Forgot Password
Pentax Camera Forums Home
 

Reply
Show Printable Version Search this Thread
03-25-2014, 01:49 PM   #1
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Moscow
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8
What is the difference between Pentax 6x7 MLU and Pentax 67?

Hello guys, I need your kind adviсe for choosing a perfect medium format camera.

What is the difference between Pentax 6x7 MLU and Pentax 67?

The most important thing - which camera from those two is more survival and will not require reparation soon?

In which case the probability to get a camera with some problems or impact is higher?

In which case the effect of shaking of the camera with its huge mirror while shooting is less (without a tripod)?

In which case the effect of shaking of the camera with its own shutter while shooting in MLU regime on a tripod is less?

Does a wood grip help significantly in its handling (is it much better to buy a camera with a grip)?

Which 67 lenses are really perfect for portraits? For example, is Takumar 150 fine?

Is the internal lightmeter in the pentaprism precise and convenient (is it much better to buy a prism with TTL)?


I have read that problem with shaking by shutter was almost eliminated in 67II, but it's twice more expensive.

Thank you so much in advance.


Last edited by podvalnyy; 03-25-2014 at 01:57 PM. Reason: orthography
03-25-2014, 02:20 PM   #2
Pentaxian
Swift1's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Oregon
Photos: Gallery | Albums
Posts: 3,921
The main difference is that the 6X7 is older than the 67. The film transport is possibly (?) a little sturdier in the 67 model.
If you are buying one that hasn't been serviced somewhat recently, I would factor in the cost of a CLA.
I have yet to run across a 6x7 lens that wasn't more than adequate. The 150/2.8 should be great for portraits. It's supposedly slightly soft wide-open, which some prefer. If you want more sharpness, the 165/2.8 is supposedly superb.
The mirror shake issue is greatly exaggerated IMO.
I don't know much about the wood handle, or the TTL prism.
03-25-2014, 03:06 PM   #3
Veteran Member
Silent Street's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Geelong & Richmond, Vic AUS
Posts: 501
QuoteQuote:
What is the difference between Pentax 6x7 MLU and Pentax 67?
Essentially they are the same. The 6x7 designation dates way back to the 1960s while the 67 designation is the more 'modernised' version from around 1991. Many people avoid the older 6x7 bodies because they have been through so much without a single service and can and do come up with problems like winding mechanism faults, or electrical faults related to the rudimentary shutter speed assembly.

QuoteQuote:
The most important thing - which camera from those two is more survival and will not require reparation soon?
The 67 version. All things else being equal though you have to know, or be able to assess, how it has been used in the past. A camera that has been dropped, banged, belted, smashed, scraped and generally treated like an expendable workshop tool will give problems somewhere along the line. The most common malaise with either the 6x7 or 67 is with the winding mechanism: rough handling here can strip the pawls. It's also a mechanism designed to be operated with onen single wide stroke, not several.

QuoteQuote:
In which case the probability to get a camera with some problems or impact is higher?
Yes.

QuoteQuote:
In which case the effect of shaking of the camera with its huge mirror while shooting is less (without a tripod)?
All medium format cameras will suffer more readily from mirror-induced vibration. Many photographers boast they can hand-hold a 67 down to 1/30 and produce sharp images. However, it is when you print those images to say 80cm x 60cm (exhibition size) that the folly become evident: the image will indeed be unsharp with evidence of shake. Mirror lock up can help, but it essentially only separates the two operations instead of them taking place immediately you press the shutter. MLU first, then firing the shutter, with a good solid support underneath (ideally a tripod) will yield good results. But a tripod for all exposures will yield the very best results if high quality images are what you are after.


QuoteQuote:
In which case the effect of shaking of the camera with its own shutter while shooting in MLU regime on a tripod is less?
See above answer.


QuoteQuote:
Does a wood grip help significantly in its handling (is it much better to buy a camera with a grip)?
No. It adds weight and bulk to an already awkward, very large camera.

QuoteQuote:
Which 67 lenses are really perfect for portraits? For example, is Takumar 150 fine?
165mm f4 LS or 90mm LS (leaf shutter) lenses. All photographers will have their own preferred lens for portraiture. You will need to experiment with several to find one that suits you. What is best for others with a lot of experience may be totally unsuitable for you.

QuoteQuote:
Is the internal lightmeter in the pentaprism precise and convenient (is it much better to buy a prism with TTL)?
The TTL meter is rudimentary but very capable and handles high contrast scenes very well. However, it has a 5-stop range which, if not understood, can result in gross over- or under-exposure. This is to say, the central triangle is correct exposure, and upward or below that is 2.5 stops respectively, with no precise setting it's something you learn to come to grips with over time and experience.


QuoteQuote:
I have read that problem with shaking by shutter was almost eliminated in 67II, but it's twice more expensive.
"Almost eliminated"? That's news to me. And the 67II is far removed from both the 6x7 and 67 cameras it replaced, even though it uses the same lens system. Many of the foibles that plagued the 6x7 / 67 cameras were addressed in the 67II. It even has a smarter metering system, not that experienced professionals will actually choose the camera for that reason alone.

Thank you so much in advance.
03-25-2014, 04:32 PM   #4
Pentaxian




Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 7,017
Many years ago I was part owner in a sailboat and did some local racing here in the Puget Sound area. I'd take my 6x7 with me occasionally and that was the only time I found the wooden grip useful. Bouncing around on a sailboat beating into the wind it was a good safety measure but on dry land, I'd never bother.

If you are overly concerned about a mirror and the inertia of the shutter curtain, leaf shutter cameras and rangefinders are alternatives you can consider. I have one of each and I must say I can hardly hear the shutter release on my Mamiya 7II but it is a rangefinder which is a bit different experience.

03-26-2014, 08:42 AM   #5
New Member




Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Moscow
Photos: Gallery
Posts: 8
Original Poster
QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
Essentially they are the same. The 6x7 designation dates way back to the 1960s while the 67 designation is the more 'modernised' version from around 1991. Many people avoid the older 6x7 bodies because they have been through so much without a single service and can and do come up with problems like winding mechanism faults, or electrical faults related to the rudimentary shutter speed assembly.


The 67 version. All things else being equal though you have to know, or be able to assess, how it has been used in the past. A camera that has been dropped, banged, belted, smashed, scraped and generally treated like an expendable workshop tool will give problems somewhere along the line. The most common malaise with either the 6x7 or 67 is with the winding mechanism: rough handling here can strip the pawls. It's also a mechanism designed to be operated with onen single wide stroke, not several.


Yes.


All medium format cameras will suffer more readily from mirror-induced vibration. Many photographers boast they can hand-hold a 67 down to 1/30 and produce sharp images. However, it is when you print those images to say 80cm x 60cm (exhibition size) that the folly become evident: the image will indeed be unsharp with evidence of shake. Mirror lock up can help, but it essentially only separates the two operations instead of them taking place immediately you press the shutter. MLU first, then firing the shutter, with a good solid support underneath (ideally a tripod) will yield good results. But a tripod for all exposures will yield the very best results if high quality images are what you are after.



See above answer.



No. It adds weight and bulk to an already awkward, very large camera.


165mm f4 LS or 90mm LS (leaf shutter) lenses. All photographers will have their own preferred lens for portraiture. You will need to experiment with several to find one that suits you. What is best for others with a lot of experience may be totally unsuitable for you.


The TTL meter is rudimentary but very capable and handles high contrast scenes very well. However, it has a 5-stop range which, if not understood, can result in gross over- or under-exposure. This is to say, the central triangle is correct exposure, and upward or below that is 2.5 stops respectively, with no precise setting it's something you learn to come to grips with over time and experience.



"Almost eliminated"? That's news to me. And the 67II is far removed from both the 6x7 and 67 cameras it replaced, even though it uses the same lens system. Many of the foibles that plagued the 6x7 / 67 cameras were addressed in the 67II. It even has a smarter metering system, not that experienced professionals will actually choose the camera for that reason alone.
Thanks a lot for such a thorough answer!

---------- Post added 03-26-14 at 06:52 PM ----------

QuoteOriginally posted by tuco Quote
Many years ago I was part owner in a sailboat and did some local racing here in the Puget Sound area. I'd take my 6x7 with me occasionally and that was the only time I found the wooden grip useful. Bouncing around on a sailboat beating into the wind it was a good safety measure but on dry land, I'd never bother.

If you are overly concerned about a mirror and the inertia of the shutter curtain, leaf shutter cameras and rangefinders are alternatives you can consider. I have one of each and I must say I can hardly hear the shutter release on my Mamiya 7II but it is a rangefinder which is a bit different experience.
I have a rowing boat, and when I take a camera on it, I always hang it on my neck. I have just impressed what happens if I fall overboard with pentax 67 on my neck ))
Reply

Bookmarks
  • Submit Thread to Facebook Facebook
  • Submit Thread to Twitter Twitter
  • Submit Thread to Digg Digg
Tags - Make this thread easier to find by adding keywords to it!
6x7, camera, cameras, difference between pentax, effect, experience, grip, images, lens, lot, mechanism, medium format, mlu, mlu and pentax, neck, need advice, pentax, pentax 67, pentax 6x7, pentax 6x7 mlu, shutter, tripod
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Difference between Pentax '67ii' folding focus hood and '67' folding focus hood? rustyair Pentax Medium Format 3 10-02-2013 08:10 AM
What's the difference between DA and FA? gabro822 Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 22 05-27-2012 03:47 PM
What is the difference between KA and K mount? Zephries Pentax SLR Lens Discussion 8 05-16-2012 10:47 PM
what is the difference between Av, Tv, and P? justtakingpics Troubleshooting and Beginner Help 19 05-06-2010 04:09 AM
What Is Your Favorite Pentax 67 or 6x7 Lens?? baltochef920 Pentax Medium Format 20 03-24-2009 09:25 PM



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:28 PM. | See also: NikonForums.com, CanonForums.com part of our network of photo forums!
  • Red (Default)
  • Green
  • Gray
  • Dark
  • Dark Yellow
  • Dark Blue
  • Old Red
  • Old Green
  • Old Gray
  • Dial-Up Style
Hello! It's great to see you back on the forum! Have you considered joining the community?
register
Creating a FREE ACCOUNT takes under a minute, removes ads, and lets you post! [Dismiss]
Top