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08-26-2014, 11:41 AM   #1
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Broken Chain on 67

So I was changing my aperture yesterday while out shooting and I heard an extra click after getting to 2.4. Didn't think much of it except my meter prism didn't work unless I turned my lens to MAN. Today I discovered that my chain snapped in the middle. I've looked up how to repair it and it seems a little daunting. If I leave my lens on MAN can I get by without the chain? I also have a WLF coming and will probably be using that more often as well. Will having the chain rattle around loose inside cause any damage?

thanks it sucks cause I've only had the camera about two weeks!

08-26-2014, 01:02 PM   #2
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Welcome to the forum!

Eric can fix the chain issue, this is his website:

Pentax Camera Service

Otherwise you can use a handheld meter and the WLF or the TTL with stop-down metering. (MAN on lens)

Here is a link to the 67 manual, it shows the procedure on how to remove the TTL prism & AUTO lens:

Pentax 67 Manual

Phil.

Last edited by gofour3; 08-26-2014 at 01:09 PM.
08-26-2014, 01:09 PM   #3
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I had a broken chain on mine, and had Eric fix it and do a CLA, which he said it needed due to buildup of metal dust on the electro magnets. It has been great since. Worth the cost, but more expensive than the average body.
08-26-2014, 01:48 PM   #4
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That is some bad luck. I've had my original 6x7 since 1988 and also two others I use quite a bit. Never had this problem. The breaking chain is not as common as you might have heard. Using the lenses on MAN works for some people but you would have to try it to see for yourself.

08-26-2014, 02:28 PM - 2 Likes   #5
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A breaking chain is stress-induced, not one that occurs just for the sake of fracturing. It can and does happen if the lens-prism re-mount procedure is not followed as this will impose stress on the chain through operation of the aperture ring on the lens. The first indication that the meter isn't coupling correctly is when there is no meter operation. Repair is best left to those with a knowledge of the minutiae of precision measurements that must be observed during re-assembly of the flange area.

Stop-down separate metering is very tedious and error-prone. If you have a solid background in hand-held metering this may not be a problem, but for a lot of people it is a disincentive to use a grand old camera like this.

As you are new to this camera, a procedure must be followed when removing the prism (for whatever reason). If you remove the prism, and a lens is mounted, then remove the lens. Remount the prism first and then secondly, remount the lens. If this process is not followed, the coupling pin (attached to the chain and visible in the narrow slot running along the front of the base of the focusing screen escutcheon) will not engage correctly with the metering prism and be placed under duress as the aperture ring is used back and forth. This procedure is very important when using the TTL metered prism.

Last edited by Silent Street; 08-26-2014 at 02:45 PM.
08-26-2014, 08:50 PM   #6
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QuoteOriginally posted by Silent Street Quote
A breaking chain is stress-induced, not one that occurs just for the sake of fracturing. It can and does happen if the lens-prism re-mount procedure is not followed as this will impose stress on the chain through operation of the aperture ring on the lens. The first indication that the meter isn't coupling correctly is when there is no meter operation. Repair is best left to those with a knowledge of the minutiae of precision measurements that must be observed during re-assembly of the flange area.

Stop-down separate metering is very tedious and error-prone. If you have a solid background in hand-held metering this may not be a problem, but for a lot of people it is a disincentive to use a grand old camera like this.

As you are new to this camera, a procedure must be followed when removing the prism (for whatever reason). If you remove the prism, and a lens is mounted, then remove the lens. Remount the prism first and then secondly, remount the lens. If this process is not followed, the coupling pin (attached to the chain and visible in the narrow slot running along the front of the base of the focusing screen escutcheon) will not engage correctly with the metering prism and be placed under duress as the aperture ring is used back and forth. This procedure is very important when using the TTL metered prism.




This is good information.
08-26-2014, 09:27 PM   #7
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If it helps any, here are my YouTube videos about the 6X7:






With all of those, you ought to be in pretty good shape for getting started with your 6X7 after its repair.
08-26-2014, 10:40 PM   #8
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When browsing thru the junk section at my local store I find that close to 1/3 of the 6x7 and 67 bodies have broken chains. The rest are usually pretty banged up but still often work just fine with a little TLC.
I think they should have put an engraved warning on the TTL VF and painted it bright red!

08-27-2014, 05:32 AM   #9
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Thank you everyone for the information, I have sent an email to Eric already and will try to get it to him as soon as possible. I'm not sure what caused it, I haven't removed the prism since the day I received it I dont think and I've changed lenses many times. I had read the process of prism off-> lens off -> prism on -> lens on before I got the camera so I was really careful to do it in that order.
Thank you also for the videos I'll give them a watching, shame this happens right when my WLF and handle are on their way.
08-27-2014, 08:36 AM   #10
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QuoteOriginally posted by stinn Quote
Thank you everyone for the information, I have sent an email to Eric already and will try to get it to him as soon as possible. I'm not sure what caused it, I haven't removed the prism since the day I received it I dont think and I've changed lenses many times. I had read the process of prism off-> lens off -> prism on -> lens on before I got the camera so I was really careful to do it in that order.
Thank you also for the videos I'll give them a watching, shame this happens right when my WLF and handle are on their way.
regarding "prism off-> lens off -> prism on -> lens on"

Correct me if I am wrong:

If the purpose is "remove TTL prism", then just remember to remove lens whenever you do this.
So, "prism off-> lens off -> prism on -> lens on", the first two is not needed in this sequence, it can be "lens off -> prism off -> prism on -> lens on" , just make sure lens is not attached when you want to "put TTL prism on".

I don't think you need to remove TTL prism, because prism off - lens off sequence is needed for "changing lenses" - this be very troublesome to change lenses which shooting. Correct me if I am wrong.

The instruction, on Page 9 is:
"When an automatic diaphragm lens has been attached on the camera before mounting the TTL pentaprism, remove the lens and remount it. This is for setting the coupling pin of the TTL pentaprism with the camera's diaphragm coupling slide."

it doesn't say anything about the sequence needed in removing the TTL prism.
08-27-2014, 03:34 PM   #11
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QuoteOriginally posted by LFLee Quote
regarding "prism off-> lens off -> prism on -> lens on"

Correct me if I am wrong:

If the purpose is "remove TTL prism", then just remember to remove lens whenever you do this.
So, "prism off-> lens off -> prism on -> lens on", the first two is not needed in this sequence, it can be "lens off -> prism off -> prism on -> lens on" , just make sure lens is not attached when you want to "put TTL prism on".

I don't think you need to remove TTL prism, because prism off - lens off sequence is needed for "changing lenses" - this be very troublesome to change lenses which shooting. Correct me if I am wrong.

The instruction, on Page 9 is:
"When an automatic diaphragm lens has been attached on the camera before mounting the TTL pentaprism, remove the lens and remount it. This is for setting the coupling pin of the TTL pentaprism with the camera's diaphragm coupling slide."

it doesn't say anything about the sequence needed in removing the TTL prism.
Correct if you change lenses you can ignore the “prism off”, as well as if you are using the manual outer bayonet lenses.

Thankfully this was fixed with the P67II and AE Prism.

Phil.
08-27-2014, 06:10 PM   #12
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I know this is a bit off topic, but this whole discussion points to one more example of an interesting contrast between the Pentax 645 line and the 6x7 line. If limiting our discussion to film bodies, both formats have 3 models (or technically four for the 6x7 if you count the pre-MLU and MLU models as two). The contrast is that in the case of the 645, the biggest improvement was between the original and the 645N. To my thinking, the 645Nii only added minor improvements. On the other hand, the 6x7 series offered only minor improvements (if at all) between the original 6x7 and the second model 67. But then with the release of the 67ii vast improvements were included. At least that's the way it appears for my uses of these cameras. I guess that's why I've settled on the 645N and the 67ii. I started with the original models of both formats. With the 645 format, once I managed to move up to the 645N I felt completely satisfied. Some may feel the addition of MLU on the 645Nii makes it worth the money but I haven't felt the need for it. Whereas with the 6x7 format, I started with the original (MLU version), then some time later got the 67 and finally after deciding to sell off a whole bunch of other bodies and lenses I was able to move up to the 67ii and I absolutely love it. I still have a great appreciation and love for the original versions of both cameras and believe they offer some of the best entry ways into medium format photography. And they are all more than capable of producing fabulous images in the right hands. But for my usage patterns the 67ii is simply hard to beat. And that includes all the other 6x7 cameras I've owned (Bronica GS-1, Mamiya Press, Mamiya RB Pro SD) Perhaps the only 6x7 that I like as much or better is the Fuji GF670 although it is a completely different beast as a rangefinder.
08-27-2014, 08:34 PM   #13
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It's when a 67 body is fitted with both MLU and multi-exposure that it becomes an even more useful instrument for the artist. I am not interested in fancy metering patterns, autofocus etc that feature on later incarnations of the 67 line. I do my own multispot/duplex/incident metering, my own focusing, a lot of multi-exposure work with retro-focus — all on a par with large format but with more film available. I'll probably keep using the 67 until the end of E6 and then move on with other interests.
09-05-2014, 12:42 PM   #14
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I had a broken chain twice - once on my 6x7 and once on may 67. Got it fixed by Host-Photoservice in Germany for app. 200€ each time. One time they fond parts of the broken chain in the shutter mechanism. Further lens changing is annoying with a broken chain because the simulator is never in the right position to change the lens.

Get it fixed and enjoy your 67/6x7
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