Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
08-05-2021, 01:50 PM   #1
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,781
Yam Vine In A Lady's Window
Lens: SMC Pentax-A Macro f:2.8 100mm Camera: K-1 ii Photo Location: Family Window ISO: 200 Shutter Speed: 1/45s Aperture: F11 

My grand-daughter has a yam vine hanging in her mom's window
Both mom and daughter are eager to learn photography, thus came this image as I tried to learn a new technique with them.
I've never done high-key and soft focus; this is one of my first attempts. I did want the detail sharp in the tip leaves while remaining soft throughout the rest of the plant.
In fact, I'm not even certain that this is a good venue for high key. Or, maybe monochrome would be better?
I surely could benefit from helpful critiques, if anybody would be so kind...
Angky.

Attached Images
View Picture EXIF
PENTAX K-1 Mark II  Photo 
08-05-2021, 05:01 PM   #2
Admiral
Loyal Site Supporter
Peter Rockstroh's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Bogota
Posts: 358
The juxtaposition of new growth and old is a very interesting way to take plant portraits There’s not only size differences, but also beautiful differences in the luminosity of new tissue and old. Young leaves are translucent and conduct light like fiber optics. That makes a great contrast when taken against the out of focud silhouette of old leaves. You did a great job here. If you want to see a monochrome version of this concept, I posted a B&W example some time ago titled Tectaria.
08-05-2021, 05:57 PM - 1 Like   #3
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,781
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Peter Rockstroh Quote
The juxtaposition of new growth and old is a very interesting way to take plant portraits There’s not only size differences, but also beautiful differences in the luminosity of new tissue and old. Young leaves are translucent and conduct light like fiber optics. That makes a great contrast when taken against the out of focud silhouette of old leaves. You did a great job here. If you want to see a monochrome version of this concept, I posted a B&W example some time ago titled Tectaria.
Thank you, Peter.
I looked at your Tectaria image and noted your description--another useful bit of info to improve photos.
Also, found myself appreciating the detail that the tonal variations showed.
Angky.
08-05-2021, 07:07 PM   #4
Admiral
Loyal Site Supporter
Peter Rockstroh's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Bogota
Posts: 358
Our eyes are not able to distinguish the same amount of discreet shades of all colors. We can tell apart about 35-40 shades of Green and blue, from the lightest to the darkest, while on yellows and browns the scale is much shorter. B&W allows us to distinguish over 75 shades between white and black (in a silver print).The medium and its tonal scale are more flexible and forgiving. It is more difficult to make an image with a rich tonal scale in color. So if you choose color, green should be the best choice.

08-06-2021, 06:39 PM   #5
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,781
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Peter Rockstroh Quote
Our eyes are not able to distinguish the same amount of discreet shades of all colors. We can tell apart about 35-40 shades of Green and blue, from the lightest to the darkest, while on yellows and browns the scale is much shorter. B&W allows us to distinguish over 75 shades between white and black (in a silver print).The medium and its tonal scale are more flexible and forgiving. It is more difficult to make an image with a rich tonal scale in color. So if you choose color, green should be the best choice.
This is new info for me! Very glad to know it, and it explains a lot of what I've often wondered about.
Thanks for the insight!
Angky.
08-06-2021, 06:39 PM   #6
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,781
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Peter Rockstroh Quote
Our eyes are not able to distinguish the same amount of discreet shades of all colors. We can tell apart about 35-40 shades of Green and blue, from the lightest to the darkest, while on yellows and browns the scale is much shorter. B&W allows us to distinguish over 75 shades between white and black (in a silver print).The medium and its tonal scale are more flexible and forgiving. It is more difficult to make an image with a rich tonal scale in color. So if you choose color, green should be the best choice.
This is new info for me! Very glad to know it, and it explains a lot of what I've often wondered about.
Thanks for the insight!
Angky.

---------- Post added 08-06-21 at 06:43 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by Peter Rockstroh Quote
Our eyes are not able to distinguish the same amount of discreet shades of all colors. We can tell apart about 35-40 shades of Green and blue, from the lightest to the darkest, while on yellows and browns the scale is much shorter. B&W allows us to distinguish over 75 shades between white and black (in a silver print).The medium and its tonal scale are more flexible and forgiving. It is more difficult to make an image with a rich tonal scale in color. So if you choose color, green should be the best choice.
Thanks for this very informative info!
I didn't know this, and It explains some of what I've wondered about in the past.
I'll put this in my mind as I plan future images.
Again, thanks!
Angky.
The forums site crashed as I was responding to your post; so now I have several posts of the same thing!!!

Last edited by angkymac; 08-06-2021 at 06:45 PM. Reason: Explaining the crazy posting.
4 Days Ago   #7
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 338
QuoteOriginally posted by angkymac Quote
My grand-daughter has a yam vine hanging in her mom's window
Both mom and daughter are eager to learn photography, thus came this image as I tried to learn a new technique with them.
I've never done high-key and soft focus; this is one of my first attempts. I did want the detail sharp in the tip leaves while remaining soft throughout the rest of the plant.
In fact, I'm not even certain that this is a good venue for high key. Or, maybe monochrome would be better?
I surely could benefit from helpful critiques, if anybody would be so kind...
Angky.
great shot! I like the way it came out none the less.

4 Days Ago   #8
Site Supporter
Site Supporter




Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 1,781
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by dneira29 Quote
great shot! I like the way it came out none the less.
Thank you for that perspective.
I have just now replaced the ancient lens I used to make that image, so I hope to have more such images, but more easily created (and a bit sharper in critical places).
Thank you for your response!
Angky.
2 Hours Ago   #9
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
maucard's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2016
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 94
QuoteOriginally posted by angkymac Quote
My grand-daughter has a yam vine hanging in her mom's window
Both mom and daughter are eager to learn photography, thus came this image as I tried to learn a new technique with them.
I've never done high-key and soft focus; this is one of my first attempts. I did want the detail sharp in the tip leaves while remaining soft throughout the rest of the plant.
In fact, I'm not even certain that this is a good venue for high key. Or, maybe monochrome would be better?
I surely could benefit from helpful critiques, if anybody would be so kind...
Angky.
I like very much the image, it seems that your experiment has been successful! I like the delicate justapoxition of green and white, I would not feel tgat it could be better un black and white. I only could suggest you to try to obtaim (next time) an even greater evidence of the main "in focus' part, positioning it, if possible, against a very light part of the background.
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
choice, color, critique, high key, image, info, medium, photography, scale, shades, thanks, vine, window, yam vine
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Abstract Bleeding Heart Vine MikeMcE Post Your Photos! 3 08-28-2020 06:33 PM
Nature Vine Ripened. Tonytee Post Your Photos! 3 06-22-2018 08:41 PM
Nature Invasive vine magmotif Post Your Photos! 2 04-29-2018 03:51 PM
People “Gorgeous Lady” A Meets Gorgeous Lady Kerrowdown Post Your Photos! 9 08-09-2017 12:52 PM
Suggestion change the javascript imgwide window to a simple browser window JesseDavis Site Suggestions and Help 2 03-10-2010 10:25 AM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:04 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top