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01-26-2013, 04:05 AM   #1
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film types and samples

hi everyone...

i think it is already obvious to all you guys that i'm a noob when it comes to film... so here it goes...

does anyone have a site link that discusses the different types of film, and sample shots of each? ex samples from velvia... or whatever types of film that
is still available in the market? because right now... i see so many and i don't know which one to pick...

thanks!

01-26-2013, 05:26 AM   #2
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i have not a huge experience in film but tried some, here is my conclusion :

color :
- fuji superia is cheap but not super saturated, and is not great when pushed. but, hey ! it's damn cheap !!

- the kodak gold is like the superia but more saturated

- Kodak portra is awesome : nice color, nice sat. my favorite color film so far.


b&w :
- kodak triX is cheap but good ! don't push it more than 2 stops : it become too grainy.

- Kodak Tmax is a bit better, finer grain, and depending on the place you live can cost only 0.10 or .020c more than TriX.

- Ilford HP5+ is like triX

- Ilford delta can be pushed up to 3 stops without any visible grain degradation in my expericence. i go for it when i need clear pictures. but cost more.


i suggest you to take some cheap film to begin, and try out some differents film each time. That's a part of the fun : changing film for different purpose

Last edited by aurele; 01-26-2013 at 05:43 AM.
01-26-2013, 06:32 AM - 1 Like   #3
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My experience with 120 films so far.

My two cents ... and again I look forward to the comments of those who have more experience than I in these matters. I have tried a handful of films and here is my take on them:

Color negative: I've only tried one, and that's Kodak Ektar. Scans wonderfully, NO grain and at least to me seems to lean a bit warm. 100 asa film

Black and White:

My favorite with no reservation is Fuji Neopan Acros. This stuff has wonderful tones when developed with Rodinal at 1:50 or even 1:100 stand developing. Just really pleasing, wide range without being too contrasty. This is silly, but it's the only film I've come across that the bit of tape on the backing will willingly peel off without too much effort in the dark. No need for cutting!

I've tried the Arista EDU 100. It's okay, gives nice mid tones in stand developing, but a bit more contrasty to my eye. The big drawback is this film curls along it's length very badly and is a pain in the rear to get into stock holders.

Rolli Retro 400. As the name hints, it is a bit grainier and contrasty than others. If you're going for a less refined, perhaps "newsfilm" look, this can give it to you. This film too has a curling issue, but not as bad as the Arista. Comes in really nice plastic containers, which is nice, but not a film that suits my taste.

Kodak T-Max 100 and 400. Both wonderful films, beautiful tones and a the ability to capture a very wide range of light/dark. The 100 has nearly invisible grain and the 400 just a little less so. Again, my only developer experience to this point is Rodinal, and these films look wonderful if stand developed. I am curious how it would look using the Kodak's T-Max specific developer.

My sense is that the Kodak is usually the most expensive of the bunch I've tried followed by the Rolli. The Acros is my gold standard now, less expensive than the Kodak and to my eye very good looking indeed. The Arista from Freestyle is exactly what it is designed for, an inexpensive film intended for students.

Regards
01-26-2013, 10:32 AM   #4
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QuoteOriginally posted by germar Quote
...
Again, my only developer experience to this point is Rodinal, and these films look wonderful if stand developed. I am curious how it would look using the Kodak's T-Max specific developer.
Rodinal will give you some of the largest grain. Some say "true grain" but it is not known as a fine grain developer. T-Max developer is fine. The time-compensation needed kind of sucks but it yields a nice tonal scale as practically all developers do and with pretty fine grain.

01-26-2013, 10:35 AM   #5
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Also don’t forget slide film (E6 processing).

Fuji Velvia 50 & 100 and Provia 400X are very good.

You can also still get Kodak Ektachrome E100G, which has been discontinued

Phil.
01-26-2013, 10:39 AM   #6
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i was in the store that sells film a while ago... and i found it funny that the superia is roughly $45 for a pack of 5 (iso 400) while this fuji pro400x or something like that is roughly $25... i have no idea why that is more expensive than the other one.

i also have another roll here... its a kodak with a code tmy 120, what is that film? coz when i bought from the store... i just grabbed a couple pcs of each and couldnt remember them... wanted to see what suits my style



i was checking online for samples of shots using velvia... i liked the tone and all... but when i had mine developed (e6) it was way different... so now i don't know what that film is...
01-26-2013, 11:33 AM   #7
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QuoteOriginally posted by ponggo Quote
...
i also have another roll here... its a kodak with a code tmy 120, what is that film?
It must have been some time ago. TMY is Kodak T-Max 400 ( TMX is T-Max 100). Around 2008 they reformulated it and the newer version is coded TMY-2.
01-26-2013, 11:45 AM   #8
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Here is a link: Technique - Kodak Ektar 100 test - Conclusions

..Some films discussed and compared quite thoroughly. Regards

01-26-2013, 12:05 PM   #9
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Velvia 50 new version- Saturated and only slightly different from the old version. Blue-green emphasis.
Velvia 100- Not as saturated as the 50 but emphasizes the red- orange end of the spectrum.
Velvia 100f- A scaled back version of Velvia 50--- not as saturated.
Provia 400X- Very similar to 100f but not quite as saturated-- The grain is almost as fine.
01-26-2013, 12:42 PM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by ponggo Quote
hi everyone...

i think it is already obvious to all you guys that i'm a noob when it comes to film... so here it goes...

does anyone have a site link that discusses the different types of film, and sample shots of each? ex samples from velvia... or whatever types of film that
is still available in the market? because right now... i see so many and i don't know which one to pick...

thanks!
Flickr has groups dedicated to nearly all different available films. Searching for groups or tags for any film will give a ton of samples.
01-26-2013, 02:28 PM   #11
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I found the following site useful, as it has a facility to view and compare different films of the same picture:
Colour Film Comparison Pt. 3 - On Landscape
The link is for part three, there are two earlier parts too.
01-26-2013, 04:12 PM   #12
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While you are learning, I would suggest the following:
  • Use consumer-grade negative film for color work. I would suggest Kodak Gold 200.
  • For B&W, use a decent quality film of moderate speed and process using standard developers according to the standard directions. Most of us who have been doing this for awhile cut our teeth on Tri-X developed in D-76. Shoot at box speed and develop using standard technique and you will get consistent results.
As your skills increase, you might want to broaden your palate to include professional color films such as Ektar, Portra, or Velvia. For B&W, Fuji Acros 100 and T-Max 100 are both pretty hard to beat.

With time, you will discover where your film is letting you down and will be in a good position to move to more specialized emulsions or developers This usually happens with B&W as we try to squeeze detail out of both highlight and shadow while maintaining a rich/smooth tonal range. Unfortunately, it takes a few years to know what you are after and to attain the skills to get there!


Steve
01-27-2013, 09:43 AM   #13
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Hi there! thanks for the inputs!

this is a sample from the first roll of film i shot...

i used a velvia 100f




however, there are some people who say that the color is not like a velvia... if that is not the case... how does a shot from a velvia look like?
can anyone post a sample?
01-27-2013, 10:34 AM   #14
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QuoteOriginally posted by ponggo Quote
Hi there! thanks for the inputs!

this is a sample from the first roll of film i shot...

i used a velvia 100f




however, there are some people who say that the color is not like a velvia... if that is not the case... how does a shot from a velvia look like?
can anyone post a sample?
This is a regular Velvia 100 shot, but in 135.




Phil.
01-29-2013, 06:51 PM   #15
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hmmm... i got a bluish tint on mine... wondering what happened out there! hahaha!
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