Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-16-2019, 02:56 PM   #1
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2019
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 523
Paper recommendations

Not top range, my printer is an Epson xp860, which I have to say isn't bad but it's a consumer range printer, however it's capable up to A4 and in many ways better than a lot of cheap lab processing and even some old darkroom prints.

I generally just print gloss on Epson papers and inks but I was looking or a matt or a pearl paper for a slightly softer look for some wedding pictures I'm printing. Epson do a matt but I could do with some personal experience on this. i won't be printing beyond 9x6/10x8?

03-16-2019, 03:24 PM - 1 Like   #2
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Sunny Dun(ny)fermline, Fife
Posts: 404
Like you I tend to print on Glossy. I also have an Epson printer and I use the Ilford Galerie paper which gives really good results. I'll state now that I have no experience with their pearl version but the reviews on Amazon Ilford Galerie Prestige Smooth Pearl A4 25 sheets: Amazon.co.uk: Amazon.co.uk: seems to suggest that this is every bit as good as their glossy paper
03-16-2019, 06:21 PM - 1 Like   #3
Senior Member




Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 204
Another vote here for Ilford Smooth Pearl. I have used it for years. The Ilford is also nice heavy paper for 4x6 prints. For glossy, I still use Epson. The Epson luster is also nice; a bit brighter that the Ilford but thinner paper stock.
03-16-2019, 11:09 PM - 1 Like   #4
dms
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,124
I use Epson’s ultra premium Luster, premium presentation matte (it used to be called heavy weight matte), and premuim presentation glossy. Roughly 70% matte, 25% luster, and 5% glossy.

On my printer (which also uses Clara inks), I found the Illford pearl resulted in poor colors using the stock Epson printer profiles, and letting photoshop pick the colors.

On the other hand my results w/ Epson matte paper mentioned above, matched the high end (large roll paper) epson printers. (I used my printer to check/proof when printing very large.) And I find the above mentioned Epson luster paper to also be very good, although I never did a match versus high end epson printers.

03-16-2019, 11:11 PM - 1 Like   #5
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter




Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Tumbleweed, Arizona
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 5,594
I've considered from time to time trying to print my own. I've read a bit - but on to your question. All the paper manufacturers offer sample packs. I've found a couple from ILFORD
Here is a link to a retailer that offers a number of sample packs across several paper vendors.
03-16-2019, 11:17 PM   #6
dms
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,124
By the way, if you want a softer look I suggest using matte and not the luster (as regards Epson paper). To my eyes the Epson luster has the bright look of gloss, w/o the reflections, and with better handling (finger prints etc. not showing). But not the soft arty look of the matte.
03-17-2019, 02:17 AM   #7
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2019
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 523
Original Poster
"On my printer (which also uses Clara inks), I found the Illford pearl resulted in poor colors using the stock Epson printer profiles, and letting photoshop pick the colors."

That's the kind of thing I was wondering about. Currently everything is in balance. I fancy the Ilford papers but I don't have time to sort out profiling before this job.

The Matt Epson paper sounds like what I need so I'll purchase that and look out for some trial packs of the Ilford to try out.

03-17-2019, 06:58 AM   #8
Senior Member




Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 219
Red River has some sample packs of paper you can try inexpensively. About $13 for 14 sheet with free shipping -- Inkjet Sample Kits - Red River Inkjet Paper

Sorry, missed the location, but perhaps others may fine it useful.
03-31-2019, 06:03 AM   #9
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2019
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 523
Original Poster
Just thought I'd post a quick comparison of the papers I've got. This is only taken with the phone but hopefully you can see the difference





Top right is a glossy paper called Olmec. Definite green tinge to that. Bottom right is Epson Matt. Also a slight green tinge but acceptable. I don't think the subject suits it this time but portraits do. On the left is Epson glossy which has a slight Magenta tinge which slowly fades over time. The magenta tinge looks a lot more obvious on this picture than in real life.

I'm going to pick up some Ilford stuff and compare that.

Last edited by 3by2; 05-01-2019 at 02:26 PM.
03-31-2019, 08:36 AM   #10
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Sunny Dun(ny)fermline, Fife
Posts: 404
I'm not sure if it's my laptop but I can't see your picture.

It's showing up now

Last edited by Johndav; 04-01-2019 at 01:38 PM.
03-31-2019, 03:08 PM   #11
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2019
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 523
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Johndav Quote
I'm not sure if it's my laptop but I can't see your picture
Ahh, probably because it's from my Google photos. I haven't quite figured out how that works on this forum but obviously it doesn't always. Put it in as an attachment.
03-31-2019, 10:15 PM   #12
PDL
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: PNW USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,070
For all of you printers out there:

Are you using a calibrated monitor and paper profiles? I have a ColorMunki Photo that allows me to build my own paper profiles for color and B&W for any give paper. Works really well.
04-01-2019, 07:07 AM   #13
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2019
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 523
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by PDL Quote
For all of you printers out there:

Are you using a calibrated monitor and paper profiles? I have a ColorMunki Photo that allows me to build my own paper profiles for color and B&W for any give paper. Works really well.
Interesting question. No to either, although I'm probably in the minority. I use only the windows monitor calibration tool and either a paper icc profile or a the lightroom/printer default. In addition I calibrate myself occasionally

Munsell Hue Test

If what I print looks like it does on the monitor and it generally does, I'm happy with that. So far I've not felt the need to invest in a spyder or other. I'm not using the best monitor or graphics card either. In fact I'm still using an old graphics card because I like the way it looks and represents things. I've tried other graphics cards and gone back to it even though all the benchmark tests say it's rubbish. It may be performance wise but for photography it works well.

I think I've just been lucky to hit on the right combo and if I change any of it I might need to invest in some calibration equipment.
04-01-2019, 01:06 PM - 1 Like   #14
PDL
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: PNW USA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,070
My background in color printing comes from the film days. See this entry.
[Printing] Setting up a color darkroom? - PentaxForums.com

I use the same philosophy when printing digital images. I must caution, that the human perception of colors is extremely variable due to this several pounds of protein sitting behind our optical sensors. This mass of protein will modify what appears to be "great color" based on its previous experience, i.e. the human Mark I eyeball can not really be trusted to produce consistent interpretations of color across various media. That is why I always suggest that people use reliable instruments to calibrate monitors. Most color paper manufactures supply icc or icm profiles that when used in conjunction with calibrated monitors will produce accurate colors across media. It is important to remember that monitors are their own supply of light - otherwise they would not be monitors - paper works on reflected light from the underlying white ahh...… paper. The color temperature and appearance of the image will vary greatly depending upon the light source. The use of monitor calibration tools and paying attention to color profiles will help in minimizing those differences.

If you are happy with the output of your printed images, then so be it. Pick the paper/ink combinations that fit what you want. What drives my choice is price, surface and longevity. When I print an image I want it to reflect what the scene looked like and will last for a long time. I have used outside printers (Costco) and they were using Fuji Archive paper so it will last a long time. My old cheap HP inkjet printer produced mediocre images but so far they have not faded to a substantial degree. My brand spanking new Epson XP-15000 is going to put me in the poor house because it blows through expensive ink like you would not believe. However, the images, on Kodak Premium Glossy paper are really nice. I bought some generic Staples Matte paper and they appear to be working out well also, the only thing I can't get good information on is information on the stability of the paper in the long term.

Just be careful when you are "comparing" between what you think is OK on the monitor and your resulting prints. Wait a while and look at the prints under different lighting conditions and then make your judgements.
04-01-2019, 01:57 PM   #15
Pentaxian




Join Date: Feb 2019
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 523
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by PDL Quote
My background in color printing comes from the film days. See this entry.
[Printing] Setting up a color darkroom? - PentaxForums.com

I use the same philosophy when printing digital images. I must caution, that the human perception of colors is extremely variable due to this several pounds of protein sitting behind our optical sensors. This mass of protein will modify what appears to be "great color" based on its previous experience, i.e. the human Mark I eyeball can not really be trusted to produce consistent interpretations of color across various media. That is why I always suggest that people use reliable instruments to calibrate monitors. Most color paper manufactures supply icc or icm profiles that when used in conjunction with calibrated monitors will produce accurate colors across media. It is important to remember that monitors are their own supply of light - otherwise they would not be monitors - paper works on reflected light from the underlying white ahh...… paper. The color temperature and appearance of the image will vary greatly depending upon the light source. The use of monitor calibration tools and paying attention to color profiles will help in minimizing those differences.

If you are happy with the output of your printed images, then so be it. Pick the paper/ink combinations that fit what you want. What drives my choice is price, surface and longevity. When I print an image I want it to reflect what the scene looked like and will last for a long time. I have used outside printers (Costco) and they were using Fuji Archive paper so it will last a long time. My old cheap HP inkjet printer produced mediocre images but so far they have not faded to a substantial degree. My brand spanking new Epson XP-15000 is going to put me in the poor house because it blows through expensive ink like you would not believe. However, the images, on Kodak Premium Glossy paper are really nice. I bought some generic Staples Matte paper and they appear to be working out well also, the only thing I can't get good information on is information on the stability of the paper in the long term.

Just be careful when you are "comparing" between what you think is OK on the monitor and your resulting prints. Wait a while and look at the prints under different lighting conditions and then make your judgements.
Sound advice. I too come from a film background and used to do all my own developing and printing. I even have a qualification called a City and Guilds in General photography, However that was of no help at all when I bought my first serious digital slr and a computer and printer. I was entirely bemused by colour spaces, profiles, pixels and the myriad of other terms used in digital. Luckily I now have a working knowledge. To this day, it still astonishes me what can be done compared to film.

I would love to do things a little better and explore the potential of better printers, profiling and papers and inks but ultimately I cannot justify it. It's not the only hobby I have, so I must compromise and experiment and am fully aware that it may fall over outside of the boundaries I've set myself. Still, as prices come down relatively, I'm able to justify things I wouldn't have in the past so perhaps a calibration tool and a decent printer may enter the house one day.

---------- Post added 04-01-19 at 02:09 PM ----------

Having said all that, I didn't realize the colormunki photo was so cheap now! I'm damn sure the last time I looked at that kind of stuff it was triple today's price......hmmmm.....
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
color, day, epson, film, images, light, matt, monitors, paper, photography, photoshop, printer, profiles, range, time
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Canon Pixma Pro 100 Printer + Paper: Only $79! Adam Pentax Price Watch 10 08-09-2017 03:52 AM
Recommendations a mid-weight PK paper for an exhibition frogoutofwater Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 9 05-04-2016 05:41 AM
Need advice. Canon Pixma Pro-100 printer and paper recommendations ap_exclamationpoint Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 7 12-11-2013 09:36 AM
Epson Ultra Premium Photo Paper Luster and Premium Photo Paper Glossy compared bwDraco Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 5 04-24-2013 02:52 AM
wide format photo paper?! justDIY Digital Processing, Software, and Printing 13 04-21-2010 05:50 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:07 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top