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09-01-2018, 10:55 AM   #16
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
I don't think anyone would want to reverse engineer a 1260 bit PROM chip.
Of course not!

But time ago I read about some people trying to do "Arquelogic" in the old intel processor:
Reversing Interl 4004

Your picture, really amazing

09-01-2018, 05:25 PM   #17
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This is coming from thirty year old memories, but multiple polarized light sources can give you some pretty neat effects on this type of product shot.

Great shot, though, and you can have a lot of fun playing with it.
09-02-2018, 10:41 AM   #18
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QuoteOriginally posted by Dr Goodglass Quote
his is coming from thirty year old memories, but multiple polarized light sources can give you some pretty neat effects on this type of product shot.
I might have to play around with that the next time I shoot some chips. Didn't even occur to me to do so but it makes sense hearing it from another.
10-18-2019, 05:20 AM   #19
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
Here we have a 2:1 macro shot cropped to show a single old microchip still on wafer. The chip is about 4mm on the long edge and is a programmable read only memory (PROM).
The shot was taken with a reverse mounted 28mm SMC takumar illuminated by the warm CFL kitchen lights above.
Exposure time was 30 seconds.
The image was cropped to show one full chip.


This chip dates to about 1971 or 1972 and has a feature size of 5um or 7um. This is about 1000 times larger than today's best semiconductors that will pack in about a million transistors in the area that one transistor here takes up. There are 20 rows of 63 transistors here for a total storage capacity of 1260 bits. The traces you see are actually aluminum and when photographed with a flash were the expected shiny silver color but the detail for the layers got lost when photographed with a flash so the overhead kitchen light was used instead. No trade secrets or patents exposed here as they have all long expired.
Well done!

10-18-2019, 11:44 AM   #20
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My only critique is that DOF seems a little shallow, the upper side of the targeted chip seems slightly out of focus. But otherwise it's great, I love the color and as you noted, macro of something other than bugs or flowers is nice to see.
10-18-2019, 12:20 PM   #21
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QuoteOriginally posted by Archimedes the Dog Quote
that DOF seems a little shallow
Not being perfectly parallel to the subject at 2:1 macro will do that even with the lens stopped down to f/8 (f/24 effective for light gathering and diffraction purposes). Focus stacking is really the only way to solve this problem and not have a huge issue with diffraction but with a reverse mounted lens one would have to have a focusing rail with fine control which I do not. I keep thinking I should get one but never get around to it.
10-18-2019, 12:26 PM   #22
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
Not being perfectly parallel to the subject at 2:1 macro will do that even with the lens stopped down to f/8 (f/24 effective for light gathering and diffraction purposes). Focus stacking is really the only way to solve this problem and not have a huge issue with diffraction but with a reverse mounted lens one would have to have a focusing rail with fine control which I do not. I keep thinking I should get one but never get around to it.
You've definitely inspired me to get out my FA 100mm Macro and shoot something other than flowers and bugs.

Last edited by Archimedes the Dog; 10-18-2019 at 01:33 PM.
10-18-2019, 12:45 PM   #23
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
Not being perfectly parallel to the subject at 2:1 macro will do that even with the lens stopped down to f/8 (f/24 effective for light gathering and diffraction purposes). Focus stacking is really the only way to solve this problem and not have a huge issue with diffraction but with a reverse mounted lens one would have to have a focusing rail with fine control which I do not. I keep thinking I should get one but never get around to it.
I was going to suggest focus stacking and then found that there's a second page ...

There may be a chance still without a macro rail, to get something usable. I'm not sure about how you set up your tripod (assuming it is a tripod), but you can have two fairly steep legs, not extended and footed perpendicular to your optical axis and use the 3rd fairly far spread and extended to 'rotate' your camera in fine increments around that line, e.g. by adding layers of paper/cardboard underneath the 3rd leg. It's likely to produce some unwanted lateral movement as well, but e.g. the free CombineZP is able to compensate that. The slightly different angle of view will likely not cause trouble for this rather 'shallow' subject.

10-19-2019, 02:05 PM   #24
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Love it but those specs are little bit distracting. Could they be puffed away with a blower - or even removed in post?
10-23-2019, 06:14 AM   #25
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
Not being perfectly parallel to the subject at 2:1 macro will do that even with the lens stopped down to f/8 (f/24 effective for light gathering and diffraction purposes). Focus stacking is really the only way to solve this problem and not have a huge issue with diffraction but with a reverse mounted lens one would have to have a focusing rail with fine control which I do not. I keep thinking I should get one but never get around to it.
A rail is totally worth it. Even if you aren't stacking, it makes focusing so much easier with higher magnification setups.

As I'm sure you've noticed, with a shiny flat thing like this lighting is often much easier if your camera isn't parallel to the subject. Having the tools to stack means you are no longer at the mercy of DoF limitations, skirting your way around physics is liberating.

Great subject, and I hope to see more.
10-23-2019, 06:42 AM - 1 Like   #26
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QuoteOriginally posted by BrianR Quote
A rail is totally worth it
That is one of the many things on the list of gear I want to get that would offer tangible benefits that would be decoupled from the person behind the camera. Other things like a good ring flash, and a good big German equatorial mount are also on that list.
11-21-2019, 01:28 PM   #27
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QuoteOriginally posted by MossyRocks Quote
Here we have a 2:1 macro shot cropped to show a single old microchip still on wafer. The chip is about 4mm on the long edge and is a programmable read only memory (PROM).
The shot was taken with a reverse mounted 28mm SMC takumar illuminated by the warm CFL kitchen lights above.
Exposure time was 30 seconds.
The image was cropped to show one full chip.


This chip dates to about 1971 or 1972 and has a feature size of 5um or 7um. This is about 1000 times larger than today's best semiconductors that will pack in about a million transistors in the area that one transistor here takes up. There are 20 rows of 63 transistors here for a total storage capacity of 1260 bits. The traces you see are actually aluminum and when photographed with a flash were the expected shiny silver color but the detail for the layers got lost when photographed with a flash so the overhead kitchen light was used instead. No trade secrets or patents exposed here as they have all long expired.
At first glance I thought it was an aerial of fields. But, no! It's a field of flip-flops! Cool.
11-21-2019, 01:41 PM   #28
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QuoteOriginally posted by Pknot Quote
t's a field of flip-flops! Cool
I don't think there are any flilp-flops there as it was a PROM, not RAM chip. I don't know much about chip design to be able to identify features beyond what transistors and traces look like so if there was a flip-flop or two there I wouldn't recognize them.
11-23-2019, 10:37 AM   #29
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nice.
11-23-2019, 12:51 PM   #30
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That image takes me back, and I like the composition.
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