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02-25-2010, 03:19 PM   #1
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Parking Garage
Lens: 18mm Camera: K100D ISO: 200 Shutter Speed: 1/750s Aperture: F8 

I ventured to the top of our parking garage and really liked this view. I always have the chance to take this shot again so I was curious if it could be improved upon.



02-25-2010, 03:41 PM   #2
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I'm not skilled enough to judge the technical aspects of the photograph, so I'll share my impressions.

My eyes like that stair case / elevator shaft structure at the end, as well as the grid like pattern below it, but they're both too far away for the eyes to really explore. Perhaps you can do a series and explore those structures a little from odd angles?
02-25-2010, 04:30 PM   #3
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QuoteOriginally posted by justDIY Quote
I'm not skilled enough to judge the technical aspects of the photograph, so I'll share my impressions.

My eyes like that stair case / elevator shaft structure at the end, as well as the grid like pattern below it, but they're both too far away for the eyes to really explore. Perhaps you can do a series and explore those structures a little from odd angles?
Not sure what elevator shaft you mean? Theres a building in the far background that might look like one? Or do you mean the door on the far right?
02-25-2010, 04:53 PM   #4
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OK, thought it looked a bit big to be an elevator! Yes, it's interesting looking with those hard vertical lines and that little overhanging part at the top.

02-25-2010, 05:10 PM   #5
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QuoteOriginally posted by justDIY Quote
OK, thought it looked a bit big to be an elevator! Yes, it's interesting looking with those hard vertical lines and that little overhanging part at the top.
Haha I see what you mean now. Thats a hotel!
02-25-2010, 06:24 PM   #6
Damn Brit
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Try shooting it with the camera pointing slightly down (try varying degrees) to reduce the amount of sky. It will make the foreground more prominent and lead the eye to the building. If you have the same conditions, you have leeway so shoot at f/11 (or even f/16) to get as deep a DOF as possible, you'll need it if you are shooting at a downward angle..
02-25-2010, 06:30 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
Try shooting it with the camera pointing slightly down (try varying degrees) to reduce the amount of sky. It will make the foreground more prominent and lead the eye to the building. If you have the same conditions, you have leeway so shoot at f/11 (or even f/16) to get as deep a DOF as possible, you'll need it if you are shooting at a downward angle..
Should the foreground be the focal point though? Or the end of the garage?
02-25-2010, 07:00 PM   #8
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This is a great symmetrical shot.
The only thing I would perhaps do is clone out some of the white lines in the bottom left, as IMO they are just a fraction too prominent, and disrupt the symmetry.

02-25-2010, 07:29 PM   #9
Damn Brit
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QuoteOriginally posted by basso4735 Quote
Should the foreground be the focal point though? Or the end of the garage?
The end of the garage will always be the focal point. Having the foreground starting off closer so that you can see some finer detail will just lead the eye to it. Because of the distances involved in this picture there isn't enough detail to make it interesting. What there is is a thin strip across the middle of the frame with all that wasted space above and below.
02-25-2010, 10:44 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by Damn Brit Quote
The end of the garage will always be the focal point. Having the foreground starting off closer so that you can see some finer detail will just lead the eye to it. Because of the distances involved in this picture there isn't enough detail to make it interesting. What there is is a thin strip across the middle of the frame with all that wasted space above and below.
I see what you are saying. I will definitely go back and reshoot using everyones feedback.
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