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04-15-2010, 11:30 AM   #1
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Great uncle
Lens: 70mm Camera: K-x Photo Location: Disneyland ISO: 3200 Shutter Speed: 1/15s Aperture: F4.5 



04-15-2010, 11:32 AM   #2
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this was hand held in the middle of a crowd. but i really love the shot, is the blurriness on the nose of the guy do to being hand held?
04-15-2010, 03:09 PM   #3
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To answer you question, yes, the blur on his nose was either him moving during the shot or you moving the camera when the picture was taken. I know that you like the photo but there is alot wrong with it. Firstly, there is way to much going on in the background and it is very distracting to the rest of the image.

The colors look good for the conditions and I am really impressed that this shoot was taken at ISO 3200. With my K20D I could never even come close to that kind of IQ and it does make me a little jealous.

In the end it is still a very cute shot, but next time bring a tripod and try not to take hand held shots in the dark.

Hope this helps.
Cory
04-15-2010, 03:34 PM   #4
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Given the sharpness in the rest of the photo I would think it is likely he moved, which is very possible in 1/15.

The general rule for handheld shots is a source of great debate, but generally is either the length up to twice the length of the lens.

ie hand held 50mm = min 1/50 - safe 1/100

There is a thread on min handheld speeds, but everyone/lens is different.

compositionally keep in mind what else is in the shot, like the yellow highlights in the middle left, which compete with the subject for the eyes attention.

I did a 1 min hack job on it, just as a second take on it for you... hope u don't mind.

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04-15-2010, 03:35 PM   #5
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ah maybe as a portrait, and I think I missed the skin tones on this screen.
04-15-2010, 04:25 PM   #6
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That is far too much processing (the second one), and the first one might just be beyond help, honestly. If you try converting it to black and white it will help out with the color problems and some of the noise problems, but other than that there's really just not much you can do with that. I'm not really sure what's causing the ghosting on his face, either.
04-15-2010, 09:26 PM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by Tuner571 Quote
To answer you question, yes, the blur on his nose was either him moving during the shot or you moving the camera when the picture was taken. I know that you like the photo but there is alot wrong with it. Firstly, there is way to much going on in the background and it is very distracting to the rest of the image.

The colors look good for the conditions and I am really impressed that this shoot was taken at ISO 3200. With my K20D I could never even come close to that kind of IQ and it does make me a little jealous.

In the end it is still a very cute shot, but next time bring a tripod and try not to take hand held shots in the dark.

Hope this helps.
Cory
I was going to my tripod but at the last minute decided not to, figured it would be to crowded. it was i ended up in a corner packed in like a sardine lol.

QuoteOriginally posted by icywarm Quote
Given the sharpness in the rest of the photo I would think it is likely he moved, which is very possible in 1/15.

The general rule for handheld shots is a source of great debate, but generally is either the length up to twice the length of the lens.

ie hand held 50mm = min 1/50 - safe 1/100

There is a thread on min handheld speeds, but everyone/lens is different.

compositionally keep in mind what else is in the shot, like the yellow highlights in the middle left, which compete with the subject for the eyes attention.

I did a 1 min hack job on it, just as a second take on it for you... hope u don't mind.
i really don't like lightening of the skin, sorry. I have heard about that rule from a friend who quickly pointed it to me again after seeing these pics lol. i need to write it down lol.

QuoteOriginally posted by jct us101 Quote
That is far too much processing (the second one), and the first one might just be beyond help, honestly. If you try converting it to black and white it will help out with the color problems and some of the noise problems, but other than that there's really just not much you can do with that. I'm not really sure what's causing the ghosting on his face, either.
all i have at the moment it gimp but i am looking into a new desktop and downloading some free trial offers for pp to see which one will work best for me.


thank you all for your input, i am new to this and have so much to learn.
04-16-2010, 11:42 AM   #8
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You did a pretty good job to capture a tender moment - the expression on the girl's face is priceless. I just wish the uncle had another expression on his face other than, "I can only take another minute or two of this, oh my aching back!" LOL! Getting those two expressions is hard though, and sometimes it doesn't happen.

Taking photos in situations like this is always about compromise. In the same situation, I would have been tempted to push the ISO even higher - to 6400 - grain be damned. That would have given me 1/30 and a fighting chance to get a sharp shot. Once home, I would push it another half stop or more to brighten the subjects, and then converted it to black and white. The colors in the image, after all, don't really add to the story being told, and in fact are a distraction. Once that was done I would have cropped it tighter, getting rid of the jacket on the left, and voila, Bob's my uncle!

04-16-2010, 02:25 PM   #9
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QuoteOriginally posted by johnmflores Quote
You did a pretty good job to capture a tender moment - the expression on the girl's face is priceless. I just wish the uncle had another expression on his face other than, "I can only take another minute or two of this, oh my aching back!" LOL! Getting those two expressions is hard though, and sometimes it doesn't happen.

Taking photos in situations like this is always about compromise. In the same situation, I would have been tempted to push the ISO even higher - to 6400 - grain be damned. That would have given me 1/30 and a fighting chance to get a sharp shot. Once home, I would push it another half stop or more to brighten the subjects, and then converted it to black and white. The colors in the image, after all, don't really add to the story being told, and in fact are a distraction. Once that was done I would have cropped it tighter, getting rid of the jacket on the left, and voila, Bob's my uncle!
nice pun

ok i messed around with GIMP (sounds so wrong) let me know if this is better. i suck at PP

04-16-2010, 02:54 PM   #10
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If you want to keep the black and white, you might be able to get rid of the ghosted nose (and the girl's hand below his chin) with the heal or clone tool to try to give some definition back. I wonder how others might feel about adding some gaussian blur to the background to move focus back to the subjects.

And don't shortchange the GIMP!
04-16-2010, 02:58 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by ICTUS TACTUS Quote
If you want to keep the black and white, you might be able to get rid of the ghosted nose (and the girl's hand below his chin) with the heal or clone tool to try to give some definition back. I wonder how others might feel about adding some gaussian blur to the background to move focus back to the subjects.

And don't shortchange the GIMP!
so far GIMP has done pretty good its the user that is lacking. i need to watch some videos on how to use gimp so i won't be doing this by trial and error.
04-16-2010, 07:49 PM   #12
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Not too get TOO far into postprocessing in this forum... try YouTube - malgalin's Channel

I find he's got some useful tips that aren't overly technical if you're looking for a quick fix.
04-17-2010, 06:57 AM   #13
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QuoteOriginally posted by Oddity96 Quote
nice pun

ok i messed around with GIMP (sounds so wrong) let me know if this is better. i suck at PP

This is a different photo now - the young girl and her eyes is more clearly the subject than before. I think that the cropping to the left may be a bit too much - the uncle is about to run into a wall LOL! Push the left frame out a little bit and give the uncle a little breathing room and I think you have something there.

There's one more thing to try if you'd like - tint the image with a sepia tone or something. In the offset printing world it's called a duotone, and what it does is increase the number of tones that are available to render an image. With a standard black and white image, you typically have 10 shades of gray (+/- shades depending upon the dynamic range of your image) available to use, and your conversion program (Photoshop, GIMP, etc...) replaces each pixel of color with one of those shades. The formulas and algorithms by which it does that is highly variable, and that's what differentiates one program from another.

With a duotone, you have the 10 shades of gray + 10 shades of your duotone color (i.e., sepia), essentially 20 tones to map to a color image. What you end up with is a little more subtlety and nuance, especially in shadow areas and such.

I don't how to do that in GIMP (I do agree that it's a funny name!) but I thought that I'd share...
04-17-2010, 01:13 PM   #14
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I do like it better in B&W. Shows that most photos are not lost causes if they are worth keeping.
04-19-2010, 12:38 PM   #15
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QuoteOriginally posted by johnmflores Quote
This is a different photo now - the young girl and her eyes is more clearly the subject than before. I think that the cropping to the left may be a bit too much - the uncle is about to run into a wall LOL! Push the left frame out a little bit and give the uncle a little breathing room and I think you have something there.

There's one more thing to try if you'd like - tint the image with a sepia tone or something. In the offset printing world it's called a duotone, and what it does is increase the number of tones that are available to render an image. With a standard black and white image, you typically have 10 shades of gray (+/- shades depending upon the dynamic range of your image) available to use, and your conversion program (Photoshop, GIMP, etc...) replaces each pixel of color with one of those shades. The formulas and algorithms by which it does that is highly variable, and that's what differentiates one program from another.

With a duotone, you have the 10 shades of gray + 10 shades of your duotone color (i.e., sepia), essentially 20 tones to map to a color image. What you end up with is a little more subtlety and nuance, especially in shadow areas and such.

I don't how to do that in GIMP (I do agree that it's a funny name!) but I thought that I'd share...
i tried but was not happy with the results. i know its the user not the program. i tried to hide the back ground with a blur effect but i am not happy with it all.


QuoteOriginally posted by icywarm Quote
I do like it better in B&W. Shows that most photos are not lost causes if they are worth keeping.
yes i love this shot and want to keep it. i messed around and think this one might be a keeper for a 4x6 print.



the hand blur is pretty much gone. the only thing is it is kind of dark but think on a good glossy paper it will be alright. comments please
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