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6 Days Ago - 1 Like   #1
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backlight on glass prints?

I have an idea but don't want to spend $50 on a glass print plus other supplies to test it. Since I haven't ordered any glass prints, I don't know what to expect.

So, my idea is to order a glass print of the photo below. Then build a box to hold the print and add something like a LED rope light along the skyline to light up the sunset. Maybe cut some masking to keep the light from bleeding through into the bottom part. I have a few ideas how to light it but don't know if glass print allow for light to come through. I've seen some mention adhesive backing which obviously wouldn't work. For now, I'm looking at FractureMe.com but am open to suggestions (US based companies - don't care to wait for oversea delivery).


Kentucky lake | Shortly after sunset on Kentucky lake | jaster131 | Flickr


6 Days Ago   #2
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That method works a treat for Galle and other art nouveau vases. it should work for your lovely photo too.

Please let us know it turns out
6 Days Ago - 1 Like   #3
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I haven't tried this, but maybe a similar alternative to consider over glass?

6 Days Ago   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mooncatt Quote
I haven't tried this, but maybe a similar alternative to consider over glass?

https://youtu.be/nxYyKaPjyP8
Thanks, that's a possibility I'll have to look into.

6 Days Ago   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by Mooncatt Quote
I haven't tried this, but maybe a similar alternative to consider over glass
Now I'm glad I've not managed to get around to getting any of my astro shots printed. I have thought of getting some done on aluminum but I think this would provide much better results. I do wonder how big of a print would work as I would love a 2'x3' print of M42 shot with almost 9 hours of exposure. I'm going to steal that link and go and post it over in the astro group as they would probably like it too.
6 Days Ago   #6
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Will you need some sort of diffusion to scatter the light and keep from getting "hot spots" on the image?
6 Days Ago   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by jspi Quote
I have an idea but don't want to spend $50 on a glass print plus other supplies to test it. Since I haven't ordered any glass prints, I don't know what to expect.

So, my idea is to order a glass print of the photo below. Then build a box to hold the print and add something like a LED rope light along the skyline to light up the sunset. Maybe cut some masking to keep the light from bleeding through into the bottom part. I have a few ideas how to light it but don't know if glass print allow for light to come through. I've seen some mention adhesive backing which obviously wouldn't work. For now, I'm looking at FractureMe.com but am open to suggestions (US based companies - don't care to wait for oversea delivery).


Kentucky lake | Shortly after sunset on Kentucky lake | jaster131 | Flickr
I suspect it will come down to the opacity of the inks. Would be fun to experiment, for sure.

6 Days Ago - 1 Like   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by AggieDad Quote
Will you need some sort of diffusion to scatter the light and keep from getting "hot spots" on the image?
Possibly, that will depend on the LED strips I'm able to get. Might need to point the light away from the glass and have it reflect off some aluminum foil or reflector tape. The video just wrapped LEDs around the frame and that seemed to work for the astro photos (there was frosted plexiglass between the lights & film). That would probably work for mine but I'm wanting to light the sky without lighting the lake. Specifically light the sunset colors. Light bleed will happen and that's fine but I'm hoping to accent the sunset... Just like real life. Probably won't work like I want but could turn out nice anyway.

---------- Post added 09-20-22 at 10:28 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by MarkJerling Quote
I suspect it will come down to the opacity of the inks. Would be fun to experiment, for sure.
Right, that's why I was asking. Didn't know if I was the only one who thought of this (obviously not considering the link posted earlier). I just didn't know if glass prints typically had some backing that would prevent back lighting. Something like a mirror finish to reflect room light back through the glass? Or if the inks were typically too opaque to pass back lights. Without having a glass print to exam, I'm making a lot of assumptions...
6 Days Ago   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by jspi Quote
I have an idea but don't want to spend $50 on a glass print plus other supplies to test it. Since I haven't ordered any glass prints, I don't know what to expect.
Talk to whoever you plan to use to make the print, most of what you see/hear about are not made for back lighting. Who ever is making the print for you will have a better idea of the amount of light needed. The flat led strips would generally produce a better quality light than most of the rope products. A simple plan is to use a deep frame with a spacer and frosted Mylar or acrylic to diffuse. Dimmers can be a big help.
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For backlit displaying images, unless large size is must have (from a K20D), I'd use a monitor, electronic frame, fitted into a wood frame, since it's already back-lit, brightness can be adjusted, photo can be changed at wish, so once the display is in place, there is no additional cost for displaying another picture.
The reason my comment is so weird is because I print on paper especially to avoid the backlit rending of computer displays that is now the dominant form of image display, I want to show images front lit, like they are in real life.
One more thing, the image above is underexposed as the right half side of the histogram is empty, so I would start by pulling up the tone curve (on the raw file to avoid color banding), before displaying the image.
6 Days Ago   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by biz-engineer Quote
For backlit displaying images, unless large size is must have (from a K20D), I'd use a monitor, electronic frame, fitted into a wood frame, since it's already back-lit, brightness can be adjusted, photo can be changed at wish, so once the display is in place, there is no additional cost for displaying another picture.
I brought this up in the comments to the video I linked earlier, because I had the same thoughts. The answers I got suggested that those digital photo frames may not display the colors accurately and you will lose a lot of contrast. I still wouldn't dismiss the idea out of hand, but there are considerations to keep in mind.
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Seems to me the image being discussed at the top of the post is (was), in real life, backlit. Having printed several thousands of Duratrans and Ilfochomes in the past I'm saddened to find out I was actively profiting off of being a surrealist; my Dog man, what could I have been thinking? ) Perhaps the E-ink Gallery 3 would be most real.
4 Days Ago   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by biz-engineer Quote
For backlit displaying images, unless large size is must have (from a K20D), I'd use a monitor, electronic frame, fitted into a wood frame, since it's already back-lit, brightness can be adjusted, photo can be changed at wish, so once the display is in place, there is no additional cost for displaying another picture.
The reason my comment is so weird is because I print on paper especially to avoid the backlit rending of computer displays that is now the dominant form of image display, I want to show images front lit, like they are in real life.
One more thing, the image above is underexposed as the right half side of the histogram is empty, so I would start by pulling up the tone curve (on the raw file to avoid color banding), before displaying the image.
I did pull the JPG into RawTherapee and adjust the exposure which makes it better (thanks for the suggestion - it's an old photo I haven't looked at in a while). The photo taken when I thought RAW was complicated and beyond my abilities (soon learned it wasn't as hard as I thought).

Typically, I print on paper. For this particular image, I'd like to print on glass, or similar material, and make the sunset glow to make it look more realistic. It probably won't look as good as I imagine in my head but it'll be a fun project if I go through with it. The concept should look nice for specific photos, not as a general display technique.
4 Days Ago   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by jspi Quote
The concept should look nice for specific photos, not as a general display technique.
As I can see with one of the photo labs I use, they have multiple options for prints on acrylic glass (plexiglass), depending if you want the print to be in front of the glass or at the back of the glass, and if you want the print to be the used with back lighting, ambient light, or both. There is a light diffusing layer, so in all cases you only need to add light at the back. Best is too look at available options from your lab.
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