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06-04-2014, 11:00 AM   #1
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RICOH IMAGING EXPANDS THEIR PENTAX LINE OF BINOCULARS WITH TWO NEW MODELS. Compact, l

News update from the official Pentax website:

Denver, Co. May 28, 2014 – Ricoh Imaging Americas Corporation , a leader in precision sport optics, is pleased to announce the expansion of their longstanding and award winning comprehensive binocular line-up. The PENTAX PCF CW series porro-prism binoculars follow a classic design that deliver stunning optical performance. This new binocular series includes the PFC CW 8x30 and the PCF CW 10x30 ...

Pentax news announcement: http://www.us.ricoh-imaging.com/about/press/333


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06-04-2014, 04:14 PM   #2
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Good news for birders. Not so much for astronomers, cause of small aperture (in astro, aperture is the diameter of frontal lens, in case someone don't know).
06-04-2014, 04:17 PM   #3
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Do people do astronomy with binoculars? I thought the magnification wasn't enough (and the aperture).
06-04-2014, 11:22 PM   #4
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Yep. It,s the first instrument, to learn the sky, to do orientation, and even to see some deep sky objects, under clear sky. For example, the best tool to observ the great Andromeda Galaxy M31 is a big binoculars, because of the big size of the this object.

06-06-2014, 01:02 AM   #5
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I'm gonna have a look at these. I'm currently debating whether to get some really big astronomy binos or something to fit into the coat pocket. Currently I only got an 10x50 that would be nice for astronomy if it could be fitted to a tripod but definitely doesn't fit a pocket.

Last edited by mano; 06-06-2014 at 01:02 AM. Reason: Typo
06-06-2014, 04:06 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by mano Quote
I'm gonna have a look at these. I'm currently debating whether to get some really big astronomy binos or something to fit into the coat pocket. Currently I only got an 10x50 that would be nice for astronomy if it could be fitted to a tripod but definitely doesn't fit a pocket.
Depending on your local light pollution level, there are a tremendous number of deep-sky objects visible in your 10x50s. I use this size hand-held alongside my telescope to help locating objects I'm after. I'm not one to discourage anyone from adding more glass to their collection, but I'd recommended first obtaining a good sky atlas and begin exploring with what you already have.

Good luck.
06-06-2014, 04:58 PM   #7
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I also own a 10x50. In my town is almost useless for deepsky. I can't see more than M42 and sometimes the center of M31. But if I go to the mountains, higher than 5000 feet, is a different story.
06-11-2014, 06:29 AM   #8
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QuoteOriginally posted by Nakedgun Quote
Depending on your local light pollution level, there are a tremendous number of deep-sky objects visible in your 10x50s. I use this size hand-held alongside my telescope to help locating objects I'm after. I'm not one to discourage anyone from adding more glass to their collection, but I'd recommended first obtaining a good sky atlas and begin exploring with what you already have.

Good luck.
You are of course right about the optical performance of my 10x50, the only thing missing for me is a tripod mount, I'd really like a steadier picture. Yes, there are adapters but these 80mm aperture glasses look really interesting .

But I'm currently leaning towards a compact glass anyway, as the sky maps I bought last year are gathering dust currently...

06-11-2014, 07:06 AM   #9
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10X binoculars are very difficult to hand hold steadily enough to realize what can be seen with them in the night sky. Fitting a 10X50 to a tripod for the first time is often a revelation to casual night-sky enthusiasts. However, binoculars on a tripod can be painful on your neck. Here's an alternative. Purchase a cheap inflatable boat, one of the vinyl units that can hold one or two people. Inflate a bit soft, not real tight. Set it in the yard at night, lie down, head cushioned at one end and elbows braced against the sides while holding the binoculars. Some adjustment to inflation, possibly a pillow behind your head, you'll eventually find a comfortable viewing position that provides steadiness almost as good as a tripod. Consider a blanket or even a comforter or sleeping bag to keep warm. Some people run out a cord and lie under an electric blanket. For viewing stars, high magnification is not a big advantage. For viewing planets, high magnification is a must, but generally too high for hand-holding even when braced as described. And BTW, there's no sight for a beginner that can compete with Saturn's rings (minimum magnification probably about 15X - spotting scopes with 45 degree eyepieces are much better than binoculars).
06-11-2014, 12:14 PM   #10
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I own 1670 binocs and found 109 of the 110 Messier objects in the sky (galaxy M91, too faint). The best & brightest star clusters, nebulae and galaxies made Charles Messier's list, and it's fun to see them all at the same low-power scale. That said, my wife really wants stabilized binoculars for herself, so where's the SR binox RicoPentax? (yes they'd need in-lens IS, perhaps anathema around here )
06-11-2014, 12:30 PM   #11
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Sitting (leaning back) in a portable canvas chair with the tripod leg height adjusted lower than standing height makes night viewing much more pleasant. It makes horizontal DAY viewing more pleasant!!
06-11-2014, 12:37 PM   #12
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QuoteOriginally posted by jimr-pdx Quote
I own 1670 binocs and found 109 of the 110 Messier objects in the sky (galaxy M91, too faint). The best & brightest star clusters, nebulae and galaxies made Charles Messier's list, and it's fun to see them all at the same low-power scale. That said, my wife really wants stabilized binoculars for herself, so where's the SR binox RicoPentax? (yes they'd need in-lens IS, perhaps anathema around here )
I don't know if is usable, but an idea just cross my mind. What is you couple the binoculars with a camera video stabilizer, like this:

Pro Steadycam Handheld Video Stabilizer for Digital Cameras, SLR's & Camcorders | eBay
06-11-2014, 12:54 PM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by jimr-pdx Quote
... That said, my wife really wants stabilized binoculars for herself, so where's the SR binox RicoPentax? (yes they'd need in-lens IS, perhaps anathema around here )
Are you kidding? What they need to do is to develop a neural implant to manipulate the extraocular muscles for the ultimate in-body image stabilization system imaginable.
06-11-2014, 05:52 PM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by aremmes Quote
Are you kidding? What they need to do is to develop a neural implant to manipulate the extraocular muscles for the ultimate in-body image stabilization system imaginable.
Quite true - since sensor-shift IS would require surgery, I'm hoping Ricoh would go for in-lens instead
06-12-2014, 12:02 AM - 1 Like   #15
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Binocular mounting options BinocularSky - Mounting Binoculars for Astronomy
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