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01-15-2021, 11:01 PM   #1
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Using Monitor Calibration profile on Mac

I have recently purchased a photo editing monitor (BenQ SW270C), which comes factory calibrated with an individual factory calibration report. I use it with a MacBook Pro connected via USB-C. Despite the factory calibration, individual calibration is recommended (different computer, video card, light levels etc). I have successfully calibrated it using a SpyderX Pro, and constructed a profile using BenQ's supplied Palette Master Element V1.3.13 software. [The parameters of the calibration I selected were D65 white point, Panel Native RGB, Luminance 120, Gamma 2.2, Blackpoint 0.1 nits, Profile 16 bit LUTs, Patch set Large.]

The calibration profile (.icc file) was auto-installed on the mac by Palette Master Element, and is accessible through the Display preferences. It is also selectable in the monitor via buttons on the front (installed as a menu option by Palette Master Element).

My question then is: Should I specify the profile via the mac display preferences, or via the monitor menu, or both? Setting the monitor Adobe RGB and the mac to "BenQ SW270C" (presumably the factory calibration) for example gives a very saturated image. If I set either the monitor or the mac display preference to the new calibration, I get a much less saturated result. Setting both to the calibration gives a rather dull unsaturated product, as though the calibration is being applied twice, multiplicatively. This is why I am unsure of the correct procedure.

This is my first serious calibration. I apologise if I am missing the obvious.

01-16-2021, 10:38 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Paul the Sunman Quote
This is my first serious calibration. I apologise if I am missing the obvious.
Without having your kit in front of me, it is hard to say, but my understanding is that the SpyderX is used to create an ICC profile for the monitor set as you intend to use it. As such, I would do the SpyderX calibration on the monitor set to its factory defaults and use the SpyderX software to generate the ICC profile for use by the operating system, leaving the monitor menu settings as they were.


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01-16-2021, 12:10 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by Paul the Sunman Quote
This is why I am unsure of the correct procedure.
I use neither Macbook pro nor a BenQ monitor. But when I calibrate my Eizo screen with the supplied software on a windows 10 desktop, it creates the .icc file n the windows OS correctly, and the monitor controls (on the monitor itself) also confirm that is the one it is using.

You say you are seeing saturation differences, but what software are you using to assess the "saturation"? Are these software programs colour -managed and set up correctly ?
01-16-2021, 04:19 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Paul the Sunman Quote
I have recently purchased a photo editing monitor (BenQ SW270C), which comes factory calibrated with an individual factory calibration report. I use it with a MacBook Pro connected via USB-C. Despite the factory calibration, individual calibration is recommended (different computer, video card, light levels etc). I have successfully calibrated it using a SpyderX Pro, and constructed a profile using BenQ's supplied Palette Master Element V1.3.13 software. [The parameters of the calibration I selected were D65 white point, Panel Native RGB, Luminance 120, Gamma 2.2, Blackpoint 0.1 nits, Profile 16 bit LUTs, Patch set Large.
The factory calibration report while in some ways useful is not of any real help with the business of calibrating and profiling as you are in control of aim points.

In your case it looks like you have selected good starting points, D65 normally recommended for todays panels, although you may need to change or add to this if you are considering editng for printing and aiming to try and match screen to print. Gamma 2.2 is correct for todays displays. Luminance of 120 cd/m2 may or may not be correct as this will depend on your viewing ambient light and will most likely change if you are wanting to print as above. In that case your Luminence and Blackpoint will ideally need to be dropped to match print contrast - currently you are at a contrast ratio of 1200:1 whereas for print you will probably need to adjust to 300:1 or less to match the papers dynamic range.

QuoteQuote:
My question then is: Should I specify the profile via the mac display preferences, or via the monitor menu, or both? Setting the monitor Adobe RGB and the mac to "BenQ SW270C" (presumably the factory calibration) for example gives a very saturated image. If I set either the monitor or the mac display preference to the new calibration, I get a much less saturated result. Setting both to the calibration gives a rather dull unsaturated product, as though the calibration is being applied twice, multiplicatively. This is why I am unsure of the correct procedure.

This is my first serious calibration. I apologise if I am missing the obvious.
I am not familiar with the Mac OS (or for that matter the BenQ) but the monitor profile you created will be placed where it needs to be and be used by the Mac and colour savvy applications.

You should not set the monitor to Adobe RGB or any other flavour as you will be overidding your newly created monitor profile which has been set by you to Panel Native RGB (This may well exceed Adobe RGB in certain areas) this is the calibration you need to use for accuracy.

Your Mac must be set to use the ICC profile you produced in calibration. I think that this should have happened automatically when you produced your profile

AFAIK your BenQ Palette software is able to produce a selection of profiles for different needs and will apply them automatically as you need them. - software switch or the little puck that some BenQ have?

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