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06-06-2008, 04:26 AM   #1
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Name this bug ...

Spotted this monster flitting round my garden yesterday evening.

It is a monster - about 3.5 inches long (9cm) with a massive wingspan. I have never seen anythink like it - this is the Southeast of England. Are we being invaded? Global warming?

Hooked my Tamron 70-300 4-5.6 (what a lens for the money, especially in the sunshine) to my K10 D (I didn't want to get too close) and ....

So what is it? Links to 100% included if more detail would help.

http://www.garypics.ukgo.com/Downloads/Gardenbug1.jpg
http://www.garypics.ukgo.com/Downloads/Gardenbug2.jpg


Last edited by ukbluetooth; 11-14-2008 at 05:40 AM.
06-06-2008, 04:27 AM   #2
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A Dragon Fly
06-06-2008, 04:49 AM   #3
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It's a dragonfly (proper spelling included), more exactly a Broad-bodied Chaser dragonfly.

Here's a link > Dragonfly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
06-06-2008, 04:57 AM   #4
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To be more precise, it's Libellula depressa (the Broadbodied chaser), and a male. The females are brown. They are common in southern England and completely harmless. Do you have a pond in the garden? The eggs are layed in water and the nymphs are aquatic (voracious predators), so expect there is water nearby.

06-06-2008, 05:27 AM   #5
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One thing to remember about dragonflies, hope my spelling is correct, is that more often than not (should I hyphenate) they will return to the same spot, time after time. So, have patience when photographing them.
06-06-2008, 07:53 AM   #6
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Original Poster
Thanks guys - As always this forum is a font of knowledge.
06-06-2008, 10:53 AM   #7
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This guide is only for N.A. but whenever I want to ID an insect I post the picture here ID Request - BugGuide.Net and I usually have an answer in a day or 2.
06-06-2008, 02:06 PM   #8
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Way to go BeerCan. I usually include BugGuide. The same author for both BugGuide and BirdSite in my signature. Mike's a great guy.

06-06-2008, 06:01 PM   #9
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His name is Bob, I believe.
06-07-2008, 05:12 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by MJB DIGITAL Quote
His name is Bob, I believe.
If you're referring to my answer, you believe wrongly.
06-08-2008, 04:03 PM   #11
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Sorry, JC, I dont know what you are talking about.

I was naming the bug. If I'm wrong...well, he must look like someone I know! 8)
06-10-2008, 05:11 AM   #12
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QuoteQuote:
The same author for both BugGuide and BirdSite in my signature. Mike's a great guy.
Thought you were referring to ^^^^^^
06-19-2008, 07:05 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Talisker Quote
. . .The eggs are layed in water and the nymphs are aquatic (voracious predators), so expect there is water nearby.
The the aquatic nymphs are also known as naiads.
06-19-2008, 08:17 PM   #14
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Here is a photo of how the nymph would look like..(though it doesnt belong to libelullidae- family of the above dragonfly)

Dragonfly Excuvae on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Just check out the jaws..it is a voracious predetor extremely effective in ambushing its prey with its expandable jaws..

Larval stage of Dragonflies can stay for 2-3 years too..esp in temperate regions..
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