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11-08-2019, 02:32 PM - 1 Like   #61
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pentikonian Quote
Thanks a bunch for taking the time to write this, and answer questions.

I spent time this evening reading through the thread and trying to digest the info. One of the projects I set for myself this year is to try some astro between Oct and Feb.

I figured I'd start with something easy to find, like the constellation Orion. Probably with the DFA*50 on my K-1.

After getting the basics down, I hope to tighten the view a bit and try to isolate the Orion Nebula.

Debating whether or not to invest in a light pollution filter. There's still a mix of LED, Incandescent, Sodium and Mercury lights here, and I doubt I'll be able to get out to dark skies for most of these attempts.
In your neck of the woods Orion will rise about completely above the horizon at around 11:00 pm. A 50mm lens is good for Orion because it just about perfectly covers the sensor. If you're looking for something else astro to shoot, the Pleiades cluster in the constellation Taurus rises above the horizon at about 6:00pm and is visible all night.


I'd suggest a 200mm and the Astrotracer function.

There are three meteor showers coming up between now and February. The Leonids peak on November 17-18. The Geminids peak on December 13-14. The full moon is Dec. 12th so it isn't an ideal time but it's a big shower. The peak of the Quantarids shower is January 3-4. It could be a pretty good show.



I'd use a 50mm or a 28mm for meteor showers.

There's also the International space station.



and Iridium flares.




Shedules for the ISS and Iridium flares can be found here Heavens-Above

11-08-2019, 03:18 PM   #62
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QuoteOriginally posted by gifthorse Quote
In your neck of the woods Orion will rise about completely above the horizon at around 11:00 pm. A 50mm lens is good for Orion because it just about perfectly covers the sensor. If you're looking for something else astro to shoot, the Pleiades cluster in the constellation Taurus rises above the horizon at about 6:00pm and is visible all night.


I'd suggest a 200mm and the Astrotracer function.

There are three meteor showers coming up between now and February. The Leonids peak on November 17-18. The Geminids peak on December 13-14. The full moon is Dec. 12th so it isn't an ideal time but it's a big shower. The peak of the Quantarids shower is January 3-4. It could be a pretty good show.



I'd use a 50mm or a 28mm for meteor showers.

There's also the International space station.



and Iridium flares.




Shedules for the ISS and Iridium flares can be found here Heavens-Above
Thanks for the info. I have quite a bit to learn, and I'm sure it'll be a long learning curve. Hoping to have fun with it.
11-19-2019, 01:29 PM - 1 Like   #63
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pentikonian Quote
I figured I'd start with something easy to find, like the constellation Orion. Probably with the DFA*50 on my K-1.
A constelation is always a nice thing to start with and you will probably get the Orion nebula showing up fairly nicely with the 50mm and K-1. I've gotten it in untracked shots with my S-M-C 28mm f/3.5 Takumar and the K-3. The Orion Nebula is always a good starter target as is the Pleiades as they are big, bright, and easy to find.

QuoteOriginally posted by Pentikonian Quote
After getting the basics down, I hope to tighten the view a bit and try to isolate the Orion Nebula.
A 300mm lens would provide a nice view of it with running man also in the frame. With a 300 and a K-1 you should also be able to get the horsehead nebula and flame nebula in the frame as well.

QuoteOriginally posted by Pentikonian Quote
Debating whether or not to invest in a light pollution filter. There's still a mix of LED, Incandescent, Sodium and Mercury lights here, and I doubt I'll be able to get out to dark skies for most of these attempts.
They Hoya red Intensifier is a good option and isn't that expensive at about $80 for a 77mm filter thread size one so get that one and some stepdown rings and use it on a bunch of lenses. That is what I did and since you are going from a bigger filter to smaller lens you don't need to worry about vignetting. If you really get into things then spending some more on a better light pollution filter might be warranted, but if you just want to play some the hoya filter is a cheap way to start. Even if moderately dark skies a light pollution filter will help with the sky glow near the horizon where you will still have problems from lights off in the distance.
11-20-2019, 06:58 PM   #64
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
A constelation is always a nice thing to start with and you will probably get the Orion nebula showing up fairly nicely with the 50mm and K-1. I've gotten it in untracked shots with my S-M-C 28mm f/3.5 Takumar and the K-3. The Orion Nebula is always a good starter target as is the Pleiades as they are big, bright, and easy to find.


A 300mm lens would provide a nice view of it with running man also in the frame. With a 300 and a K-1 you should also be able to get the horsehead nebula and flame nebula in the frame as well.



They Hoya red Intensifier is a good option and isn't that expensive at about $80 for a 77mm filter thread size one so get that one and some stepdown rings and use it on a bunch of lenses. That is what I did and since you are going from a bigger filter to smaller lens you don't need to worry about vignetting. If you really get into things then spending some more on a better light pollution filter might be warranted, but if you just want to play some the hoya filter is a cheap way to start. Even if moderately dark skies a light pollution filter will help with the sky glow near the horizon where you will still have problems from lights off in the distance.
Thanks for the info. This thread has a lot of great knowledge to digest. Need to do a few more read-throughs and watch some videos. And decide which stacking program to try.

I'll have to dig out my stack of rings and see if I already have 77 to 72.

11-20-2019, 11:05 PM   #65
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pentikonian Quote
And decide which stacking program to try.
Start with Deep Sky Stacker (DSS) it is free and when you start out it won't be the limiting factor in your pictures. Beyond cropping the image don't do any actual editing in it though as it really sucks for that.

I don't know if earlier in the thread if I mentioned some video tutorials on editing but some that I got referred to by one of the greats over in the astro group
. Some of them are pretty quite but they cover the basics that will be applicable to almost everything you will want to do with editing astro images. There are a lot more techniques that are available and a lot more software but knowing these basics will still be applicable with those as well.
11-20-2019, 11:44 PM   #66
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
Start with Deep Sky Stacker (DSS) it is free and when you start out it won't be the limiting factor in your pictures. Beyond cropping the image don't do any actual editing in it though as it really sucks for that.

I don't know if earlier in the thread if I mentioned some video tutorials on editing but some that I got referred to by one of the greats over in the astro group is this series. Some of them are pretty quite but they cover the basics that will be applicable to almost everything you will want to do with editing astro images. There are a lot more techniques that are available and a lot more software but knowing these basics will still be applicable with those as well.
Thanks. I may have to adapt a bit on the processing as I'm using Affinity and an older version of DXO. It's going to interesting once I get started.
11-21-2019, 10:05 AM   #67
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pentikonian Quote
Thanks. I may have to adapt a bit on the processing as I'm using Affinity and an older version of DXO. It's going to interesting once I get started.
You may want to learn GIMP. I've not used Affinity or DXO so I'm not sure how they stack up against photoshop but you would be looking for almost a 1:1 feature map of the techniques mentioned in the videos and with only some minor trickery GIMP can do that. I still use photoshop CS3 for some editing of astro images and even the current Creative Cloud version of photoshop doesn't allow much 32bit per channel edits like the current GIMP does.
11-21-2019, 01:02 PM   #68
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
You may want to learn GIMP. I've not used Affinity or DXO so I'm not sure how they stack up against photoshop but you would be looking for almost a 1:1 feature map of the techniques mentioned in the videos and with only some minor trickery GIMP can do that. I still use photoshop CS3 for some editing of astro images and even the current Creative Cloud version of photoshop doesn't allow much 32bit per channel edits like the current GIMP does.
Last time I tried GIMP was years ago, and didn't like the experience. I understand they've made updates/ changes, so I'll give them another look when I have the time.

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