Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-13-2011, 09:43 PM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: new york
Posts: 3
Grainy picture? help!

Hey I'm new here, so first i wanna say hi I'm Dave. I'm trying to take a picture to have as a backdrop for my website but every time it comes out grainy, i'm new to this and have done a little research into ISO's. mine was on auto which i think was 3200.

here is the pic Name:  IMGP1348.jpg
Views: 1630
Size:  146.8 KB

06-13-2011, 10:57 PM   #2
Veteran Member
NicoleAu's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Central Coast, NSW, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 539
I don't know what camera you have but on mine, it comes out too noisy at that ISO. Try dialing it down a bit
06-13-2011, 11:23 PM   #3
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: new york
Posts: 3
Original Poster
hey i have a Pentax K-X
06-13-2011, 11:29 PM   #4
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 493
Your ISO is too high. Set the camera on a tripod and drop the ISO to 200 or 400. That should provide you with a less gariny picture.

regards

Chris

06-13-2011, 11:31 PM   #5
Veteran Member
NicoleAu's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Central Coast, NSW, Australia
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 539
Ah ok, same as mine then. The highest I like to push mine at is 800 for night shots. For portrait shots I prefer to keep under 200 if I can. Others may differ.
06-14-2011, 12:23 AM   #6
hcc
Pentaxian
hcc's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,537
There is a simple way to reduce the grainy appearance with high ISO without changing your technique: use a noise reduction software for PP. There are some excellent dedicated NR softwares. I use Noiseware (you can instal it free), there is Noiseninja and a few others.

Give it a try for your existing shots.

However the earlier posts provided good advice to lower manually the ISO, and this is also good advice for future shots..
06-14-2011, 12:47 AM   #7
Pentaxian
newmikey's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,598
QuoteOriginally posted by dave.f.w Quote
...i'm new to this and have done a little research into ISO's. mine was on auto which i think was 3200.
This should be an excellent resource: What is ISO on your digital camera, how to use ISO settings

Quoting the pay-off of the article: "If you set your digital camera to a low ISO, for example 100, the resulting photograph will be better quality than one set at 1600. The higher the ISO the more grainy the photo will look. Therefore go for a low ISO number whenever possible.

However there are circumstances where a lower quality photograph is better than none at all. For example taking photographs of fish in a dark aquarium would normally be out of range for most point and shoot cameras. As you can see by the image below, setting my SLR camera to a high 1600 ISO made this task possible. Otherwise there would not have been enough light let in to the sensor and the image would have turned out totally black. "
06-14-2011, 02:40 PM   #8
New Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: new york
Posts: 3
Original Poster
Thanks guys for the quick reply's. Nice to know there's such a helpful community.

Peace

06-17-2011, 06:05 AM   #9
Pentaxian
Clicker's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 3,241
quick fix, download photoscape (free/google it) use the "editor" and choose "filter" select "noise reduction clear skin" and that should be good for now.
06-17-2011, 12:26 PM   #10
Pentaxian
Lowell Goudge's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Toronto
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 15,400
QuoteOriginally posted by dave.f.w Quote
Hey I'm new here, so first i wanna say hi I'm Dave. I'm trying to take a picture to have as a backdrop for my website but every time it comes out grainy, i'm new to this and have done a little research into ISO's. mine was on auto which i think was 3200.

here is the pic Attachment 94465
in looking at the photo, it looks like you used flash and were also using auto ISO mode.

the way pentax programs the camera, in full auto mode, it will look at focal length and set the shutter to what is reliable to hand hold, open up the aperture, then dial up the ISO until it gets either to the limit of auto iso, or until it gets correct exposure , then it will add flash for fill.

what I find much mnore reliable for flash shots, is to take all the auto crap away, shoot in manual at between 1/60 and 1/180 (basically to determine how much blending you want between natural light and flash) with the aperture set to give you the depth of field you want, and then with ISO set where you want it for grain and quality of image, let the camera adjust the flash to give correct exposure

the process is as follows.

1) set ISO manually
2) set aperture for depth of field
3) look at the exposure meter in the viewfinder and decide how much flash influence you want based upon how close to correct exposure the ISO, shutter and aperture combination you have set give you, and adjust the shutter speed as you feel to balance flash vs natural lighting.
4) take the shot and look at it. make adjustments in shutter speed to get the result you like
06-17-2011, 12:43 PM   #11
Veteran Member
magkelly's Avatar

Join Date: May 2010
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 5,905
Having used noise reduction software and having seen it overused more than I care to my suggestion is that you use the lowest iso you can that will get the job done and forget about using noise reduction software unless you absolutely have to. Noise reduction software is better than it used to be but just by using it you usually sacrifice some quality and sharpness. If you do it right it's not so bad, but it's too easy I think to overdo it and to get too dependent upon the noise reduction software for cleaning up your images to the determent of your photos.

On a plain brick wall background a little noise reduction isn't going to show as much as it would on some things so you could use a higher iso say 800 and go with that and a very light bit of noise reduction. But you start doing that all the time on portraits and they are going to look way too fake, and remember that your camera also has some noise reduction already built into it. Unless you're working with it completely off that too will help a bit with noise.

I hardly ever go above 800 iso myself. There are times when you just can't get the shot unless you do, but I actually prefer to reassess the lighting in the situation rather than go too much further up. That's me, shrug. I don't like noise but I really don't like the look of overly post processed photos either. Too much noise reduction and to me it starts to look more like a bad oil painting than a photo...
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
camera, photography, picture
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why all my pictures come out grainy? Secret Elkina Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 23 02-03-2011 05:17 AM
K-m model - grainy photos mwc Pentax DSLR Discussion 9 09-07-2010 09:28 AM
k7 Grainy noisy video matthewpent51 Video and Pentax HDSLRs 2 04-17-2010 11:57 PM
Nooby with grainy photos plucci Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 9 01-04-2010 02:35 PM
GRAINY IMAGES! Help! K20d irelandswind Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 17 07-27-2009 09:42 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:15 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top