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07-05-2007, 12:49 PM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by ChrisA Quote
I've read this thread with great interest, and as others, am indebted to John for taking the trouble to explain things like this.

I have about 5000 colour negatives to digitise, all 35mm in strips of 4-6, and I'm thinking of getting the Nikon Coolscan V ED.

My question is, how automated is it possible to get the process, if ultimate quality is not the issue, but absence of dust marks is a requirement?

My situation is that I have the negs, but not the prints, so I don't really know what I have, other than 20+ years of memories. Ideally, I'd like to be able to feed the machine a strip of negs every few minutes, and have it do virtually everything itself in the first instance, while I get on with my other work. And then later on, go through the image files it had produced.

I'd then go back and rescan the good ones, and spend a lot more effort getting them right.

Is this a realistic expectation?
Sorry, There is very little automation on the Ved. It has a film strip reader/transport--6 frames--and I think it can be automated, but that is the extent of the automation.

There is not a lot going for film scanning automation--unless you have long sequences of essentially the same subject/same light/same exposure. It's very much a one by one thing. About the best one can do is get into a rhythm; and then it still requires fast decision making and fast mouse and keyboard entry to set the parameters. I figured on doing one box of 36 exposures per night-say from 6 to 9 pm, on average.

If what you really need is bulk scanning, then a flatbed with an adapter is the path to follow. You can always return to any particular negative and re-scan at maximum scanner potential. The high-end Epson flatbeds are probably the best on the market for this task--but I'm biased as an owner.

07-06-2007, 01:22 AM   #17
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QuoteOriginally posted by jfdavis58 Quote
Sorry, There is very little automation on the Ved. It has a film strip reader/transport--6 frames--and I think it can be automated, but that is the extent of the automation.
Ok, sorry to seem a bit dim; could you explain the workflow please? What is the extent of the automation that the VED provides? If you feed it a six frame strip, does it produce 6 images that you then have to do enhancement on, or do you have to tell it to scan each one, one at a time, and then do the dust removal etc?

Also, does the machine try to remove dust from the strip at all? Or is dust removal solely done in software?

Sorry to hassle you with all these questions - I really want to avoid making a large investment in the wrong equipment. Thanks again.

QuoteQuote:
It's very much a one by one thing. About the best one can do is get into a rhythm; and then it still requires fast decision making and fast mouse and keyboard entry to set the parameters. I figured on doing one box of 36 exposures per night-say from 6 to 9 pm, on average.
Ok, point taken.

QuoteQuote:
If what you really need is bulk scanning, then a flatbed with an adapter is the path to follow. You can always return to any particular negative and re-scan at maximum scanner potential. The high-end Epson flatbeds are probably the best on the market for this task--but I'm biased as an owner.
Hey, bias is fine - indeed desirable, with the experience you've had of this.

Which Epson would you recommend?
07-09-2007, 09:35 PM   #18
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I agree with the recommendation to use Ed Hamrick's Vuescan software. It works much better than the driver that came with my slide scanner or my flatbed scanner. You can download a trial copy and play with it before buying.

I have a Minolta Dimage SpeedScan - very old but I'm happy with the results. However, I'm one of those who has only scanned hundreds, not thousands, of slides, so I'm sure I have a lot to learn.

One of the biggest time consumers for me was cleaning dust off the slides or negatives. My slide scanner doesn't have any newfangled automatic dust detection technology, so I used a blower and a camel hair brush under a bright light. It would sometimes take several scans to find and remove the dust I missed. I was scanning astrophotos - dark images with bright stars and nebula, where a spec of dust on the slide was very noticeable and could obscure a critical piece of detail.
09-10-2014, 07:46 PM   #19
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the above threads are very helpful, albeit dated.....does anyone have a fresh opinion, given the advances in scanner technology? I have 2000 35mm mounted velvia slides to digitise...ta

09-11-2014, 07:30 PM - 1 Like   #20
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I've digitized about 600 slides from my mother in law of my wife as a little girl growing up. My setup is a K-30 with a D FA 50mm f/2.8 macro lens with an Accura slide holder adapted to fit 49mm filter threads. Shooting in RAW, I can get very sharp "scans". The biggest challenge is the dynamic range. It is very compressed. The shadows can be very dark and the highlights are brighter than bright. You need to be ready to do some post processing on an individual basis for each slide to expand the apparent dynamic range. Once you figure out the formula then it's not tedious. I spend about 5 to 10 minutes per slide. It sounds like a lot when summed for a huge number of slide but it's a trip down memory lane. I did a little bit at a time and I think the effort was worth it.

I find that 16MP is the perfect resolution for digitizing 135 film. Going any higher would simply bring out more detail in the grain (especially negatives). I think a higher resolution would be useful for 120 film.
09-12-2014, 07:17 PM   #21
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thanks Boris...
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