Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
01-06-2021, 01:17 PM - 1 Like   #1
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Lothian
Posts: 9
Woods exposure
Lens: 16-85mm Camera: K3 Photo Location: Scottish Borders ISO: 400 Shutter Speed: 1/200s Aperture: F6.3 

Hi folks,

Wondering if you can help with this.


Being in lockdown that I expect to go on for some time, and restricted to about 5 miles radius travel, I'm lucky there are plenty of woods to explore. Gives me a chance to take exercise too, so I'm pretty sure most times I'll be shooting handheld. Clearly exposure's always going to be an issue in woods, so I'd be grateful to get tips on how to improve my technique in these locations. BTW I used what I hope was double distance AF focusing

Forecast is for plenty of freezing fog over the next few days, so advice on pp would be helpful too.

Thanks in advance

Ian

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-3  Photo 
01-06-2021, 01:50 PM   #2
dms
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,089
Here I think you need to decide what you want to capture.

— For the trees/ground to have texture I would have either used incident meter, and use the indicated exposure. Or reflected light (camera spot metering) and meter the snow in the foreground and increase the reading by 2 to 3 stops. (I would use 2 1/2 first time). You could also try metering the trees trunks and reducing exposure 2-3 stops, but that is tougher to do as the areas blend the further they are away.

— If you want to base it on the light and want the trees to go dark (moody)—I would spot meter the clear sky (on mid left) and increase the reading by 2 to 3 stops. I probably would start here with 2 stops for the sky, and see from the image what to do next time.

-- You could also try a mid way exposure of the above methods. If they were 1/250s and 1/30s (at same lens aperture) then 1/90s. (1/250 to 1/125 to [mid pt here] to 1/60 to 1/30).

As an explanation metering tries to make the metered area a grey midtone (reflectance about 12%), but you want them to look light—so increasing for snow 2 -3 stops put it at about 50% to 100% reflectance—which is right for fresh snow (12% + 2 stops = 48%, 12% + 3 stops = 96%). Similalry for the sky, although now simply 2-3 stops makes it bright w/ some texture (if there was any—but anyway enveloping but not too bright).
01-06-2021, 03:24 PM   #3
dms
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,089
BTW I think the exposure you made is good. It is probably ideal in capturing the range of tones--if you meant to split the difference between the darkest and lightest tones.

But in general, for such a scene, depending on where you metered and how much sky vs. foreground, it can be tricky--hence my suggestions (they have nothing to do with metering the entire scene).

The rest (post capture) is about pp. e.g., do you want to see texture in the trees (it may not be there/be too noisy), how much contrast, how bright do you want the sky, etc.
01-06-2021, 06:57 PM   #4
MSL
Pentaxian
MSL's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Greater Toronto Area
Photos: Albums
Posts: 4,172
There are two aspects of the image that bother me the most and I'll focus on those. One is the blown highlights in the background. @dms has discussed metering in detail and better than I could. The other, though is that the composition doesn't tell a story. I don't know what part of the forest you want me to focus on. Is it the trees on the right, the log on the ground or the bright light in the distance? Is it just the overall moodiness? Nothing seems to be in sharp focus.

I offer up a couple of threads I've posted recently, also of a wooded area where I've been able to escape for a few minutes now and then. I don't claim any of these to be brilliant, but whether it was the vertical feel of the trees, the snow on the trees, or some that were bent or broken, I think the focal point of each image comes across.
Lost in the woods - PentaxForums.com
LBA lessons in the woods - PentaxForums.com

01-07-2021, 05:37 PM   #5
dms
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New York, NY
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 2,089
I do hope you don't mind, but MSL 2nd comment led me to look again at your image--and I would think a strong crop as I have done--may be constructive.
Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-3  Photo 
01-09-2021, 01:03 AM   #6
Pentaxian




Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bolton, Greater Manchester
Posts: 460
I too hope you don't mind me playing with your image. This what I came up with...



The dead tree, pointing towards the light, showing a little about its demise.

Thanks for the exposure info dms, something for me to think about
01-09-2021, 11:29 AM   #7
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Lothian
Posts: 9
Original Poster
Thanks all

It's always good to get constructive feedback.

For general info this image was straight out of camera being converted only to jpeg for posting. It was probably my first intended misty woods shoot and the snow added further considerations to the exposure. I was particularly struck that the highlights were SO blown out as the picture was taken facing east approx noon and the area concerned did not appear so bright IRL, especially as the light, such as there was, came essentially from the south or right as one looks at it.

I suspect it'd be useful to plan a bit further ahead, carry the tripod, use my light meter, and use a grad, or bracket to facilitate post, where there's such a range of light.

Your thoughts and examples on composition also set me thinking. I tend to be a bit old school and try to get things right in camera inc. keeping crops to a minimum and I'll use the pics from this day's shoot as sketches for the next time I head to these woods especially on a foggy day.
Went to a different wood yesterday with all this in mind and came away with a good few potential keepers.

Once again, thanks for your tips, comments, and ideas.
01-09-2021, 05:42 PM   #8
MSL
Pentaxian
MSL's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Greater Toronto Area
Photos: Albums
Posts: 4,172
QuoteOriginally posted by SimonC Quote
The dead tree, pointing towards the light, showing a little about its demise.
I played around a bit and came up with something similar. I agree that the dead tree on the ground is a natural focus.
QuoteOriginally posted by Scotianphotos Quote
For general info this image was straight out of camera being converted only to jpeg for posting. It was probably my first intended misty woods shoot and the snow added further considerations to the exposure. I was particularly struck that the highlights were SO blown out as the picture was taken facing east approx noon and the area concerned did not appear so bright IRL, especially as the light, such as there was, came essentially from the south or right as one looks at it.

I'm using a K-5 rather than a K-3 so I don't know which has bigger dynamic range. I know both allow a fair amount of correction out of camera, but it is still easy to blow highlights and this is a lot harder to fix than areas that are almost, but not quite, black. So when shooting in tough lighting I'll use a +/- bracket. In theory this shouldn't matter much, but I have had surprising cases where the underexposed image might have a little more DOF and I can fix the lighting in PP, while the correctly metered photo is less compelling. I have also found that sometimes while the light balance doesn't change, the specific color channels do. So even though it is then more work to delete a bunch of somewhat similar images, I will still use it in situations like this where the snow and strong light and fog make the lighting challenging.

01-20-2021, 02:45 PM   #9
Pentaxian
ChristianRock's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: People's Republic of America
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 7,868
The flare makes me think you might have had some condensation on the lens? Also, I would have exposed about a stop less, and would have lifted the shadows in PP.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
critique, photography, plenty, woods
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long exposure looks like multi-exposure Paul the Sunman General Photography 13 01-03-2017 09:43 PM
A typically manual exposure guy trying out Program exposure mode goatsNdonkey Photographic Technique 9 06-23-2016 07:16 PM
K-3 Exposure Button Stuck After Rain Exposure soroush Pentax K-3 & K-3 II 13 03-24-2015 09:20 AM
HDR/Multi-exposure/Exposure Bracketing sany Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 4 04-24-2011 08:52 PM
Night photography with K10D - High ISO short exposure VS Low ISO long exposure pw-pix Pentax DSLR Discussion 10 02-03-2008 01:37 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:01 AM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top