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02-09-2013, 06:05 PM   #31
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
batteries last for a very long time then
Actually this is another point I should have brought up - the pentax 67 and 645 cameras are completely battery dependant, Other makers (Hasselblad, Bronica) have an emergency mechanical shutter speed that allow people to use their cameras without batteries. Also excessive use of mirror lock up can really eat through batteries on the Pentax 67II

02-09-2013, 08:37 PM   #32
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QuoteOriginally posted by Digitalis Quote
Actually this is another point I should have brought up - the pentax 67 and 645 cameras are completely battery dependant, Other makers (Hasselblad, Bronica) have an emergency mechanical shutter speed that allow people to use their cameras without batteries. Also excessive use of mirror lock up can really eat through batteries on the Pentax 67II
I have a 500C/M too.
02-10-2013, 02:57 PM   #33
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The 67 and 55mm or 45mm (both f4) would be a killer start-up combination. There are times when supplemental metering will be necessary (e.g. hand-held metering) with the 67 in low light. The 67 meters to a maximum of 1 second. After this, bulb and timed exposure based on a hand-held meter is the way to go.

Manual focus is and always will be the chosen preserve of those with an eye for the craft rather than expediency. There is something very tangible and rewarding about snapping the viewfinder of the big 67 into critically sharp focus and then, when the film comes back, to stare in wonder at the razor sharp detail that is afforded by the previously mentioned lenses (55mm and 45mm). A tripod is essential to get the very best of the imaging quality especially in landscape work. Street work with high speed film will enable you go get away from a tripod.
02-10-2013, 04:51 PM   #34
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
The 67 and 55mm or 45mm (both f4) would be a killer start-up combination. There are times when supplemental metering will be necessary (e.g. hand-held metering) with the 67 in low light. The 67 meters to a maximum of 1 second. After this, bulb and timed exposure based on a hand-held meter is the way to go.

Manual focus is and always will be the chosen preserve of those with an eye for the craft rather than expediency. There is something very tangible and rewarding about snapping the viewfinder of the big 67 into critically sharp focus and then, when the film comes back, to stare in wonder at the razor sharp detail that is afforded by the previously mentioned lenses (55mm and 45mm). A tripod is essential to get the very best of the imaging quality — especially in landscape work. Street work with high speed film will enable you go get away from a tripod.

Yeah, I've decided I will go for a 67 or alike, I will read up on the three different ones and then start trawling for prices. For a start I will probably only need something like a 35mm and a 50mm equivalent (eq. to 35mm format that is) for the things I intend to do. MLU, I guess is a great thing to have, is that standard on all of them, or an optional fit? Oh, and I WILL need a remote shutter cable!


Cheers
JF Felinik

02-11-2013, 01:02 AM   #35
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Mirror lock-up is more common the later Pentax 67, not the Asahi Pentax 6x7 bodies; it is very useful for larger tele lenses. In a similar vein, a multi-exposure factory-fitted modification can sometimes be found on good Pentax 67 bodies; this is useful if you're going to be arty-farty and explore the potential for multiple exposures, juxtapositions, inverse relationships of image-upon-image ... all those things that are good for putting your less enlightened-friends in a tizzy spin.

All Asahi Pentax 6x7 and Pentax 67 bodies are getting on now. Scour the earth very carefully for a good to mint condition specimen, otherwise an old and battered one will require progressively more need for repairs/repatriation, and scant few shops repairs these dinosaurs now. It goes without saying that a well-looked after 6x7 or 67 body will be a potentially better investment than one that has spent a lot of its time being chucked around willy-nilly and featuring battle scars like deformed prisms, bent shutter speed pinion/shaft, missing 120-220 film selector dial (right side of body), rusted X/FP sync contacts, broken or fatigued tripod socket, poor to non-existent light seals... on and on the list goes. Not to dishearten you, just to galvanise you into taking care with your investigations and choice.
02-11-2013, 03:59 AM   #36
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
Mirror lock-up is more common the later Pentax 67, not the Asahi Pentax 6x7 bodies; it is very useful for larger tele lenses. In a similar vein, a multi-exposure factory-fitted modification can sometimes be found on good Pentax 67 bodies; this is useful if you're going to be arty-farty and explore the potential for multiple exposures, juxtapositions, inverse relationships of image-upon-image ... all those things that are good for putting your less enlightened-friends in a tizzy spin.

All Asahi Pentax 6x7 and Pentax 67 bodies are getting on now. Scour the earth very carefully for a good to mint condition specimen, otherwise an old and battered one will require progressively more need for repairs/repatriation, and scant few shops repairs these dinosaurs now. It goes without saying that a well-looked after 6x7 or 67 body will be a potentially better investment than one that has spent a lot of its time being chucked around willy-nilly and featuring battle scars like deformed prisms, bent shutter speed pinion/shaft, missing 120-220 film selector dial (right side of body), rusted X/FP sync contacts, broken or fatigued tripod socket, poor to non-existent light seals... on and on the list goes. Not to dishearten you, just to galvanise you into taking care with your investigations and choice.
Ah, so MLU is maybe not really required, after all for what I intend to do I want to compose every frame on that valuable 120/220 roll, though I was thinking maybe the mirror vibrates enough to potentially ruin the shots and then a well composed frame, lockup the mirror, and then shoot, would be a good procedure?

Anyway, indeed, if I go for any flavor of 67 I'll try to find a well working nice looking unit, else I will just start thinking about having someone refurbish it and it will never be used until I have the cash to get the work done... been there, done that... HEHE!


Thanks!


Cheers
JF Felinik
02-11-2013, 11:12 AM   #37
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QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
You want a "nice big negative". Arguably the 6x4.5 frame on a 120 roll is the APS-C of medium format film.
That depends whether you crop (frequently) or not. If you crop 6x6, you end up with something approaching 6x4.5, so only 6x7 gives a real advantage.
On the other hand, the square format is more attractive than I thought (I've found a nice Rolleiflex 2.8F), and I tend not to crop. I guess years of shooting transparencies does that to you.
Even so, the difference between 24x36 to 6x4.5 is bigger than that between 6x4.5 and 6x7.

Prices on 645 lenses have come down, btw, this may be a good time to buy into it—if the 645DII is in the works, as it appears to be, prices may go up again later.
02-11-2013, 12:44 PM   #38
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QuoteOriginally posted by JFN Quote
Ah, so MLU is maybe not really required, after all for what I intend to do I want to compose every frame on that valuable 120/220 roll, though I was thinking maybe the mirror vibrates enough to potentially ruin the shots and then a well composed frame, lockup the mirror, and then shoot, would be a good procedure?

Anyway, indeed, if I go for any flavor of 67 I'll try to find a well working nice looking unit, else I will just start thinking about having someone refurbish it and it will never be used until I have the cash to get the work done... been there, done that... HEHE!


Thanks!


Cheers
JF Felinik
Even if you don't plan on using MLU, I highly recommend getting at least a 6x7 with MLU. When the came out with the MLU version of the 6x7, the also upgraded the film spool tabs/pins. I haven't used one, but I have read that loading/unloading film on the original was much harder because of the film spool holders. MLU is definitely worth having too.
Also, you don't necessarily need to find a mint example. My 67 was a beat up parts body that I had CLA'd and had the back replace (original had a broken pressure plate pin) and mine has worked flawlessly for over 3 years and over 40 rolls of film.
On the contrary, awhile back I purchased a mint look 6x7 and found out that the shutter wasn't working and was nearly unrepairable.

Buying used camera gear is a bit "luck of the draw". I would figure a proper CLA into your initial costs.

02-11-2013, 01:06 PM   #39
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For tripod work, I would go with the MLU version. For handheld work, the non MLU version works fine. There were both Asahi and Honeywell 6x7 models that had no lock up. The Honeywell was for US customers while the Asahi was for non US. Just to keep things confusing, the newer Asahi model had MLU but the Honeywells were not upgraded and did not have MLU unless custom modified. The Honeywell name was dropped for the US market. Yes, the non MLU bodies were much slower to load. I had to modify mine. Most Asahi 6x7s on the market today have MLU.
02-11-2013, 03:50 PM   #40
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QuoteOriginally posted by Smolk Quote
On the other hand, the square format is more attractive than I thought
ohh I have a lot of students that are too accustomed to the 3:2 ratio - I often assign them to work with the square, and after some initial adjustment they start doing some really interesting things with it. 6X6 has a zen quality to it: there is no inherent emphasis in any direction, and it is so easy to buy frames for 6X6 photographs.
02-11-2013, 06:36 PM   #41
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I love the square format, but here in Ireland it is in fact impossible to buy frames for it. In fact, I'd say that's the biggest disadvantage!
02-11-2013, 10:39 PM   #42
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I actually get my framing custom cut - and assemble the frames myself. It is easier to put a price on four equal pieces: most framers charge you based on the longest piece, which is too bad if two of the pieces for the frame are shorter.

Last edited by Digitalis; 02-13-2013 at 04:03 AM.
02-13-2013, 03:16 AM   #43
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Okay, so between the 6x7 (except for early models without MLU) and 67, there's no difference really, is that correct? And for the 67II the major improvement is the AV mode, and TTL flash?

So in my case a 67 or 6x7 will be just great I guess then!

02-13-2013, 08:03 AM   #44
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A 67 from a good owner is not too old to need any work to start using it usually. Same with the 67II. But a 6x7 can be pretty old and need service. You'd definitely want to inquire about its age.

GET A MLU VERSION !!

Seriously, even if you think you won't be using it.
02-13-2013, 08:29 AM   #45
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Yeah, I will get a MLU one, I can already see that I will not be happy missing such an important option!




Cheers,
JF Felinik
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