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01-23-2016, 12:55 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by LeDave Quote
My worst subject to photograph is people. (Single, couples, and even groups). What can I do to better improve my ability to shoot people? Thanks.
To be honest, what I did to get over this hump was to shoot downtown Portland, Oregon on a busy day. I would stop and ask folks if they would mind if I took their photo. Before I gave them a chance to answer, I would say, "Okay, just smile" and they did smile and I got some great results. I should post them here, but they are in Black & White and would have to do some hunting to locate them. I'll keep looking. I hope this helps, as it really was the answer for me.

Thanks,

Tony

01-23-2016, 12:40 PM   #17
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When I first started working with models (cosplayers), I didn't know what I was doing. (I still don't, haha!) I had only shot rocks and trees and stuff. I'd just ask them to stand over there or whatever, they'd do their thing, and I'd take a photo. The results were something like this:



It's fine and all but nothing terribly interesting. In 7 months or so, now I'm doing things like this




QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
Develop a real rapport with your subjects, Dave, before getting the camera out, keep the rapport going until the shots have been taken.
I second this, although you can develop rapport with people during the shoot. If it's paid work (portraits for school), then you need to do it quickly, but otherwise, sometimes it will work and sometimes it will be more stiff.

The key is to get people who are patient with you for whatever reason. Perhaps some friends who always wanted to be a model on the side? There are plenty of people who like to be photographed. Find them and shoot with them. They will be patient if you are personable and enjoyable to be with.

QuoteOriginally posted by LeDave Quote
I don't know how to pose a model or a woman. I also do t know how to pose a couple. I would say posing is a major factor if my problem.
Look at what other people do. That's the biggest thing. Browse Flickr--there's TONS of model shots out there. I found inspiration from some guys from Taiwan. I just love their work (and let's face it...the girls they shoot are otherworldly pretty, so that helps) and it's really given me ideas on how to pose people.

The hardest thing I had with posing my subjects was that I didn't want to be imposing or that I was putting them in some bizarre position. Then I realized that if someone is willing to let you take her photos, she's trusting your judgment and wants to be coached and directed. "Nah, that face is a bit derpy" is often said in my sessions and it is always appreciated. Never has anyone been insulted by being told that the current pose isn't working. It can feel creepy to survey every body part and figure out where it should go and then have to say "stick your butt out a bit more." But if she's sitting for your photos, she will appreciate you making her look as good as possible.

With that, you have to try things. I've put my subjects in positions that just didn't work. Sometimes I couldn't even see anything worth snapping the shutter for. Sometimes we've expended a lot of effort trying to make something work that didn't. Other times brilliant ideas have come easy. You can't be timid.

This is the biggest thing I've learned is to be "bossy" and direct at will. If she has experience doing this, listen to her ideas too--many of my photographs are true collaborations! (The inexperienced usually won't say anything, but you can listen if they do!) Communication is key. Discuss your visions for the shoot beforehand. Does she want the photos to be seductive? Playful? Carefree? Elegant? Figuring out your vision is a big step. Communication makes your shoot. Talk to your subjects. Ask if they're ok. Ask them if they can do pose X. Ask what they want to see. That's how you learn to pose people. They're not mannequins. They can help you.

QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
To be honest, what I did to get over this hump was to shoot downtown Portland, Oregon on a busy day. I would stop and ask folks if they would mind if I took their photo. Before I gave them a chance to answer, I would say, "Okay, just smile" and they did smile and I got some great results.
This is a bit different art. You don't pose these people; you take what you get. There's a lot of skill to this too but you have a low SNR. You can get some awesome shots, for sure, but just stopping people for a quick shot is a bit like
01-23-2016, 01:14 PM   #18
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Thanks for the help everyone. This thread is from August last year, and Tony had to bump it , Just kidding, I don't mind. But to see how far I've came, I've gotten better at posing people. I thank my sister in the photograph for helping me pose, I wouldn't have been able to do it without her! Not the best but I'm getting there.





01-24-2016, 07:21 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by MadMathMind Quote
When I first started working with models (cosplayers), I didn't know what I was doing. (I still don't, haha!) I had only shot rocks and trees and stuff. I'd just ask them to stand over there or whatever, they'd do their thing, and I'd take a photo. The results were something like this:



It's fine and all but nothing terribly interesting. In 7 months or so, now I'm doing things like this






I second this, although you can develop rapport with people during the shoot. If it's paid work (portraits for school), then you need to do it quickly, but otherwise, sometimes it will work and sometimes it will be more stiff.

The key is to get people who are patient with you for whatever reason. Perhaps some friends who always wanted to be a model on the side? There are plenty of people who like to be photographed. Find them and shoot with them. They will be patient if you are personable and enjoyable to be with.



Look at what other people do. That's the biggest thing. Browse Flickr--there's TONS of model shots out there. I found inspiration from some guys from Taiwan. I just love their work (and let's face it...the girls they shoot are otherworldly pretty, so that helps) and it's really given me ideas on how to pose people.

The hardest thing I had with posing my subjects was that I didn't want to be imposing or that I was putting them in some bizarre position. Then I realized that if someone is willing to let you take her photos, she's trusting your judgment and wants to be coached and directed. "Nah, that face is a bit derpy" is often said in my sessions and it is always appreciated. Never has anyone been insulted by being told that the current pose isn't working. It can feel creepy to survey every body part and figure out where it should go and then have to say "stick your butt out a bit more." But if she's sitting for your photos, she will appreciate you making her look as good as possible.

With that, you have to try things. I've put my subjects in positions that just didn't work. Sometimes I couldn't even see anything worth snapping the shutter for. Sometimes we've expended a lot of effort trying to make something work that didn't. Other times brilliant ideas have come easy. You can't be timid.

This is the biggest thing I've learned is to be "bossy" and direct at will. If she has experience doing this, listen to her ideas too--many of my photographs are true collaborations! (The inexperienced usually won't say anything, but you can listen if they do!) Communication is key. Discuss your visions for the shoot beforehand. Does she want the photos to be seductive? Playful? Carefree? Elegant? Figuring out your vision is a big step. Communication makes your shoot. Talk to your subjects. Ask if they're ok. Ask them if they can do pose X. Ask what they want to see. That's how you learn to pose people. They're not mannequins. They can help you.



This is a bit different art. You don't pose these people; you take what you get. There's a lot of skill to this too but you have a low SNR. You can get some awesome shots, for sure, but just stopping people for a quick shot is a bit like
I am not exactly clear on what you are saying. The topic is how to overcome fear of photographing people. That idea of just going to a busy downtown area worked very well for me. So now I have no fear of doing portraits indoor and outdoor. What is SNR? Thanks, Tony

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