Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
06-14-2012, 05:36 AM - 1 Like   #1
Forum Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 90
Real Estate Photography
Lens: 10-20mm Sigma Camera: Pentax K-r Photo Location: Chatham, MA ISO: 400 Shutter Speed: 1/60s Aperture: F9.5 

Been doing some real estate photography and found it necesary to learn HDR due to the situations where the outside is bright and the inside is dark, this was my first attempt at this. These pictures were either 5 or 7 exposures and yes, it was necesary to capture this much detail. All critiques welcome as I am trying to improve. Thanks

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
 Photo 
View Picture EXIF
 Photo 
View Picture EXIF
 Photo 
View Picture EXIF
 Photo 
View Picture EXIF
 Photo 
06-14-2012, 06:06 AM - 1 Like   #2
Senior Member
Lex Madera's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Virginia, Austria, Ukraine
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 188
I think the photos are great. nice job.

I'm not real pleased with the finish work on the ceiling in the kitchen, though. ;-)
06-14-2012, 06:19 AM - 1 Like   #3
MSL
Pentaxian
MSL's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Greater Toronto Area
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,518
I know nothing of real estate photography (and even less about doing HDR) but you have capture the room details well, and I can see why you needed HDR. Following up on Lex Madera's comment, if you can go back to the house it would be good to check if things like the ceiling really do look like the do in the image or if there are some lighting/shadow effects causing some of the bumps in the finishing job.
06-14-2012, 06:22 AM - 1 Like   #4
Pentaxian
aurele's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Paris, France
Photos: Albums
Posts: 3,191
i'm not in real estate business and i do almost never some shots like these, so my point of view may not be the best ...

But ! i found that the kitchen and more generally wooden furniture are maybe too catchy to the eye. Maybe reduce a very little color contrast.

On the other hand, outdoor picture are really really good.

06-14-2012, 06:33 AM   #5
Forum Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 90
Original Poster
I am also a carpenter, I agree with the ceiling assessment however I think it will b a photoshop blend on this one after I check with the listing agent. I will play with the contrast a bit
06-14-2012, 07:26 AM - 2 Likes   #6
Veteran Member




Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Minneapolis
Photos: Albums
Posts: 587
Even though HDR will get you the necessary detail, your white balance is different in different parts of the room. You'd be well served to use off-camera flash to light dark areas and gel them to get a more consistent white balance.

I'd also be more mindful of the edges of the frame -
#1 half a picture frame on the left
#2 has part of a hutch, part of a chair, some white thing on the left, and a chair in the upper right corner.
#4 part of a window frame.

I assume you are using a tripod to get all these consecutive exposures - plenty of opportunity to clear the edges of the shot.


Regarding distortion -

particularly in #2 and #4, if you're going to leave the hutch and window frame, at least correct the distortion in post so they are vertical
the pool shot is quite distorted, with the umbrellas and house all tipping in to the center. That is easily corrected in PS, no reason not to.

Here's the pool shot with distortion corrected and WB set off the white trim on the house. I suspect you'll find, as I did, that the 10-20 isn't very useful at 10mm for architecture. You're better off shooting at 12mm, which is about the equivalent field of view once you correct the distortion at 10mm.


Last edited by grainbelt; 06-14-2012 at 07:40 AM.
06-14-2012, 07:46 AM - 1 Like   #7
Pentaxian
johnyates's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Saskatoon, SK
Photos: Albums
Posts: 1,276
You might want to join this Flickr group: Flickr: Photography for Real Estate for members' critiques.
06-14-2012, 09:18 AM   #8
Forum Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 90
Original Poster
Excellent, each critique has been most useful I will utilize them before I send in my finals this is a new job for me, so thank u to all! Cheers

06-14-2012, 12:40 PM - 1 Like   #9
Veteran Member




Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Central Kentucky
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,415
QuoteOriginally posted by Lex Madera Quote
I think the photos are great. nice job.

I'm not real pleased with the finish work on the ceiling in the kitchen, though. ;-)

It does look like amateur hour on the drywall repair after they cut out a square to add a couple of new lights.
06-15-2012, 03:51 AM - 1 Like   #10
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
bezuidar's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Centurion, South Africa
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 375
Very.very nice pics indeed. Hard to fault. Well done!
06-15-2012, 06:11 AM - 1 Like   #11
Veteran Member




Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: London, Canada
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 346
Must be nice to be rich. You didn't say what you used for the HDR conversion. Photomatix is very popular. It has presets to get you in the ballpark but they can be tweaked as needed. As an observation I'm not sure the grunge look is suitable for a high end home. As photography enthusiasts we look at things in a different light from a home buyer. You want it to look clean and fresh but it has made the whites (ceiling) look dirty and well, grungey. The debates rage between those who like the effect and those who hate it. Since the purpose of the photos is to sell the house this type of process might turn off a potential buyer. You want the detail and such to show but I'd use a more subdued, natural setting. I agree with grainbelt about things creeping into the edges of the frame. This just reminded me of shots I did for a builder of his high end homes about 25 years ago on slides. It would have been nice to have had a digital camera back then.
02-24-2015, 03:52 AM   #12
Moderator
Nass's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: The British Isles
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,400
Old thread, but I'm searching for real estate threads so came across this and felt the need to comment.

I don't like these shots, they look unnatural. Also, they'd look better if the interior lights were on, and if the converging parallels had been corrected. In the first shot I would have moved the table, chairs and rug forward to make them less dominant. In the second, the 1/4 chair arm is unnecessary and the foot of the chair reaches the edge of the frame so I think you should have framed it differently and moved some stuff. The 4th one has one chair sticking out unnecessarily and it should have been moved forward in line with the rest.
02-24-2015, 04:06 AM   #13
PEG Moderator
Loyal Site Supporter
Kerrowdown's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Hielands o' Scootlund....... "Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand"..............William Blake
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 41,194
QuoteOriginally posted by Nass Quote
Old thread
You got me going on this one too... my comments are just to maybe make other folk more mindful should they get involved with this kind of photography in the future.

Aye as others have already said... you maybe need to maybe slow down a bit and watch those verticals (horizontals must be overlooked either ), whilst they can be corrected in post it, helps if you get them almost there in camera.

Also the compositions, always remove the bits and pieces especially around on the edges of the frame that don't actually add to the image.

Last edited by Kerrowdown; 02-24-2015 at 04:11 AM.
02-27-2015, 12:59 AM   #14
Veteran Member
Scootatheschool1990's Avatar

Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Boise Idaho
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 466
Interesting. Have you considered flash? I've found flash to be very realistic! I love flash. In addition to an even white balanace, I've found the colors to be accurate. I'm even considering a $trobe because I love lighting so much much!
02-27-2015, 06:35 AM   #15
Loyal Site Supporter
Loyal Site Supporter
onlineflyer's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Ohio
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 1,498
Nice shots. I don't know if it's me but the 4th photo appears to show imperfection in the ceiling. As a potential buyer, I would be concerned about past water damage. On line photos can influence what properties buyers look at.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
critique, estate, photography
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lens for real estate photography Workingdog Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 25 03-07-2012 07:49 AM
real estate photography help? Unregistered User Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 32 09-11-2011 01:19 PM
Misc Real-estate Photography Unregistered User Photo Critique 13 02-25-2011 10:29 PM
Has anyone done real estate photography before? jennverr Photographic Technique 19 02-02-2011 07:17 AM
What is the best ultra wide lens for real estate photography? HermanLee Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 17 11-07-2010 11:54 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:52 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top