortals, it usually isn't worth it. Probably the best way to get started is to find someone with a simple home set-up that works well and go through the process with them on one of your images worked up from scratch and then duplicate their set-up.



A sample cost breakdown (in USD):

Canon Pro-100 (after rebates or bought new from someone who got it with a camera package) $150
Additional set of Inks: $120
Additional inks as needed: $80
200 sheets premium luster paper: $150
Total cost for 200 13x19 prints: $500
Price per print: $2.50

Obviously I can't give you the actual cost where you live, but this is what I've invested in my set up. Some ink costs will be less when printing newspapers or line art, where you only have black and white with a mostly white area.

If you have a quality all-in-one (printer/scanner/copier) and can make good photo prints on that (with photo paper) you should be able to do the same on a bigger printer.






Last edited by Cipher; 08-09-2018 at 07:16 AM. Reason: typo, info
08-09-2018, 07:13 AM   #9
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Storage costs and space also come into play:

• storage space for unused boxes of inkjet paper(s);
• storage for finished prints not in frames (including polyester sheets placed between prints or polypropylene envelopes (for examples)—especially if you choose a mat surface—so the back of the print touching the surface of the print doesn't abrade the surface);
• storage for framed prints in between exhibitions or display that are not on your walls. My dining room has a dozen large boxes, each with its own framed print, from my exhibition two years ago. I've entered prints into juried exhibitions, so after each those I have one to three more framed prints to store. I live in a townhouse, so it's not best suited for these purposes.

Many of these printers are large, so you'll need a separate stand for one and you might need to purchase a sturdy piece of furniture for that.

Some printers are good about occasional sporadic use without clogging, like the Epson 3880, while others notoriously clog without regular use, like the Epson 4800 or 4900.

I use a monitor calibration tool for printing, and while not essential, it did make printing more consistent and easier to make adjustments while working on an image when printing it for the first time.

If you have hairy pets, you'll need a brush to run across the surface of paper before placing it in the printer. I've lost my fair share of prints where the ink didn't get on the paper caused by an errant dog hair. A brush isn't expensive, yet it saves the cost of lost ink and paper on a useless print.

That's what comes to mind for me!

---------- Post added 08-09-18 at 10:14 AM ----------

Storage costs and space also come into play:

• storage space for unused boxes of inkjet paper(s);
• storage for finished prints not in frames (including polyester sheets placed between prints or polypropylene envelopes (for examples)—especially if you choose a mat surface—so the back of the print touching the surface of the print doesn't abrade the surface);
• storage for framed prints in between exhibitions or display that are not on your walls. My dining room has a dozen large boxes, each with its own framed print, from my exhibition two years ago. I've entered prints into juried exhibitions, so after each those I have one to three more framed prints to store. I live in a townhouse, so it's not best suited for these purposes.

Many of these printers are large, so you'll need a separate stand for one and you might need to purchase a sturdy piece of furniture for that.

Some printers are good about occasional sporadic use without clogging, like the Epson 3880, while others notoriously clog without regular use, like the Epson 4800 or 4900.

I use a monitor calibration tool for printing, and while not essential, it did make printing more consistent and easier to make adjustments while working on an image when printing it for the first time.

If you have hairy pets, you'll need a brush to run across the surface of paper before placing it in the printer. I've lost my fair share of prints where the ink didn't get on the paper caused by an errant dog hair. A brush isn't expensive, yet it saves the cost of lost ink and paper on a useless print.

That's what comes to mind for me!
08-09-2018, 09:01 AM   #10
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I use epson w/ dye not pigment (6 set Clara) and:
-- I have no trouble w/ clogging so far (10 years use, often a month or two between printing)
-- color fastness is fine (does 100 vs 200 years matter?)
-- appearance is as good as high end pigment inks for matte--where I use it for tests to compare to larger print results where I want bigger prints. I have heard the glossy results are even better for dye vs pigment, but I have not done any A to B comparison.

The Epson 1430 will do 13x19 and it allows user input for any size paper up to the 13 " by something quite long (maybe 144"). I don't have the 1430--I have a 10 year old all in one, that only accepts 8.5" wide), but the inks are the same.

BTW accumulate a few images to print and then print narrow slices of each on the same paper as test to get the image right for the final print. I don't use calibrated screen and anyway the print works by reflected light, versus the transmitted light for the screen, so some trial and error is often called for IMO (including deciding what paper to use).
08-09-2018, 09:46 AM - 1 Like   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Focusrite Quote
I had a photo book printed by an online company last year, and although it was described as "premium" paper and printing, I was left rather disappointed at the colour and lack of fine detail in the printing; but beyond that I was thrilled to simply have a book with my name on it to flip through!

I'm curious about the cost of all the other unknown extras that I may need to make it worth any time and effort: this would include the obvious expenses - such as initial cost of the printer and the cost of paper - and on top of that any other bits and pieces required.

Such as: Is a monitor calibrating tool essential? Would I need to upgrade any software for best results? ( I only have Lightroom 5 at the moment ) How would you normally mount your photos? What kind of frame would you typically use? Would you use the high-clarity glass to mount it behind? Would you buy the frames in bulk? Are there other purchases that might need to be made? Ongoing printer maintenance costs?

I recently passed through a I-want-Medium-Format phase as well ( with wallet unscathed ), so feel free to talk me out of this one!
You have enough questions here to cover about a dozen individual threads, but here's my perspective:
a) Photo Books: Not all printers are the same. My favorite is Blurb, but they have three levels of paper quality. The highest quality is very expensive, so my last book I compromised with their mid-grade...and was disappointed. If you really care about image quality, you have to go with the top of the line papers and pay for it.

b) If you lived in a big city (think Sydney), you could probably find a digital printer that you could visit to work out the color and density profiles to satisfy your expectations. It would be at a 'custom price'. Many top photographers who don't have the time or interest in printing themselves, will make a special trip to the printer to set up that relationship....so that might mean a one time trip to Sydney or Hong Kong or Los Angeles, etc.

c) I am very picky and I want and enjoy as much control as possible, so I do print my own color and B&W images, mount and mat and frame them. The initial cost is not cheap. I have used Epson printers since the dawn of inkjets and currently use an Epson SureColor P800. I've tested dozens of different papers, but have found that most the time, Epson paper works best with Epson inks. With an iMac and Adobe LR or PS, I INITIALLY spend a few hours tweaking the print settings until I am satisfied. I take screenshots of every setting to ensure it's all correct before printing. I have used a Spyder color calibration tool in the past, but found it unnecessary with an iMac and Epson printers with the profiles they've already created.

d) I use a 40" Logan mat cutter and love it. Again, not cheap and you will want to buy lots of spare blades. 32x40" white foam and mat boards in cartons of 25-50 take up space, but per print makes things profitable. You will need at least twice the material for what you need due to learning mistakes.

e) For frames, there are two approaches. Either I find pre-made ones that are relatively cheap at IKEA or I will custom order the frames online from someplace like Contemporary Frame Co
Great selection and prices, pricey shipping costs, but it's worth it if you need at least a dozen frames.

f) Glass. I'd find a local glazier or glass-cutter and use the least expensive glass he or she would recommend...unless the gallery or the buyer specifically want non-glare or UV-protecting glass. I've found that untreated glass still blocks 75% of UVA and 99% of UVB, and that UV treated glass does not block 100% of the UV and just encourages people to mount their images where sun will hit it and fade the image.

g) Medium format: Sorry I am not going to help here. When I went from 35mm film to 645 MF, I never went back to 35mm. When I went from APS-C digital to FF, I never went back. When and if I ever hang up my 645 film camera, that will probably be when I go to 645 digital.

Summary: It all comes down to deciding which rabbit hole to go down.
a) Save space, time, and overall cost and send out all your images for printing, mat, mount, framing, but live with the compromise that the finished product was out of your hands.
b) Dedicate space, time, and cost in DIY with the satisfaction that any compromise was your own.

Most pros go with "a" because they want and need time to shoot and not process. But for me, once I worked in a wet photo lab and once I learned Photoshop, my personality couldn't let it go when I knew with a bit of effort, I could do better. But it's a rabbit hole and if you know you're someone that doesn't stick with things, then avoid wonderland.
08-09-2018, 04:48 PM   #12
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I had terrible experience with online photo labs (shuttefly, national photo lab etc) - smaller 8x10 prints came back ok, the photo books were pretty low quality, but the large framed prints I sent them came back looking terrible. I've since switched to a real printer in Vermont, he's doing tremendous job with my photos, very high quality work, and price is very reasonable. Plus, a personal approach to customers, you can always email him and ask how the project is going, ask for some specific calibrating on some images, or just ask for advice
08-09-2018, 07:05 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by calsan Quote
Without answering all your questions, I can recommend this system to deal with the cost of doing lots of prints with an inkjet -
Rihac Continuous Ink Supply Systems, CISS, Printer refills Ink & Cartridges
I use a Rhiac 'CISS' system with my Epson Workforce, with the Photo Pro Pigment Inks. A small amount of technical skill and care needed to set it up and you really should follow the instructions to the letter. Delivers HUGE cost saving compared to the tiny OEM cartridge inks and quality is the same as the OEM inks too.
I have both an Epson Workforce-7110 and a Canon Pixma Pro 100 . There is a massive difference in photo quality between the two. The former is not professional quality, while the later is.

I use Precision Color inks instead of Canon inks to save costs.
08-09-2018, 08:20 PM   #14
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CISS for CANON PIXMA PRO Series
The OP question was about reducing printing costs, so using a CISS ink system was my suggestion.
08-09-2018, 09:08 PM   #15
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Thank you everyone for your replies! I love this forum, seriously!

QuoteOriginally posted by Mot11 Quote
Red River Paper has costed the price of just the print for a number of printers at Cost of Inkjet Printing Reports by Red River Paper.
The system they used was pretty thorough, and the pricing is very similar to figures quoted elsewhere. It's all relatively consistent, and very handy for calculating long-term costs.

QuoteOriginally posted by Cipher Quote
A sample cost breakdown (in USD):

Canon Pro-100 (after rebates or bought new from someone who got it with a camera package) $150
Additional set of Inks: $120
Additional inks as needed: $80
200 sheets premium luster paper: $150
Total cost for 200 13x19 prints: $500
Price per print: $2.50
Thanks for the detailed reply as well as the pricing breakdown: this covers a lot of what I was curious about!

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Glass. I'd find a local glazier or glass-cutter
This is a good thought; I might browse what's on offer locally to see what might be available, along with prices.

QuoteOriginally posted by mattt Quote
Buying paper in bulk means I have $ tied up in future images not yet sold.
QuoteOriginally posted by EssJayEff Quote
• storage space for unused boxes of inkjet paper(s);
• storage for finished prints not in frames (including polyester sheets placed between prints or polypropylene envelopes (for examples)—especially if you choose a mat surface—so the back of the print touching the surface of the print doesn't abrade the surface);
• storage for framed prints in between exhibitions or display that are not on your walls.
Storage of non-mounted or framed prints was something I was pondering, and I was curious about how to store them without abrading the surface or using too much space in the process. And yeah, the initial outlay on consumables is what I was primarily considering, but thinking about not only the initial cost but the storage and potential wastage of consumables through unuse was something I hadn't thought much about - especially having money tied up in the paper. Thanks for mentioning that!

QuoteOriginally posted by Alex645 Quote
Summary: It all comes down to deciding which rabbit hole to go down.
a) Save space, time, and overall cost and send out all your images for printing, mat, mount, framing, but live with the compromise that the finished product was out of your hands.
b) Dedicate space, time, and cost in DIY with the satisfaction that any compromise was your own.
QuoteOriginally posted by mattt Quote
The novelty of printing a few images to rotate through a half dozen frames doesn’t justify the cash outlay.
QuoteOriginally posted by Cipher Quote
If you can keep it simple it is doable, although I think you are on the low end of usage to make it practical.
I think that all settles it - I'll let it go for the moment. For all the initial outlay I could probably do something else much more profitable with my time. I might hunt around for either a local small printing business or another enthusiast who might have a printer and commission a couple of prints to see if they turn out like I'd hope.

I'm still musing over my attraction to the idea, and I think the word "novelty" neatly sums up a part of it - a want rather than a need that will likely dissipate in time, or at least mature in my perspective of its importance ( or lack thereof ). Perhaps it's also the desire of wanting to have full control from start to finish, however I don't know how many music composers pick up a baton to lead an orchestra with their own composition rather than sit down to write another masterpiece. A bit of a sentimental thought, and perhaps a poor metaphor ( probably quite a few do! ); but I'd probably be better off going out and shooting more photos.

Thanks again to everyone who took time to read and respond!

QuoteOriginally posted by mattt Quote
Printing at home will spend the money you could be investing in MF glass
Can't fault that logic!!
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