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09-03-2020, 03:54 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by jerryleejr Quote
Hope this is in the right place, I’m looking for some good books for my daughter as she’s finally getting the shutter bug!

JJ
don't forget to look at the information found under " Articles " above

there are several that would be helpful to any photographer

09-03-2020, 04:12 PM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Digital is much much easier to learn and more accessible to master. Note, I'm not saying it is easy to master, I'm saying it is more accessible to more people to try to reach that skill.
Well put. The paradigm regarding learning photography has shifted dramatically from the 1970s film era.
09-03-2020, 04:41 PM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by rogerstg Quote
Well put. The paradigm regarding learning photography has shifted dramatically from the 1970s film era.
Instant feedback is a powerful educational tool.
09-04-2020, 04:27 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by UncleVanya Quote
Instant feedback is a powerful educational tool.
Not disagreeing, but in 1968, when I started 'serious' photography (with a borrowed Nikon F, until the college found out !), I would always note all exposure details for each frame of each film, then check the 'en-prints' (anyone remember them ?) to see how my settings had affected the images. I used Tri-X, with a few common filters - none of the images were masterpieces, or even worth keeping, but I learned for myself, which I am sure helped. As for books - read as many as you can find, dealing with all aspects of photography and image making, and don't be afraid to experiment. Some information is accurate and relevant, some is, to say the least, less than helpful (I remember advice from one book that a figure in red should be in every landscape to provide a point of interest).

HTH

09-04-2020, 04:46 AM - 1 Like   #20
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Since I'm German, I've gotten the recommendation to get Harald Mante's "The Photograph: Composition and Color Design". It won't teach you how to use your camera, but will show the elements of composition and colours. It's well regarded, from its reputation I'd call it a classic, but may be a bit "oldfashioned" and dry, so perhaps not the best for children.

Can't compare it to any other, but Michael Freeman's "The Photographer's Eye" frequently pops up when I see the question.
09-04-2020, 05:48 AM - 1 Like   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by 35mmfilmfan Quote
Not disagreeing, but in 1968, when I started 'serious' photography (with a borrowed Nikon F, until the college found out !), I would always note all exposure details for each frame of each film, then check the 'en-prints' (anyone remember them ?) to see how my settings had affected the images. I used Tri-X, with a few common filters - none of the images were masterpieces, or even worth keeping, but I learned for myself, which I am sure helped. As for books - read as many as you can find, dealing with all aspects of photography and image making, and don't be afraid to experiment. Some information is accurate and relevant, some is, to say the least, less than helpful (I remember advice from one book that a figure in red should be in every landscape to provide a point of interest).

HTH
Yes indeed I did similar things but not every roll... It certainly helped. The books from the 70s often advised logging your exposure data.
09-04-2020, 05:53 AM   #22
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I like Michael Freeman's photography books -- Photographer's Eye and Photographer's Mind are the two I own.

Another book that I highly recommend is Roberto Valenzuela's "Picture Perfect Practice."
09-04-2020, 07:48 AM   #23
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All great suggestions, and yes the digital age makes it easier to learn. But I want her to have a good grasp of fundamentals and understand how each function of the camera affects the other.

JJ

09-04-2020, 10:19 AM   #24
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I forgot...
"Photographing Buildings Inside and Out" by Robert McGrath. I still have a copy.

Obviously it is architectural photography, but it has general concepts and thoughts about horizontal vs vertical, angles and views, best times of the day, composition and other factors which apply to most photography.

Mine has a different cover photo than this one.

Photographing Buildings Inside and Out: McGrath, Norman: 9780823040162: amazon.com: Books?tag=pentaxforums-20&

Cheers.
09-04-2020, 11:32 AM - 2 Likes   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by BigMackCam Quote
Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" is an excellent place to start for the fundamentals.
I read his 'Understanding Composition' field guide. It focuses on developing the art of 'seeing'. An artist starts with a blank canvas and adds stuff to create the image in his mind's eye. A photographer starts with a scene full of stuff and has to remove elements that distract from his intended subject. The book discusses the 'rule of thirds' and how to add impact/interest. Though I didn't agree with everything he said, it was nevertheless very 'eye-opening' (pun intended) and educational. Lots of useful ideas.
09-04-2020, 01:00 PM - 1 Like   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by jerryleejr Quote
All great suggestions, and yes the digital age makes it easier to learn. But I want her to have a good grasp of fundamentals and understand how each function of the camera affects the other.

JJ
I totally agree with that plan.
09-05-2020, 04:31 AM - 1 Like   #27
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I think it is safe to say many photographers learned on film, likely on something as simple as the venerable K-1000. I love that camera, it produces a great image, if one takes the time to get the settings right before opening the shutter. Using a K-1000, a light meter, and having only 12, 24, or 36 chances at success formed a lot of good habits that stuck with me into the digital age.

Last edited by robgski; 09-05-2020 at 05:43 PM.
09-05-2020, 10:34 AM   #28
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In addition to the fundamentals of the camera operation, I think that learning how the various camera parameters affect the character of the image (such as shutter speed affecting the look of a mountain stream water flow), in combination with aspects like composition, view point, light direction and color, etc., develops the joy of being able to capture an image that is satisfying. Getting the image that you wanted, which motivates further pursuit of photography.

I got a lot from Brian Peterson's 1988 (film, of course) "Learning To See Creatively", and a more recent book, Brenda Tharp's 2010 revised edition "Creative Nature & Outdoor Photography", which has explanations of the use of camera settings mixed right in with the whole range of creative aspects of capturing the desired image.
09-05-2020, 07:46 PM   #29
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Iíll when I started shooting, I would carry a Pentax P30t and a Yashica Mat 124g twin reflex. I agree the Yashica would make me think about my shots because I only had 12 shots per roll of film! I did have a built-in light meter, but manual aperture and manual focus. Double-checked everything before I hit that shutter button! But that camera could take some beautiful landscape photos!
09-05-2020, 09:05 PM   #30
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QuoteOriginally posted by officiousbystander Quote
Tom Ang's How to Photograph Absolutely Everything is terrific for getting a person out taking photos without worrying too much about technical aspects. You have to start somewhere and this is full of great ideas and examples.
I wholeheartedly agree with this. Tom Ang does a very good job with explanations, using straightforward language and good illustrations.
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