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05-23-2019, 07:55 AM - 1 Like   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by desertscape Quote
Being good at landscape shooting is a lot of work and planning. Like what was said above; you must travel to find the best scenes to put in front of your camera. Predicting a scene is essential for being in the right place at the right time. I have been in locations where I though to myself; this would be great with snow.... and would wait for snow cover and return and shoot it. It's always best to shoot a scene that has "wow factor". The scene must have an emotional response from you to be able to have a positive response from viewers of your work.
Planning indeed! I think the trick will be to find the right place, and then knowing when to visit that spot!

I actually discovered the other night (though I've still to review the shots) that it was a lot of fun to cycle around the place with my camera on my back - shooting and scooting. I covered a good few miles of coastline shots - BUT - with the caveat that I didn't spend much time at each location before moving on.

In other words, I was focusing on low "cost" (time in this case) and high quantity (area covered) - so my quality (attention to minute detail) in each shot suffered - but in future, I reckon bouncing around on my bike is the way to go - it'd be great for scouting out areas, and if I keep the camera on my back, I can take it out whenever I feel I have a good shot (though, unless I get lucky, the time won't be optimal).

I'll curate the pictures I took the other night and get a couple posted up here. I had decent lighting (sun had just gone down so the sky looked good (if I do say so myself) - though it'd probably have been better had I waited an extra half hour - but I wanted to get home since it was cold and getting late!

05-27-2019, 02:14 AM - 1 Like   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
Planning indeed! I think the trick will be to find the right place, and then knowing when to visit that spot!

I actually discovered the other night (though I've still to review the shots) that it was a lot of fun to cycle around the place with my camera on my back - shooting and scooting. I covered a good few miles of coastline shots - BUT - with the caveat that I didn't spend much time at each location before moving on.

In other words, I was focusing on low "cost" (time in this case) and high quantity (area covered) - so my quality (attention to minute detail) in each shot suffered - but in future, I reckon bouncing around on my bike is the way to go - it'd be great for scouting out areas, and if I keep the camera on my back, I can take it out whenever I feel I have a good shot (though, unless I get lucky, the time won't be optimal).

I'll curate the pictures I took the other night and get a couple posted up here. I had decent lighting (sun had just gone down so the sky looked good (if I do say so myself) - though it'd probably have been better had I waited an extra half hour - but I wanted to get home since it was cold and getting late!
Oooookay - so I dun' goofed! I was running over the pictures at the weekend and noticed that they're all a little soft... so I stopped to think about it for a minute and... whooooooops, made a rookie mistake!

I had the aperture wide open!

I was using one of these Vivitar 28mm lenses - I like the FoV, it's compact, and the focus ring is smooth as butter - and, I thought that the F/2.8 aperture would be useful for the low light... which is technically speaking true, I suppose...... but practically speaking, it's soft when wide open!

I'd have been better raising the ISO and stopping down the aperture - at 28mm, I could have gotten away with a minimum of 1/42s, maybe call that 1/80 or 1/100s just to keep the shake right down. I'd much rather have a grainy but crisp image than a shake-free, but ultimately soft one!

Rookie error - should have remembered the sweet spot!
05-27-2019, 12:11 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
I'd have been better raising the ISO and stopping down the aperture - at 28mm, I could have gotten away with a minimum of 1/42s, maybe call that 1/80 or 1/100s just to keep the shake right down. I'd much rather have a grainy but crisp image than a shake-free, but ultimately soft one!
With shake reduction, you could take shots at 1/10s and get good results.
05-27-2019, 11:45 PM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by rogerstg Quote
With shake reduction, you could take shots at 1/10s and get good results.
Holy-canole! I didn't realise the shake-reduction was that good! I take it it's less effective the longer the focal length of the lens? Is there a rule of thumb for gauging it's effectiveness vs focal length/shutterspeed?

05-28-2019, 03:58 AM   #20
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
Is there a rule of thumb for gauging it's effectiveness vs focal length/shutterspeed?
With 35mm format, before SR, it was 1 divided by lens focal length, assuming good technique. A 100mm lens would use 1/100th second. With crop sensors, the requirement would be 1/150s for that same lens. If SR is good for 4 stops, 1/150 becomes ~ 1/10s.

Last edited by rogerstg; 05-28-2019 at 08:25 AM. Reason: clarify
05-28-2019, 05:03 AM - 1 Like   #21
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Also, this guy offers some practical advice for beginning landscape photography

Last edited by rogerstg; 05-28-2019 at 08:28 AM. Reason: typo
05-28-2019, 07:06 AM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by rogerstg Quote
Also, I this guy offers some practical advice for beginning landscape photography
5 BEGINNER Landscape Photography MISTAKES To AVOID - YouTube
That's tonight's viewing sorted!
05-28-2019, 07:36 AM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
Oooookay - so I dun' goofed! I was running over the pictures at the weekend and noticed that they're all a little soft... so I stopped to think about it for a minute and... whooooooops, made a rookie mistake!

I had the aperture wide open!

I was using one of these Vivitar 28mm lenses - I like the FoV, it's compact, and the focus ring is smooth as butter - and, I thought that the F/2.8 aperture would be useful for the low light... which is technically speaking true, I suppose...... but practically speaking, it's soft when wide open!

I'd have been better raising the ISO and stopping down the aperture - at 28mm, I could have gotten away with a minimum of 1/42s, maybe call that 1/80 or 1/100s just to keep the shake right down. I'd much rather have a grainy but crisp image than a shake-free, but ultimately soft one!

Rookie error - should have remembered the sweet spot!
Some thoughts as just found this thread.

Tripod, base ISO and f8 unless you have a reason to do something different. I always use IR remote with 3s delay to make sure there are no vibrations. If you don't have IR remote, you can find them for few dollars from ebay. Due to shutter shock on K1ii I've started to use electronic shutter when I have camera on tripod.

Shoot RAW and learn PP. It's the digital way. You can do a lot to make the most out of the light. Stitching and stacking also open a lot of new possibilities. Good software is worth the money.

CPL and ND filters are all and what you need in digital age as both provide something that is hard to emulate in PP.

Aim for quolity, not quantity. Shoot as much as you like. Just don't spend PP time on mediacore frames. Concentrate on good ones. Even one good shot a day is plenty. Personally I delete everything I don't develope into jpg.

05-29-2019, 12:17 AM   #24
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QuoteOriginally posted by iheiramo Quote
Some thoughts as just found this thread.

Tripod, base ISO and f8 unless you have a reason to do something different. I always use IR remote with 3s delay to make sure there are no vibrations. If you don't have IR remote, you can find them for few dollars from ebay. Due to shutter shock on K1ii I've started to use electronic shutter when I have camera on tripod.

Shoot RAW and learn PP. It's the digital way. You can do a lot to make the most out of the light. Stitching and stacking also open a lot of new possibilities. Good software is worth the money.

CPL and ND filters are all and what you need in digital age as both provide something that is hard to emulate in PP.

Aim for quolity, not quantity. Shoot as much as you like. Just don't spend PP time on mediacore frames. Concentrate on good ones. Even one good shot a day is plenty. Personally I delete everything I don't develope into jpg.
I may need to start emulating your policy of deleting anything that I don't develop - just now I have a curated (and surprisingly well-organised) folder structure for developed images - and a generic "raw dump" where I just dump everything off the card for development later - except I leave them there after I process the good ones... so the raw dump folder has every picture I've ever taken (organised by date taken) - and there really isn't any need for it. I've been hoarding them "just in case". To be fair, I just haven't had a need to get rid of them - the hard drive is less than 20% full - so there's been no pressure for me to get rid of them :P

Thinning the herd seems like a good idea though - it's not like I'm using them for anything!


Tripod would be great, but it's a nuisance when I'm on my bike - I can use the bike to get somewhere, lock it up, and walk around if I wanted - but I'm rather enjoying the practice of shooting-'n'-scooting. I just realised - I think I stole the term "shoot-and-scoot" from artillery tactics - though I do it to cover more ground, as I have the luxury of not needing to worry about counter-battery fire.

For serious shots, I'll definitely hoik out a tripod - but for shooting and scooting, I'm thinking of using a bit of cord with a hook on the end as a string-monopod. It should be long enough that I can use it as a regular string monopod, but the trick is, if folded in half (looped over itself) I can put that hook on the bike frame and use that as a stable platform to pull against. When combined with me canting the bike over a little and putting one foot flat on the ground, it makes a triangle between my foot and the two wheels, which I discovered is surprisingly stable for handholding (and should be even better when combined with the string).

In fact, I reckon I was more stable while handholding, seated on the bike with one foot on the ground than I am handholding and standing. Wider base, I suppose!

ANYWAY - I'll definitely be using the tripod for serious shots - it's not a terrible hassle to take it on the bike with me - just a pest deploying and undeploying it - which is why I should definitely consider the option of cycling to my destination, scouting on my way through, locking up the bike and the far end of the destination, and hoofing it back to the prime spots for some tripod action!

Side note: do shots of town skylines count as landscape shots? I mean, towns are part of the landscape - but is it landscape photography to capture them?
05-29-2019, 01:11 AM - 1 Like   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
I may need to start emulating your policy of deleting anything that I don't develop

I used to keep all my raw files no matter how bad, but nowadays as soon as I get home I delete everything except the shots I want to process. This has had the follow-on effect that most of the time I won't even take a shot these days unless I'm sure it's something I'll want to keep. So now I think a lot more carefully before I decide if I'm going to press the shutter or not, and that has definitely improved my end results. It has made my digital shooting style more like it was in the film days, where every frame had to justify itself because it cost money.
05-29-2019, 02:34 AM   #26
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In your own local area, find a scene you like.
Then spend some time working out the perspective which works best.
Then consult the oracle about what time of day/phase of moon will do it justice.
Then wait for the right weather, at the right time.
Then get there early, make sure you have the right focal length lens, and whether certain filters might need optimise the shot.
Set up your tripod. Bracket. Chimp. Adjust.
Then go home and process.
Then print optimally.

There's quite a bit to landscape photography. I'm just starting to get my head around it.
05-29-2019, 02:42 AM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote
In your own local area, find a scene you like.
Then spend some time working out the perspective which works best.
Then consult the oracle about what time of day/phase of moon will do it justice.
Then wait for the right weather, at the right time.
Then get there early, make sure you have the right focal length lens, and whether certain filters might need optimise the shot.
Set up your tripod. Bracket. Chimp. Adjust.
Then go home and process.
Then print optimally.
That's good advice - I'd also add, keep going back in different seasons and weather conditions as well as times of day - you learn a lot by observing the effect of those changes on a familiar scene - like a scientific experiment where you try to ,linit the number of variables to better appreciate the effect of the one you're studyingn - so it's not the scenery that makes a shot stand out from the others, it;s the lighting/ seasonal colouring / cloud structure etc etc
05-30-2019, 12:40 AM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by rogerstg Quote
With 35mm format, before SR, it was 1 divided by lens focal length, assuming good technique. A 100mm lens would use 1/100th second. With crop sensors, the requirement would be 1/150s for that same lens. If SR is good for 4 stops, 1/150 becomes ~ 1/10s.
A-Ha! The exclamation, not the band. So it is the equivalent (image stability-wise) to dropping a number of stops and you can calculate from there. How do we know that it is good for, say, 4 stops though?

In reality I'm not too concerned about the specifics - a rule of thumb would probably suffice (in my case I generally just settle for 1/focal-length and leave it there, sometimes doubling it if I have a longer focal length and need a bit of extra stability (like when using my 600mm catadioptric lens).



QuoteOriginally posted by Dartmoor Dave Quote
I used to keep all my raw files no matter how bad, but nowadays as soon as I get home I delete everything except the shots I want to process. This has had the follow-on effect that most of the time I won't even take a shot these days unless I'm sure it's something I'll want to keep. So now I think a lot more carefully before I decide if I'm going to press the shutter or not, and that has definitely improved my end results. It has made my digital shooting style more like it was in the film days, where every frame had to justify itself because it cost money.
Sometimes I go out with a 1gB card so I only get 30-odd shots - pretty much the same idea - but what happens is that I take too many shots and end up going back and deleting them in-camera while I'm out and about, so I'm not really getting into the swing of things when it comes to taking time to get good shots.

I'm going to start that policy of scrubbing all but the best though - as you said, it makes you think more



QuoteOriginally posted by Sandy Hancock Quote
In your own local area, find a scene you like.
Then spend some time working out the perspective which works best.
Then consult the oracle about what time of day/phase of moon will do it justice.
Then wait for the right weather, at the right time.
Then get there early, make sure you have the right focal length lens, and whether certain filters might need optimise the shot.
Set up your tripod. Bracket. Chimp. Adjust.
Then go home and process.
Then print optimally.

There's quite a bit to landscape photography. I'm just starting to get my head around it.
This gave me SO much deja vu - brains are weird!

I'm totally going to make short poem or song out of that at some point In the meantime - I'll just need to get out and experiment!



QuoteOriginally posted by ffking Quote
That's good advice - I'd also add, keep going back in different seasons and weather conditions as well as times of day - you learn a lot by observing the effect of those changes on a familiar scene - like a scientific experiment where you try to ,linit the number of variables to better appreciate the effect of the one you're studyingn - so it's not the scenery that makes a shot stand out from the others, it;s the lighting/ seasonal colouring / cloud structure etc etc
Brute-force the landscape until it yields under my iterational might! Got it xD

I think my biggest weakness just now is lighting - I seem to have pretty flat lighting a lot of the time; mostly because I tend to end up walking/cycling mostly when it's dry and sunny!

So - there is a local river near me with a few nice bends in it. It's not a big river, nor is it particularly beauteous, nor particularly long - but it still has charm: there's a path that runs alongside it as it weaves its way through the suburbs and some playing fields bordered with trees - and it is within a short walk from my house - it'd be a good place to iterate over various shots at different times of day and under different weather conditions.

Thanks for the tips - plenty for me to mull over!
05-30-2019, 01:25 AM   #29
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
Brute-force the landscape until it yields under my iterational might! Got it xD
- you got it!
05-30-2019, 07:39 AM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by cprobertson1 Quote
A-Ha! The exclamation, not the band. So it is the equivalent (image stability-wise) to dropping a number of stops and you can calculate from there. How do we know that it is good for, say, 4 stops though?

In reality I'm not too concerned about the specifics - a rule of thumb would probably suffice (in my case I generally just settle for 1/focal-length and leave it there, sometimes doubling it if I have a longer focal length and need a bit of extra stability (like when using my 600mm catadioptric lens).





Sometimes I go out with a 1gB card so I only get 30-odd shots - pretty much the same idea - but what happens is that I take too many shots and end up going back and deleting them in-camera while I'm out and about, so I'm not really getting into the swing of things when it comes to taking time to get good shots.

I'm going to start that policy of scrubbing all but the best though - as you said, it makes you think more





This gave me SO much deja vu - brains are weird!

I'm totally going to make short poem or song out of that at some point In the meantime - I'll just need to get out and experiment!





Brute-force the landscape until it yields under my iterational might! Got it xD

I think my biggest weakness just now is lighting - I seem to have pretty flat lighting a lot of the time; mostly because I tend to end up walking/cycling mostly when it's dry and sunny!

So - there is a local river near me with a few nice bends in it. It's not a big river, nor is it particularly beauteous, nor particularly long - but it still has charm: there's a path that runs alongside it as it weaves its way through the suburbs and some playing fields bordered with trees - and it is within a short walk from my house - it'd be a good place to iterate over various shots at different times of day and under different weather conditions.

Thanks for the tips - plenty for me to mull over!
My typical settings for landscape and APS-C are f8 and one stop under exposed. That usually is pretty effective at protecting highlights and shadows aren't so dark that I can't get pretty detail out of them in post. For tough situations, using liveview and adjusting your exposure to fit the situation or even getting multiple exposures can be pretty helpful.
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