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04-08-2016, 09:56 PM   #1
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Found this beautiful flower in my dentist's atrium.
Lens: Nikon 28~105mm D Lens Camera: Nikon D70 Photo Location: Beaverton, Oregon ISO: 200 Shutter Speed: 1/60s Aperture: F5.6 

A very nice surprise to find this beautiful array of incredibly gorgeous flowers in my dentist's waiting room. After my appointment I went and retrieved my equipment and returned. Now, really, how many people do you know that have actually returned to their dentist a few minutes after the appointment? Anyway this was a fun shoot and there are few more I have to upload. Thanks for looking.

Tonytee

My wife has just informed me that this is a Bromeliad Flower.

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Last edited by Tonytee; 04-08-2016 at 10:43 PM. Reason: Additional Information
04-09-2016, 11:58 AM   #2
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
A very nice surprise to find this beautiful array of incredibly gorgeous flowers in my dentist's waiting room. After my appointment I went and retrieved my equipment and returned. Now, really, how many people do you know that have actually returned to their dentist a few minutes after the appointment? Anyway this was a fun shoot and there are few more I have to upload. Thanks for looking.

Tonytee

My wife has just informed me that this is a Bromeliad Flower.
Beautiful flower and nice picture Tonytee. Though I observe something that I want to comment here and would like somebody else from the forum to response. It is that the red (or orange) color of the petals seems to be melted, not showing the edges or details on them. In my experience I have noticed this in lots of photographs mainly with that color and in a minor degree with yellow. Many times it has been difficult for me to focus on these surfaces (I like to do it manually) to see the details that in the picture disappear. In this photo that is very evident. Can someone give some answer to my comment? Thanks.
04-09-2016, 12:34 PM   #3
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Sometimes the camera sensor has difficulty with those colors and oversaturates them, resulting in loss of detail.
04-09-2016, 03:32 PM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by JoseFF Quote
Beautiful flower and nice picture Tonytee. Though I observe something that I want to comment here and would like somebody else from the forum to response. It is that the red (or orange) color of the petals seems to be melted, not showing the edges or details on them. In my experience I have noticed this in lots of photographs mainly with that color and in a minor degree with yellow. Many times it has been difficult for me to focus on these surfaces (I like to do it manually) to see the details that in the picture disappear. In this photo that is very evident. Can someone give some answer to my comment? Thanks.
Actually, I can answer your question, and it is a very good question. I have discovered the hard way that the Nikon D70 has what is known as, "Limited Dynamic Range." Meaning that some colors such as (and especially) the red and yellow channels. On occasion when the conditions are not perfect, the color brown is a problem for the Nikon D70. The D70 also has issues with metering. I discovered this issue when I had taken photographs on the Oregon Coast and then uploaded them into my computer, only to find just about all of them were grossly overexposed. Well, live and learn. Just about every digital camera of this era, early 2000s had these problems. I am considering an upgrade. Very good observation and again a very good question.

Thanks,

Tonytee

04-10-2016, 09:20 AM   #5
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Tonytee, it's good to see another shooter using a "vintage DSLR". I shoot with my old *ist D a lot, especially with Takumars. I believe it has the same Sony 6mp sensor as your D70, with the same shortcomings, but also the same glorious colors Be sure to hang onto it, even if you upgrade - there are some things these older CCD bodies can do, that the new ones can't
04-10-2016, 03:52 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by paulh Quote
Tonytee, it's good to see another shooter using a "vintage DSLR". I shoot with my old *ist D a lot, especially with Takumars. I believe it has the same Sony 6mp sensor as your D70, with the same shortcomings, but also the same glorious colors Be sure to hang onto it, even if you upgrade - there are some things these older CCD bodies can do, that the new ones can't
Hello and thank you for your kind words. I was planning on donating the D70, however after your encouragement to hold on to it, I believe I will. I am planning on returning to shoot these flowers again, with my Pentax K100D Super. I will be sure to post them here for observation and comparison. Should be fun and interesting. Thanks again, Tonytee.
04-11-2016, 02:44 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
Actually, I can answer your question, and it is a very good question. I have discovered the hard way that the Nikon D70 has what is known as, "Limited Dynamic Range." Meaning that some colors such as (and especially) the red and yellow channels. On occasion when the conditions are not perfect, the color brown is a problem for the Nikon D70. The D70 also has issues with metering. I discovered this issue when I had taken photographs on the Oregon Coast and then uploaded them into my computer, only to find just about all of them were grossly overexposed. Well, live and learn. Just about every digital camera of this era, early 2000s had these problems. I am considering an upgrade. Very good observation and again a very good question.

Thanks,

Tonytee
Your answer doesn´t leave room for doubts. Thank you Tonytee.
04-11-2016, 02:47 PM   #8
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If you underexpose reds and yellows you'll find they don't blow the colors out.

04-11-2016, 10:15 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady95 Quote
If you underexpose reds and yellows you'll find they don't blow the colors out.
Good tip, thank you.

Tony
04-12-2016, 07:08 AM   #10
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Like this one.



If you check my flickr you'll find a few red and yellow flowers I've shot that I underexposed to keep the red and yellow intact.
04-12-2016, 04:07 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by photolady95 Quote
Like this one.



If you check my flickr you'll find a few red and yellow flowers I've shot that I underexposed to keep the red and yellow intact.
Wonderful example, thanks for your input.

Tony

---------- Post added 04-12-16 at 04:12 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Tonytee Quote
Actually, I can answer your question, and it is a very good question. I have discovered the hard way that the Nikon D70 has what is known as, "Limited Dynamic Range." Meaning that some colors such as (and especially) the red and yellow channels. On occasion when the conditions are not perfect, the color brown is a problem for the Nikon D70. The D70 also has issues with metering. I discovered this issue when I had taken photographs on the Oregon Coast and then uploaded them into my computer, only to find just about all of them were grossly overexposed. Well, live and learn. Just about every digital camera of this era, early 2000s had these problems. I am considering an upgrade. Very good observation and again a very good question.

Thanks,

Tonytee

To comment even further, the problem with the Nikon D70 was exacerbated by having to use the onboard flash. However, without the flash, there would have been no photo. So, six of one and half a dozen of another on which way to go. I think it is a nice affect anyway. Thanks to everyone for all the helpful suggestions.

Tonytee
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