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08-07-2019, 02:10 AM   #1
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Learn to pose models?

Hopefully this is the right section to post in. Id like to start shooting people, specifically posed models. How do I begin to learn how to pose models, most if not all of of whom will also be rank amateurs?

08-07-2019, 04:19 AM - 1 Like   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by JustDisGuy Quote
Hopefully this is the right section to post in. Id like to start shooting people, specifically posed models. How do I begin to learn how to pose models, most if not all of of whom will also be rank amateurs?
1) Take a course in lighting.
2) If you havent already, take a course in human relations.
3) Look through some of the portfolios on Model Mayhem or similar website.
4) I found that working with one model pretty much exclusively for a couple of years really helped.
08-07-2019, 04:37 AM - 1 Like   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by JustDisGuy Quote
Hopefully this is the right section to post in. I’d like to start shooting people, specifically posed models. How do I begin to learn how to pose models, most if not all of of whom will also be rank amateurs?
Youtube can be your friend. Here is a video I stumbled across on posing that is good.


There is also plenty of books about posing out there. I have a good one but I don't remember the name at the moment. I will look for it later after I get some sleep.


Found it. It is an older book from the eighties. This book deals with studio photography. The great part about this book is chapter 8. Chapter 8 goes into detail on how each pose is set up including diagrams of where the lights and reflectors are set up in relation to both the subject and the camera.

https://www.amazon.com/Techniques-Beauty-Glamour-Photography-photobooks/dp/0...s%2C175&sr=1-7

The same author has another book that talks about just shooting photos of regular people. I don't have the book but, I am fairly certain it is set up the same way.

https://www.amazon.com/Techniques-People-Photography-Gary-Bernstein/dp/08958...VBN9K4CZ1T3X3P

I am not affiliated with Amazon or Gary Bernstein.

Last edited by bigdavephoto; 08-07-2019 at 11:02 AM. Reason: Added info about books.
08-07-2019, 10:12 AM - 1 Like   #4
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I have an acquaintance who models and when asked about lack of skilled direction from inexperienced photographers, her response was simply, "that is the value of an experienced model". Part of her job is to protect both her reputation and poorly posed photos do little in that regard.


Steve

08-07-2019, 10:37 AM   #5
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You could look for 'posing guides'. Posing Guide: 100+ Ideas for Couples, Women, Men, Children, and Groups - Video School Online is a good start ...
08-07-2019, 02:52 PM - 3 Likes   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by stevebrot Quote
I have an acquaintance who models and when asked about lack of skilled direction from inexperienced photographers, her response was simply, "that is the value of an experienced model". Part of her job is to protect both her reputation and poorly posed photos do little in that regard.


Steve
To add to this, there is nothing better for an inexperienced photographer than to work with an experienced model. You will be working with someone who already knows how to look good for the camera.
I'm my first post I mentioned working with the same person over and over. This gives both people experience at what they do, and over time the easy rapport that is built by working together will make for better pictures as well.
I've been in both situations. An upright Prima Donna is not my first choice for someone to work with. They can exude a special sort of toxicity that can make you want to stick a pen in your eye.

The other advice I have is don't be a jerk. The model has skin in the game as well. The ones I shot tended to have a lot of skin in the game.
A model will make or break a photo shoot. Don't be an ass about anything. If you are doing time for print, then deliver pictures on time. If you are paying money, then pay fairly and quickly.
If the model wants a few files for his or her portfolio, hand them over with rights to do what they want.
If you read the forums on Model Mayhem, a recurring theme is "I shot a model and now she's put my pictures on Instagram without my permission, what should I do?".
Generally the egos come out in full force, and the advice is issue takedown notices, send her a ridiculously high invoice and that sort of thing.
One would think these people poop roses.

I take a pretty relaxed approach. I write both my name and the model's name into the exif data and share the copyright. I've always felt this is most fair, especially in a TFP agreement.
The alternative is to be a jerk and watch how long it takes before no one will work with you.
08-07-2019, 04:38 PM - 4 Likes   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by JustDisGuy Quote
Hopefully this is the right section to post in. I’d like to start shooting people, specifically posed models. How do I begin to learn how to pose models, most if not all of of whom will also be rank amateurs?
You will have to do the heavy lifting for amateurs, JustDisGuy.

The actual posing part needs to be previsualized, and you can quickly tell them in order where you want their feet, then their shoulders, then their nose, then their eyes, pointing. For some the only way they will look natural (especially men) is to give them something to do - lean against the wall, over the back of the chair, walk towards you, hold the fishing rod, etc. A master of posing whose books you can buy is Roberto Valenzuela (bonus - he's a natural light guru too).

The final part is the expression, you can't press the shutter button until that's right or you've wasted everyone's time including yours. A master of banter and rapport you can google is Peter Hurley.
08-08-2019, 03:15 AM   #8
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I learn from a fashion photographer who teaches us to ask the models to just keep moving however they feel and not to ever stop for too long.

Your job is then to click at the great moments and move on when you have just missed one. There will always be another.

If you check out his website peter-coulson.com.au, you can see he gets the odd nice shot.

Working with models who like their work and are willing to put in some effort to teach you is also very helpful.

08-08-2019, 03:47 AM - 1 Like   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by Billk Quote
I learn from a fashion photographer who teaches us to ask the models to just keep moving however they feel and not to ever stop for too long.

Your job is then to click at the great moments and move on when you have just missed one.
That flow posing is really professional models going through their repertoire of posed moves, with no interaction from you. They produce practiced, soulless results, but that's because in fashion you don't want them to even look at the camera, because it distracts from the dress, and it's the clothing manufacturer paying the photographer you have to impress, not the person wearing it.

Real different situation from portrait photography of 'real people', Bill, paying you for their family shot or LinkedIn profile or pic to appear in a magazine supplement accompanying a story.
08-08-2019, 04:07 AM   #10
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The more real a portrait shot is, the less likely it is to have been rigidly posed.
08-08-2019, 06:03 AM - 3 Likes   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by Billk Quote
The more real a portrait shot is, the less likely it is to have been rigidly posed.
There's real.. candids and posed portraits.

Let's not get confused.

These folks are posing.... my shots of them posing are candids.












Posing for pictures has always been thing.



Real is not a requirement.

Last edited by normhead; 08-08-2019 at 06:26 AM.
08-08-2019, 07:07 AM - 1 Like   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
These folks are posing.... my shots of them posing are candids.
So simple, yet so true.

---------- Post added 08-08-19 at 10:14 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by bigdavephoto Quote
Here is a video I stumbled across on posing that is good.
I watched the first ~30 mins = outside the initial 5 min banter, there is A LOT of very simple but useful info I just was not conscient about. I did not like that they broke their flow by inserting lighting and metering right smack in the middle of speaking about poses... that threw me off a bit since I am not at the stage of metering studio lighting, I am more interested at this time at composing the subject (I do not have a studio or lighting equiptment)... but I cannot complaint for it is a free video.

Thanks for sharing

---------- Post added 08-08-19 at 10:16 AM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by clackers Quote
you can google is Peter Hurley.
You can learn a lot from his 15 minute video ad for his DVD about headshots, gives nice insight and a good idea at what he's doing.
08-08-2019, 01:54 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Billk Quote
The more real a portrait shot is, the less likely it is to have been rigidly posed.
You can't let the subjects arrange themselves, Bill, most of the public have no clue. A man standing can cover his groin with clenched hands as if in self defence. A woman can refuse to smile because she's always looked overweight in photos recently.

The expression can be forced - that's why selfies are so bad - duckfaces, Blue Steels, etc!

As photographers, unless we're photojournalists, we decide on the lighting, mood, style, framing, props, background, pose, expression - and then make it happen, so directing subjects - minimally or minutely as required by the situation - is part of our gig.

Last edited by clackers; 08-08-2019 at 05:42 PM.
08-08-2019, 06:09 PM - 1 Like   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by normhead Quote
There's real.. candids and posed portraits.

Let's not get confused.

These folks are posing.... my shots of them posing are candids.












Posing for pictures has always been thing.



Real is not a requirement.
After seeing your excellent examples, I could not resist throwing in a few recent ones from my collection, one posed and the other not.







Steve
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