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05-31-2016, 01:01 AM   #1
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Hoya Close Up Filters

I mostly shoot with a K-5 and 18-135 lens This suits the usual subjects I photograph.
Very rarely I come across a subject where I would like to get in closer that the 18-135 allows.
This is not often enough to justify buying and carrying a dedicated macro lens around, but it is often enough to be irritating.

A friend suggested a set of Hoya Close Up Filters as a low cost and easy to carry solution.
Has anyone tried these filters with success or are they not worth having?

Would sincerely appreciate any advice.

Tony

05-31-2016, 01:12 AM - 1 Like   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Anton Magus Quote
I mostly shoot with a K-5 and 18-135 lens This suits the usual subjects I photograph.
Very rarely I come across a subject where I would like to get in closer that the 18-135 allows.
This is not often enough to justify buying and carrying a dedicated macro lens around, but it is often enough to be irritating.

A friend suggested a set of Hoya Close Up Filters as a low cost and easy to carry solution.
Has anyone tried these filters with success or are they not worth having?

Would sincerely appreciate any advice.

Tony


I think a close up filter is a good idea, it saves opening up the camera and fitting a macro or close focus lens. I bought some second hand and have not used them much as I have dedicated macro lenses as well as a couple of Tamron Zooms that close focus but I did try one out on an old Sigma 24-70mm that has a reputation for being pretty bad and the images seemed no worse (to me) than the lens naked. A better zoom might show up deficiencies but it is a low cost option that could be tried.




05-31-2016, 01:46 AM   #3
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I had one for my 18-135 and it worked pretty well - got it for 15€ but then gave it away when I sold the lens - didn't have anything with 62mm filters.
I'll see if I can find a sample.
05-31-2016, 02:06 AM   #4
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Hoya Close Up Filters

Thanks Skodadriver and Giklab for your very useful comments.

The images posted seem fine for my purposes and I will give these filters a try.

Tony

05-31-2016, 03:09 AM - 1 Like   #5
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Here are some from last year in Cortina.
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05-31-2016, 03:41 AM   #6
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Great images, Giklab. That's pretty much the sort of image I want to achieve.

Tony
05-31-2016, 03:51 AM   #7
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Here's another - I don't think any of these were at closest focusing distance though, and I can't find any that were right now.
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05-31-2016, 04:36 AM   #8
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I have a couple of related questions concerning these close up filters. I also have the DA 18-135 lens, and was wondering which "strength" (from +1 to +4, as you find them in shops) would be the most suitable for doing some macro work with this lens. From what I read, it depends a bit on which focal lens you are working with, right?
Alternatively, I also own the DA 50mm, which has better image quality and is much faster. Would it be more suitable for this kind of application? In this case, what would be the answer to the previous question?
I thank you all for taking the time of answering my questions!

05-31-2016, 05:18 AM - 1 Like   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aljech Quote
I have a couple of related questions concerning these close up filters. I also have the DA 18-135 lens, and was wondering which "strength" (from +1 to +4, as you find them in shops) would be the most suitable for doing some macro work with this lens. From what I read, it depends a bit on which focal lens you are working with, right?
Alternatively, I also own the DA 50mm, which has better image quality and is much faster. Would it be more suitable for this kind of application? In this case, what would be the answer to the previous question?
I thank you all for taking the time of answering my questions!


I suggest that you will find some image degradation from using filters as well as a reduction in the amount of light hitting the sensor. I bought them for basically just playing with, there are probably better options with extension tubes and dedicated macro lenses. The little I have read about macro suggests that these will provide better images than close focus filters.
The close focus filters can have one or two optical elements, two being much more expensive than one but providing better image quality and of course they can also be stacked to provide more strength.
The smaller the filter size (e.g. on your DA 50) the cheaper they are.
On the other hand;
If you have an old "A" contact teleconverter they make good extension tubes apparently when "deglassed", as extension tubes with contacts are quite expensive.
There is a wealth of information and experience available in the Pentax forums and on the net, have a good read and if you are not expecting too much in the way of a macro image a few pennies will get you on the way with being able to focus closer.
05-31-2016, 05:58 AM   #10
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Mine was a +3 and it gave a good and comfortable mfd decrease. The 50mm would probably work better with a filter as you start out with a better lens and the filter itself is a smaller diameter.
05-31-2016, 06:20 AM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Aljech Quote
I have a couple of related questions concerning these close up filters. I also have the DA 18-135 lens, and was wondering which "strength" (from +1 to +4, as you find them in shops) would be the most suitable for doing some macro work with this lens. From what I read, it depends a bit on which focal lens you are working with, right?
Alternatively, I also own the DA 50mm, which has better image quality and is much faster. Would it be more suitable for this kind of application? In this case, what would be the answer to the previous question?
I thank you all for taking the time of answering my questions!
I have also been told that you will get better results from higher f-stops otherwise the depth of field gets wafer-thin so your 50mm lens may not be such an advantage.
Maybe someone with more experience can share their thoughts on this?

Tony
05-31-2016, 06:25 AM - 2 Likes   #12
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I have set I've been using for awhile. They are Hoya brand and are +1, +2, and +3. I stack all three onto a Pentax A 50mm f2. Here's an example taken this month in the SIC. Click on the photo and check the f stop.

05-31-2016, 06:34 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Anton Magus Quote
I have also been told that you will get better results from higher f-stops otherwise the depth of field gets wafer-thin so your 50mm lens may not be such an advantage.
Maybe someone with more experience can share their thoughts on this?

Tony




Absolutely, stop down as much as you can for the depth of field you would like. Use flash if you need more light to stop down.


The longer the focal length of your lens, the more distance you can achieve between the subject and the camera.


Use a tripod and maybe manual focus are the two tips that go along with this. A ring flash can be good for macro too.


At least with a close up filter, one can hand hold, have AF (though there might be some hunting at higher strength filters) and with luck, if your Pentax sensor can supply good photos at high ISO's, a great start with macro.
05-31-2016, 06:36 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by Skodadriver Quote
Use flash if you need more light to stop down.
On board flash works good for this too, no need for external flash if you do not have one. I have mine set to -.03 and it isn't as harsh as full on.

I don't use tripods on macro shots, and AF is useless. It changes point of view. As in, if you want 1:1 macro, if you use AF you won't get 1:1 shots. Manual focus, you move camera in and out on subject to get focus.
05-31-2016, 06:40 AM - 2 Likes   #15
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I have used screw-on close-up lenses (a.k.a. filters) since the '70s. I have two sets, one for 49mm and one for 52mm. Each set has a +1, +2, and +4. They are convenient and don't reduce the amount of light reaching the sensor by any significant amount if you only use one or two at a time. I usually only use one at a time; I have very seldom stacked them. Yes, you can combine a +1 and a +2 to get +3, but I have not found this to be necessary to get the framing I want. YMMV.

Of course, any time you add more glass to the light path, you are going to degrade the image somewhat. However, since the close-up lenses magnify details within the image, this fine detail is spread over a larger portion of the frame, and captured by more pixels. Though adding more glass may technically reduce lens resolution, the net affect is that the added magnification makes this less important in capturing detail.

Consider these screw-on close-up lenses as lenses indeed, and buy the best quality you can afford. I haven't researched them lately, but I'm sure there is a variety of prices and quality levels out there. Uncoated, single coated, multi-coated, etc. A high quality close-up lens used with a high quality main lens can give pretty good results. Not as good as a dedicated macro lens, but 1/10th(?) the price.

Pentax-M 50mmf1.7 with +2 Vivitar close-up lens


Pentax-M 50mmf1.7 with +1 Vivitar close-up lens
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